Here Are The Most Shocking "Squid Game" Scenes That Truly Haunt My Sleep

·10 min read

Netflix's Squid Game does not pull its punches when it comes to its shocking plot twists, heartbreaking betrayals, and deaths. Even I, a lover of graphic shows, could not have predicted these wild moments.

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But some of these moments had me picking my jaw up off the floor and being absolutely certain that they would end in "and it was all a dream." Here are the 19 most surprising things to happen in Squid Game, which will probably take me a few more years to recover from.

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🚨Major spoilers ahead🚨

1.The number of people who died in Red Light, Green Light.

Players in "Squid Game" playing Red Light Green Light.

Since I saw the trailer for the show before I watched it, I was not surprised by "Red Light, Green Light," or the fact that people would be killed during the games. I was, however, very alarmed by the number of people who were killed. This was the first game, so I did not expect them to just go off and shoot literally everyone. How would they have enough people to keep playing if like 80% of the players died right away? Also, I can't be the only one who thought it looked like way less than 201 people made it across the finish line.

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2.That the others who left the game were allowed to stay home and not forced to come back.

"Squid Game" voting process and Gi-hun riding in the car back to the games.

At the beginning of Episode 2, the players were able to take a vote and choose whether or not to continue playing the games. They ended up voting to leave, which is very surprising now that we know what we know about Il-Nam (did he know that people would end up coming back to play, or did he just not care whether the games went on?). A majority of the players changed their mind by the end of the episode and were on their way back to the games, but those who decided to stay home were apparently left to their own devices. I expected that everyone would have to come back and play if the majority decided to do so, not that some people would still be able to stay home.

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3.Sang-woo's betrayal of Gi-hun during the honeycomb game.

Sang-woo and Gi-hun during honeycomb game.

I think what shocks me the most about this scene is that Gi-hun knows that Sang-woo is a total backstabbing liar, and he just files that little piece of information away to never use again. Like, he forgives Sang-woo immediately and tells nobody that he can't be trusted. I feel like if Gi-hun spoke up, a lot of Sang-woo's future betrayals would not have happened because they would have known not to trust him.

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4.Gi-hun's team winning Tug of War.

"Squid Game" tug of war.

Don't get me wrong — I knew in theory they had to somehow win because the team was made up of literally every single protagonist so they couldn't just kill them all off in one fell swoop, but I expected some type of loophole for them to squeeze through to get there. I truly did not think they would be able to beat the other team, even with an innovative strategy.

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5.Jun-ho discovering the games go back to at least 1988.

Jun-ho in filing closet with Squid Game binders.

No part of me expected that these games were an annual thing, which I guess is kind of stupid because they were clearly very well organized. When Jun-ho found the binders that showed all of the past games, I was genuinely thrown.

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6.And while we're on the topic, the fact that Jun-ho lasted for so long as a staff member without people actually realizing he was an outsider was wild.

Jun-ho disguised as a staff member.

Every single one of his scenes I was on the edge of my seat expecting his identity to be discovered. I understand that they weren't allowed to talk and wore masks the whole time, but like, he didn't know what to do for anything. I'm sure they had implicit rules that everyone else just followed and he was clearly very confused by. What if he had to go to the bathroom? What if his staff rotation changed and he followed the wrong people to an area he wasn't supposed to be working at? Plus, they showed that there were cameras in his bedroom, so in theory, his brother should have already known he was there.

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7.The marble game twist.

"Squid Game" players find out they would be playing against each other in a marble game.

When I found out that the marble game partners were playing against each other and not together, my stomach dropped to my feet. I did not see that twist coming, and I thought the entire time that it was somehow a test and that every one of the protagonists would make it out anyway.

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8.And while we're discussing the marble game that actually ripped my life source from my body... Gi-hun using Il-nam's dementia against him while Il-nam secretly knew he was being manipulated the whole time shook me.

Gi-hun and Il-nam.

OK, yes, hindsight is 20/20, but let's all go back to the feeling we got the moment when Il-nam revealed that he knew what Gi-hun was doing and was just playing along. Obviously, we now know that he was never really in danger of getting shot, but Gi-hun's manipulation honestly broke my heart, and it surprised me that he would go that far, and that Il-nam would play along. It really shows how far anyone will go, even those with a strong sense of justice.

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9.And Ali's death in particular... Is it wrong of me to think Sang-woo is the worst character on the whole show?

Ali's death and Sang-woo handing over marbles.

