New Movies: Release Calendar for January 14, Plus Where to Watch the Latest Films

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  • Mamoru Hosoda
    Japanese anime director

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As theaters begin showing signs of life and streaming and VOD options stay hefty, there are more movies (and platforms to watch them on) than ever to sift through, and IndieWire is here to help you do just that each week.

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After a slim few weeks at the 2022 box office, a wide variety of new options are finally hitting both theaters and in-home platforms, including a much-anticipated (and quite well-reviewed) requel to the beloved “Scream” series, care of the Radio Silence dudes, plus a number of festival picks from around the circuit, including “Belle,” “Italian Studies,” and “The Pink Cloud.” Awards season chugs along, as Joel Coen’s black and white “The Tragedy of Macbeth” moves from limited theaters to streaming on AppleTV+ and, lest the little ones get squirrelly, a brand-new “Hotel Transylvania” is also arriving on Amazon Prime Video, after a number of pushed-back release dates and a sale from Sony.

Each film is now available in a theater near you or in the comfort of your own home (or, in some cases, both, the convenience of it all). Browse your options below.

Week of January 10 – January 16

New Films in Theaters

“Belle” (directed by Mamoru Hosoda)
Distributor: GKIDS
Where to Find It: Theaters

“Beauty and the Beast” meets online bullying in a hyper-modern anime riff on the classic fairy tale (or at least the Disney version of it), as “Miraï” director Mamoru Hosoda pushes his boundless imagination to new extremes in a visually dazzling musical about how J-Pop can save the world. If that seems like too much ground for a cartoon to cover in the span of a two-hour coming-of-age story, keep in mind that Hosoda has a knack for reaching familiar places in rivetingly unexpected fashions. Case in point: The heroine of “Belle” enters the movie atop a flying humpback whale that’s barnacled with hundreds of stereo speakers. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Italian Studies”
“Italian Studies”

“Italian Studies” (directed by Adam Leon)
Distributor: Magnolia
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD and digital options

A dreamy lark of a movie shot piecemeal between July 2018 and April of the following year, Adam Leon’s “Italian Studies” may be set along (and expertly stolen from) the crowded sidewalks of London and New York, but it’s unmistakably suffused with the woozy dislocation and “we have to make something” life-force of a COVID film. No one is wearing masks or social distancing in the heat of lower Manhattan on a summer afternoon, yet Leon’s heroine — a successful author played by Vanessa Kirby at a time just before people on the street would recognize her as one of the gutsiest actresses of her generation, or as anyone at all — is lost in a fugue state that vividly reflects the isolation and uncertainty of the last 18 months. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Pink Cloud” (directed by Iuli Gerbase)
Distributor: Blue Fox Entertainment
Where to Find It: Select theaters

Make no mistake: Iuli Gerbase’s feature directorial debut is prescient, and not just another pandemic-centric property rushed out during times of global upheaval. The rising Brazilian filmmaker’s “The Pink Cloud” opens with a notation that is both funny and painful. “This film was written in 2017 and shot in 2019. Any resemblance to actual events is purely coincidental.” “Coincidental” is putting it mildly.

The Portuguese-language film opens innocently enough, literally all blue skies shining above. And yet, there’s something very wrong, with a discordant score playing over it all and a certain tension to cinematographer Bruno Polidoro’s framing that makes even the brightest of these vistas feel somehow off. Across them, a series of fluffy pink clouds float, moving perhaps a bit too fast. They are: and with murderous intent, as they dip low in the sky, and aim straight at a distant human figure and his dog. He collapses, the dog lives. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Pink Cloud” - Credit: Sundance
“The Pink Cloud” - Credit: Sundance

Sundance

“Scream” (directed by Matt Bettinelli-Olpin and Tyler Gillett)
Distributor: Paramount Pictures
Where to Find It: Theaters

“It’s always someone you know,” goes the tag line for “Scream,” the fifth installment in the beloved slasher franchise jumpstarted by the late Wes Craven and writer Kevin Williamson in 1996. It might be more accurate to say it’s always the movie you know, as “Scream” has delivered reliable jump cuts and stabbings for its bloody duration. Though the new movie lopped off the numeral to reclaim the original title, there’s nothing in the story that ignores “Scream” is the fifth chapter in the killing spree saga that has long plagued the fictional town of Woodsboro, California. “Scream” makes so many references to its predecessors, along with plenty of other horror flicks both lowbrow and high, it’s impossible to forget you’re watching a fictional film. It may be exciting to let the audience in on the joke, but it’s hard to get lost in this world. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“The Curse of La Patasola” (directed by AJ Jones)
Distributor: Vertical Entertainment
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD and digital options

“The Free Fall” (directed by Adam Stilwell)
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD and digital options

“Potato Dreams of America” (directed by Wes Hurley)
Distributor: Dark Star Pictures
Where to Find It: Select theaters

“Shattered” (directed by David Loughery)
Distributor: Lionsgate
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD and digital options

“Stoker Hills” (directed by Benjamin Louis)
Distributor: Screen Media
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD and digital options

“Who We Are: A Chronicle of Racism in America” (directed by Emily Kunstler and Sarah Kunstler)
Distributor: Sony Pictures Classics
Where to Find It: Theaters

New Films on VOD and Streaming, Including Premium Platforms

“The Tragedy of Macbeth” (directed by Joel Coen)
Distributor: Apple and A24
Where to Find It: Streaming on AppleTV+

The Scottish Play has been adapted into more than 25 different movies since J. Stuart Blackton first gave it a whirl in 1908, and yet Joel Coen’s “The Tragedy of Macbeth” is such a strange hybrid between cinema and theater that it seems to exist in a realm all its own. Shot in atemporal black-and-white on a Los Angeles soundstage made to resemble the half-empty guts of a leaky snow-globe, this dark lucid dream of a film might be the latest example of a grand tradition, but its hermetically sealed design makes it sound more like an echo chamber. There are mad whispers bleeding through the concrete walls — dark thoughts that curve around the fake night sky — but the voices seem to be coming from inside the castle. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Tragedy of Macbeth”
“The Tragedy of Macbeth”

Also available this week:

“Hotel Transylvania: Transformania” (directed by Jennifer Kluska and Derek Drymon)
Distributor: Amazon Studios
Where to Find It: Streaming on Amazon Prime Video

Check out more films to watch on the next page.

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