Novak Djokovic Confirms He'll Play in Tokyo Olympics After Expressing Uncertainty About Competing

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Serbia's Novak Djokovic celebrates winning against Italy's Matteo Berrettini during their men's singles final match on the thirteenth day of the 2021 Wimbledon Championships at The All England Tennis Club in Wimbledon, southwest London, on July 11, 2021.
Serbia's Novak Djokovic celebrates winning against Italy's Matteo Berrettini during their men's singles final match on the thirteenth day of the 2021 Wimbledon Championships at The All England Tennis Club in Wimbledon, southwest London, on July 11, 2021.

Glyn Kirk/AFP via Getty Novak Djokovic

Novak Djokovic is headed to the Tokyo Olympics after all.

The 34-year-old tennis star announced on social media Thursday that he will indeed compete in the postponed 2020 Summer Olympics, just days after he expressed uncertainty about whether he'd be in attendance.

"Cannot disappoint my little friend Koujirou. I booked my flight for Tokyo and will proudly be joining #TeamSerbia for the Olympics," he wrote alongside a clip of a video he sent to a 6-year-old fan on his birthday.

In a subsequent tweet, roughly translated to English, Djokovic added, "I am very proud to pack for Tokyo and join our national team in the fight for the brightest medals on the Olympic arenas. For me, the game for Serbia has always been a special joy and motivation and I will do my best to make us all happy! Let's go!"

After winning the Wimbledon men's singles final on Sunday, the athlete said he wasn't sure if he would compete in the upcoming Olympics, citing restrictions in place because of the pandemic. "My plan was always to go to Olympic Games, but right now I'm a little bit divided," Djokovic said at the time, per NBC Sports.

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"I also hear that there's going to be a lot of restrictions within the [Athletes'] Village. Possibly you would not be able to see other athletes perform live," he continued. "I can't even have my stringer that is [a] very important part of my team … I'm limited with the amount of people I can take in my team as well."

In a final word on his plans for the Games, which begin July 23, the athlete added that his attendance is "kind of 50-50 because of what I heard in the last couple days."

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The delayed Tokyo Olympics will be the star's fourth consecutive Olympics. Djokovic, who is currently ranked No. 1 in the world by the ATP Tour, won the bronze at the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

Because Djokovic has already won Wimbledon, the Australian Open and French Open in 2021, a gold medal at the Olympics and a victory at the U.S. Open (which starts Aug. 30) would set him up to become the first man to win a calendar year Golden Slam. The feat was first achieved by Steffi Graf in 1988, and has gone unmatched since.