It's still a little too soon for me to get into this scene tbh, because whenever I think about it I'm filled with a burning hot rage. I did not believe they would do this to Ali until I heard the gun go off, and even then, I was so sure they would somehow bring him back to life. While I was able to predict Ji-yeong's death, because it felt like they introduced her character strictly so they could kill her off and you would feel a little bit emotional about it, I did not expect them to do the same to Ali. I'm always so shocked when evil people win because it feels so wrong.

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10.The presence of the westerner VIPs, who suggested this game was played all over the world.

VIPs.

Similar to when Jun-ho found out that the games had been going on for at least a few decades now, I was not expecting the games to also be something held around the world. When one of the VIPs mentioned that South Korea was doing a great job at hosting the games that year in comparison to other places, I did not see it coming. I wonder what games are played in the different countries, and why they needed to host them in more than one place.

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11.The number of people who died on the glass bridge.

Glass bridge game.

I was really alarmed when the glass bridge challenge was presented. I know it was the second to last game, but up until that point I was kind of under the impression that a few people could win the games and split the prize. Once all but three of the contestants died, I realized that actually only 1 person would probably come out alive of the 456 players.

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12.And the fact that the western VIPs encouraged them to kill more people during the glass bridge challenge was horrific, to say the least. `

Glass Bridge game and VIP.

Why were they upset that the glassworker had found the hack? Didn't that make it more interesting than just watching people randomly fall to their deaths? At least now it was more of a game and less of just chance. Wouldn't it be boring if everyone was dead before the final games? There were 16 people and 18 steps on the bridge, so in theory, everyone could just die, and there wouldn't be anyone left to play the final game. In comparison to the other games, the Glass Bridge game surprised me the most because it seemed the least like an actual game.

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13.Jun-ho's death at the hands of his brother.

Jun-ho's death and the Front Man.

While I actually saw it coming that the Front Man was Jun-ho's brother (thank you detective skills from watching one too many Sherlock Holmes shows), I did not think he would shoot Jun-ho. I figured they would take him back to the base, or somehow he would get away. While true fandom nerds know that nobody is dead until you see their death onscreen, I was still very surprised by how their interaction ended. Not a great brotherly reunion, if you ask me.

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14.Sang-woo's suicide.

Sang-woo's death.

I did not think Sang-woo had it in him to kill himself. When Gi-hun refused to finish the game, I was sure Sang-woo would grab the knife and stab Gi-hun and kill him. I was really preparing myself to have to deal with Sang-woo as the winner, which would have truly bruised my heart. The entire game he seemed like he would do anything to win, so I didn't think he was above a little trickery. I thought he would pretend to need Gi-hun's help, just to stab him when he reached out.

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15.The fact that Gi-hun actually received all the prize money.

The "Squid Game" prize money.

Am I the only one who thought there was a really big chance that it was all a lie and whoever won the money would just be sent home with nothing or be killed? Like, what was making them ACTUALLY give the money to the victor? Who would he tell?

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16.Gi-hun didn't spend any of the prize money.

Gi-hun checking his bank account.

I get that Gi-hun was very clearly experiencing PTSD and extreme depression after having experienced such a horrible thing, but I kind of hoped he would have reached out and helped the families of some of the players he knew. He could have reached out to Sae-Byeok's little brother much sooner, or used his money to help people in need. I was pretty shocked that he chose to do nothing good with it (at first).

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17.That Sae-Byeok's little brother was taken to stay with Sang-woo's mom.

Gi-hun getting San-Byeok's brother and handing him over to Sang-woo's mom.

A duo I didn't know I needed, but am so happy to be given. I never would have predicted these two would be put together. But also, did Sang-woo's mom ask to take care of a child? Or did Gi-hun just randomly drop a stranger off at her house and expect her to adopt him?

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18.Il-nam's role as the ringleader the whole time.

Il-nam.

This one needs no explanation. I think I speak for all of us when I say I will never recover from this reveal.

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19.Finally, that Gi-hun won the final game of humanity against Il-nam.

Gi-hun and Il-nam.

What does this MEAN????? When Gi-hun won that final game in which they bet that nobody would help the homeless man on the street corner, was it to show that there was still human decency in the world? Or that good always overcomes evil? In a show full of excess murder that is literally all about the evils of humanity, I didn't expect that the final game was won in favor of justice and kindness.

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What did you guys think? Let me know in the comments below if I'm just easily caught off guard or if you were also shocked by these scenes.