Queen Elizabeth's Funeral Music Included a Nod to Her 1947 Wedding to Prince Philip

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Queen Elizabeth's Funeral Music Included a Nod to Her 1947 Wedding to Prince Philip

As loved ones began to say their goodbyes to Queen Elizabeth II at her Westminster Abbey state funeral, they paid their respects with a hymn that was sung on a special day in her life.

Among three hymns recited at the Monday service was "The Lord's my Shepherd," which was also sung at her 1947 wedding ceremony to the late Prince Philip. Theirs was the longest marriage in royal history.

Thee music at the funeral of the Queen, who died at her home in Balmoral, Scotland, on Sept. 8 at 96, reflected her Christian faith as well as traditions within the royal family. Another hymn, 'Love divine, all loves excelling," was heard at the 2011 wedding of the Prince and Princess of Wales, according to a tweet from Westminister Abbey.

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Queen Elizabeth II Funeral
Queen Elizabeth II Funeral

BBC America

The music was performed by the Choir of Westminster Abbey and the Choir of His Majesty's Chapel Royal, with both choirs being led by Westminster Abbey's Organist and Master of the Choristers James O'Donnell, according to Wales Online. The organ during the funeral was played by Peter Holder, and Matthew Jorys played pieces beforehand.

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A specially commissioned choral piece "Like as the Hart" was composed for the service by the master of the king's music, Judith Weir.

Queen Elizabeth II Funeral
Queen Elizabeth II Funeral

BBC America

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"The piece, inspired by Her Majesty's unwavering Christian faith, is a setting of Psalm 42 to music and will be sung unaccompanied," Buckingham Palace said, per ABC News.

Also performed was "O taste and see," an anthem composed by Ralph Vaughan Williams for the Queen's 1953 coronation.

Wedding of Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip
Wedding of Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip

Hulton Archive/Getty Prince Philip and the Queen on their wedding day

Among other pieces performed at the state funeral were "Fantasia of four parts" by Orlando Gibbon, "Reliqui domum meum" by Peter Maxwell Davies, "romanza (Symphony No. 5 in D)" by Ralph Vaughan Williams, "Prelude on 'Ecce jam noctis' Op 157 No. 3" by Healey Willan, "Meditation on 'Brother James's Air'" by Harold Darke, "Psalm Prelude Set 1 No. 2" by Herbert Howells, "Fantasy on 'O Paradise'" by Malcolm Williamson, "In the Country Op 194 No. 2" by Charles Villiers Stanford, "Elegy Op 58" by Edward Elgar, "Andante espressivo (Sonata in G Op 28)" by Edward Elgar and "Sospiri Op 70" by Edward Elgar, according to Wales Online.

The choir closed off the ceremony with a performance of "God Save the King," before a two-minute moment of silence Monday morning.

While most in attendance sang along at the Queen's service, her son King Charles III noticeably did not sing along to the national anthem. The monarch, 73, stood silent as those at the service sang "God Save the King," formerly known as "God Save the Queen" during Queen Elizabeth's reign.

The song, which is performed to the monarch, was first performed in London in September 1745 and "this practice soon spread to other theatres, and the custom of greeting monarchs with the song as he or she entered a place of public entertainment was thus established," per the royal family's official website.