Rosario Dawson, Tara Reid and Rachael Leigh Cook Reunite for Josie and the Pussycats ' 20th Anniversary

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Glenn Garner
·3 min read
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Years before Riverdale took over our screens, a cult classic was born with the 2001 comic book comedy Josie and the Pussycats.

Rachael Leigh Cook, Rosario Dawson and Tara Reid recently reunited to virtually celebrate the film's 20th anniversary, which is Sunday, April 11. They starred as Josie McCoy, Valerie Brown and Melodie Valentine, respectively, in the big-screen adaptation of the Archie Comics series and the Hanna Barbera cartoon.

"I'm thrilled that people have continued to watch our movie and that it's only somehow gained steam over the years," said Cook, 41, of the movie, which has aged well after it initially flopped at the box office. "That's incredibly cool."

Dawson, 41, said the film was "ahead of its time," adding, "You watch it now, and it so resonates with the moment that we're in, but at the time, I think it was hard for people to totally appreciate the satire that it was."

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Reid, 45, revealed that the movie is a fan favorite among her loyal followers. "I can't tell you how many places I've gone and they're like, 'My favorite movie that you've done is Josie and the Pussycats,' " she raved. "It means so much to me how much they love it, because it meant so much to us. When we made this film, we had the best time ever."

A satire of fame, commercialism and the music industry, the film followed the titular rock trio as they reach their big break, only to discover that their music is a pawn for a sinister plot of subliminal advertising.

Dawson recalled how Cook got fed up with the hair and makeup chair, deciding to take matters into her own hands. "I remember you wearing that wig everyday, because that red hair was a wig," she said.

"You were putting your hair in and trying to fold it in," she continued. "And one day, you were like, 'Screw that! I'm cutting this off.' And you buzzed your hair so it was easier for you to get ready in the mornings."

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Cook cringed at the memory, as she told Dawson, "I really wish you had talked me out of that." But Dawson assured her, "It was so rockin'!"

Writer/director team Deborah Kaplan and Harry Elfont pitched Netflix a spinoff about DuJour, the doomed boy band played by Seth Green, Donald Faison, Breckin Meyer and Alexander Martin in the original.

They discussed the sequel, entitled Foursome, last year on the limited podcast Josie and the Podcast, explaining it was about the group reuniting years after a massive falling out. "Yes. We pitched it, with Seth and Breckin to Netflix. But it was before Popstar, and essentially it would have been Popstar," Elfont said, referencing Andy Samberg's 2016 music mockumentary.

With an iconic soundtrack featuring Letters to Cleo frontwoman Kay Hanley, the movie was packed with memorable performances from Alan Cumming, Parker Posey, Missi Pyle, Gabriel Mann, Paulo Costanzo, Carson Daly and Eugene Levy.