New Movies: Release Calendar for July 1, Plus Where to Watch the Latest Films

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As theaters begin showing signs of life and streaming and VOD options stay hefty, there are more movies (and platforms to watch them on) than ever to sift through, and IndieWire is here to help you do just that each week.

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Celebratory feelings might be in short supply this Fourth of July holiday, but the feeling that there’s little on offer for a wide audience who like things that are well, good, doesn’t have to necessarily extend to the multiplex (or even a VOD platform) near you. While the weekend will likely be dominated by the second standalone “Minions” film, a ’70s-inflected kiddie story about those cute little yellow guys and their tiny “mini boss,” savvy cinephiles will find plenty to appreciate elsewhere.

For instance, what about the lauded Costa Rican “Clara Sola,” a feverish riff on “Carrie” that’s still highly original? Or maybe you’re missing “Bridgerton” and want another color-conscious Regency era rom-com to delight you? Then the fizzy “Mr. Malcolm’s List” is for you. Want to see a bunch of baddies get their rarefied world turned upside down? Opt for “The Forgiven.” Just want to kind of be sad? That’s fine, too, and “Hallelujah: Leonard Cohen, A Song, A Journey” should fit the bill.

While this weekend doesn’t over the staggering variety we’ve been treated to in recent weeks, there are (always!) gems for every kind of movie fan, and that’s worth celebrating.

Each film is now available in a theater near you or in the comfort of your own home (or, in some cases, both, the convenience of it all). Browse your options below.

Week of June 27 – July 3

New Films in Theaters

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“Clara Sola” (directed by Nathalie Álvarez Mesén) — IndieWire Critic’s Pick
Distributor: Oscilloscope
Where to Find It:
 Select theaters in NYC, expanding to LA on July 8

From the florid opening frames of Clara (Wendy Chinchilla Araya) reaching toward her beloved horse Yuca — Araya’s hands grasping at the air as if trying to pull the horse closer at the same time as they hope to escape from her wrists — “Clara Sola” is fleshed with the feeling that love and repression are braided together. It’s bound by the sense that we smother the things most precious to us in order to keep them from getting away. A sinewy fable about a woman who’s made to feel as if she’s at once both not enough and also everything, Nathalie Álvarez Mesén’s fever dream of a film may be steeped in Catholic religiosity, but it ultimately places what’s left of its faith in the act of letting go. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Clara Sola”
“Clara Sola”

“The Forgiven” (directed by John Michael McDonagh)
Distributor: Vertical Entertainment, Roadside Attractions
Where to Find It:
 Theaters

If the vision of Jessica Chastain in a sleek LBD sniffing coke and then vigorously bedding Christopher Abbott during a bacchanal in Morocco stokes your flames, then John Michael McDonagh’s “The Forgiven” is the movie for you. “I wish I wasn’t so worried,” she says before jubilantly downing another line of white powder. She wishes she were more worried about her husband, played by Ralph Fiennes, a selfish doctor who, during their now-derailed vacation stay at an old-time friend’s deliciously depraved party in the desert, has run over a Muslim child and failed to cover it up. She wishes she cared that he’s now been carted off to the boy’s Berber village in middle-of-nowhere North Africa to do penance by the kid’s father, and where he could possibly be hung and quartered. Will she miss him at all? Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Hallelujah: Leonard Cohen, A Journey, A Song” (directed by Dan Geller and Dayna Goldfine)
Distributor: Sony Pictures Classics
Where to Find It:
 Select theaters in NYC and LA

“Hallelujah: Leonard Cohen, A Journey, A Song” aims to tackle all these things at once — to tell Cohen’s multifaceted story before, during, and after he wrote that song, and to tell the song’s story long after it had cut ties from its maker. For two hours, it’s a lot. There are flashes of deep emotional resonance, of amusing coincidences, and smug vindication as Cohen ponders the “mild sense of revenge in my heart” when looking back on Yetnikoff’s initial assessment of what was arguably his life’s greatest work. But there’s also a huge amount of whiplash, as the wide-reaching documentary attempts to crystallize something as mercurial as this through performers, fans, lovers, haters, naysayers, believers. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Minions: The Rise of Gru” - Credit: NBCUniversal
“Minions: The Rise of Gru” - Credit: NBCUniversal

NBCUniversal

“Minions: The Rise of Gru” (directed by Kyle Balda)
Distributor: Universal Pictures
Where to Find It:
 Theaters

Of course the Minions would get their own spinoff, and a canny one at that: 2015’s “Minions” smartly went the prequel route, tracking the wacky history of the little guys, setting them up on a snazzy ’70s-fueled adventure, and eventually leading them to their beloved “mini boss,” kid Gru. Seven years later, the little guys are back for another story, though this one is besieged by classic retconning problems, mainly that Gru was maybe always kind of a sweetheart? And any lesson he needs to learn as an 11-year-old, we’ve already seen play out over the course of three other films? Oops.

