No, Tennessee didn’t invade North Carolina. Here’s why its flag is ​over the Capitol

·2 min read

Tennessee has not invaded North Carolina.

But a photo circulating social media Tuesday of a Volunteer State flag flying over the Capitol building had some jokingly speculating otherwise.

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“So I was going to get a lot of work done today, but then Tennessee overthrew North Carolina during a gas shortage and now I’m just trying to keep up,” one user tweeted, referencing the panic buying of gas spurred by the Colonial Pipeline shutdown.

“Not sure if this means war or that we no longer have a state income tax...#ncpol,” another tweeted.

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But the Tar Heel state has not, in fact, been annexed into Tennessee.

An independent film called “Evolution” is filming in the area, Guy Caster, director of the North Carolina Film Office, told McClatchy News in an email.

“As you can probably put together, the feature film is set in the Volunteer State,” Caster said.

Gov. Roy Cooper’s office also confirmed with WRAL reporter Travis Fain that the flag is a prop for the film and not a symbol that Tennessee conquered North Carolina.

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But some social media users have refused the explanation.

“I’m not buying it...someone get Georgia on high alert,” one wrote.

“Exactly what the invaders would say until they have completely secured the capitol grounds,” another tweeted.

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“No no, I have it on good authority that Tennessee has annexed North Carolina. Sorry @Canes, @Panthers, and @Hornets, you’re all part of Tennessee now, I don’t make the rules,” one wrote.

“Do we get Dolly Parton?” one user tweeted.

“If TN invaded NC we’d get Asheville and a coastline and they’d get real bbq,” another said.

Others suggested making Tennessee part of North Carolina in response.

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