Molly Ringwald Hasn't 'Found the Strength' to Watch Her Past Movies with 'Woke' Daughter Adele, 12

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  • Molly Ringwald
    Molly Ringwald
    American actress
  • Adele
    Adele
    English singer and songwriter
Molly Ringwald; 'The Breakfast Club
Molly Ringwald; 'The Breakfast Club

Sean Zanni/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images; Universal Pictures/Getty Images

Molly Ringwald may not show her younger two kids her '80s movies, given today's modern context.

The actress — known for classic teen comedies like Sixteen Candles (1984), Pretty in Pink (1986) and The Breakfast Club (1985) — previously opened up about her complicated feelings toward her past films, noting instances of racism, sexism and homophobia present in some of them.

Though she sat down and rewatched Breakfast Club with her eldest, daughter Mathilda, when she was 10 (she turns 18 this month), writing about the experience for a New Yorker essay in 2018, Ringwald, 53, doesn't predict she'll view her decades-old movies with her younger two, 12-year-old twins Roman and Adele.

"It definitely is a different time. People ask me if I've watched them with my kids, and I did watch the first one — which was the impetus to write that article — with Mathilda. And it was such an emotional experience that I haven't found that strength to watch it with my two other kids," Ringwald said on SiriusXM's Radio Andy this week.

She continued with a laugh, "My 12-year-old daughter Adele is the most woke individual that you've ever met, and I just don't know how I'm gonna go through that, you know, watching it with her and [her] saying, 'How could you do that? How could you be part of something that....' "

RELATED: Molly Ringwald Reflects on Sixteen Candles in Wake of #MeToo: 'There Were Parts That Bothered Me'

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Ringwald, elsewhere in the conversation, explained that while there are "troubling" elements of the movies in question, "On the other hand, they're also about people that felt like outsiders. They speak to a lot of people. They're complicated. I feel like that's what makes the movies really wonderful."

While she wants to "change" the questionable elements for the future, "That doesn't mean at all that I want them to be erased. I'm proud of those movies, and I have a lot of affection for them. They are so much a part of me."

RELATED VIDEO: Molly Ringwald Explains How Different Sets Are Today and Says Being a Teen Is 'Way Harder Now'

Earlier this year, Ringwald spoke to Vogue, reflecting on Pretty in Pink's 35th anniversary and also explaining her "complicated" relationship with the films.

"I recognize that those films are so meaningful for generations of people. I feel very protective of them, but at the same time I also have complicated feelings toward them," she said. "I definitely feel like they're flawed, and there are things I don't like about them — the lack of diversity in particular always bothers me. I'm more conflicted about The Breakfast Club and Sixteen Candles than Pretty in Pink, which I feel is actually the least problematic of the three."

"But I would say overall," added Ringwald, "that I feel very loving and nostalgic towards the films I made with [director] John [Hughes]. They occupy an important part of my life."