Still: Minions! Which is probably the point, because no matter how enjoyable this franchise can be (and has been) for a wide audience before, it is a series mostly geared toward children. Kyle Balda’s “Minions: The Rise of Gru” goes all in on that line of thinking, offering up a messy, madcap sequel that’s strictly for the little ones. Are there Minions? Yes. Are they cute and funny and silly and and unintelligible and really not evil at all? Yes. Do they sport a wide array of ’70s-leaning outfits and wigs? Yes. Do they learn kung fu from Michelle Yeoh? Somehow, yes. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Mr. Malcolm’s List” (directed by Emma Holly Jones)
Distributor: Bleecker Street
Where to Find It:
 Theaters

It’s 1818, and “the season” is in full swing in upper-crust London. High society’s “ton” is out in full force, swanning their way through balls, operas, suppers, teas, strolls around both large and small bodies of water, and even the odd horse sale, all in service to one principal aim: capturing a spouse, and hopefully one with plenty of money to their aristocratic name. But one society lady continues to strike out, and as she enters her fifth season (her fifth! cue the bosom-clutching!) without snagging a suitable husband, things are getting mighty desperate. Soon enough, they’ll even get downright mean.

First-time feature filmmaker Emma Holly Jones spins a lush, lavish, and quite frisky tale with her “Mr. Malcolm’s List,” presenting a fresh twist on the Regency Era rom-com that has kept author Jane Austen such a hot commodity for so long. Jones, however, makes nearly as many missteps along the way (said mean streak, predictable plotting, and a conclusion that feels far too pat) as she does smart choices (delightful casting, wicked humor, and some genuine chemistry), keeping the film from reaching the upper echelon of this charming sub-genre. But, hey, when did the course of true love ever run smooth? Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Accepted” (directed by Dan Chen)
Distributor: Greenwich Entertainment
Where to Find It: 
Select theaters, plus various VOD and digital platforms

“Code Name Banshee” (directed by Jon Keeyes)
Distributor: Screen Media
Where to Find It: 
Select theaters, plus various VOD and digital platforms

“Hot Seat” (directed by James Cullen Bressack)
Distributor: Lionsgate
Where to Find It: 
Select theaters, plus various VOD and digital platforms

“Rubikon” (directed by Leni Lauritsch)
Distributor: IFC Films
Where to Find It: 
Select theaters, plus various VOD and digital platforms

New Films on VOD and Streaming, Including Premium Platforms and Virtual Cinema

“Beauty” (directed by Andrew Donsumu)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It:
Streaming on Netflix

The fantasy, power, and impact of the music industry has been well-documented in motion pictures. This very minute, audiences can go to a theater and learn all about the highs and lows of musical icon Elvis Presley. It’s difficult to craft something original from a world littered with as many success stories as horror stories, many of them already told (and told again) on screens both big and small.

And it’s even more difficult to do that when your main character — presented as a generational talent deserving of her own cinematic event — never actually sings a song. Such is the case with screenwriter Lena Waithe’s new Netflix musical drama “Beauty.” Though heavily inspired by the life of Whitney Houston, enough that it may well qualify as something of an unauthorized biopic of the massive musical star, “Beauty” fails to hit the right notes, leaving too much unspoken and (quite literally) unsung. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Beauty” - Credit: Stephanie Meiling/NETFLIX © 202
“Beauty” - Credit: Stephanie Meiling/NETFLIX © 202

Stephanie Meiling/NETFLIX © 202

“The Princess” (directed by Le-Van Kiet)
Distributor: 20th Century Studios
Where to Find It:
Streaming on Hulu

There’s something kind of remarkable about watching a 90-minute film that only has a single idea spread across its entire running time — “what if ‘The Raid,’ but about a fairy tale princess trying to fight her way down from the castle tower where she’s been imprisoned by an evil suitor?” — but my awe at what passes for a movie these days was no match for my disappointment in this one. Hulu’s dull and exasperatingly basic “The Princess” wastes a slew of talent on a straight-to-streaming cheapo so undercooked that it feels like an AMC psy-op designed to make you run to the nearest multiplex and beg for a ticket to whatever’s showing next. Even Gru feels good in a place like this. Read IndieWire’s full review. 

Also available this week:

“Endangered” (directed by Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady)
Distributor: HBO
Where to Find It: 
Streaming on HBO and HBO Max

Check out more films to watch on the next page.

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