Miley Cyrus says she's been asked why she sounds like a man her whole singing career

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Miley Cyrus says she's been asked why she sounds like a man her whole singing career
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No one is immune to criticism in the music industry as Miley Cyrus can attest.

The "Wrecking Ball" singer recently spoke with Metallica drummer Lars Ulrich for a story in Interview Magazine, where she opened up about specific comments she's gotten about her performance over the years.

While discussing her recording process for a cover of Metallica's "Nothing Else Matters" — which was done in her studio due to the pandemic — Cyrus brought up how recording the song privately let her sing in an authentic way.

"My whole life, whether in vocal training or just continuing to hone my craft, it's always been about, 'Why do you sound like a man? Where's your f---ing falsetto, bitch? Why can't you sing the high octave of 'Party in the U.S.A.' anymore?'" Cyrus revealed to Ulrich. "In this song, I get to sing in that low register, and I get to live in that authentic, genuine sound. My voice is how I represent myself. It's how I express myself."

Miley Cyrus
Miley Cyrus

Ethan Miller/Getty Miley Cyrus performing at 2019 iHeartRadio Music Festival.

Cyrus recorded "Nothing Else Matters" as part of her new tribute album called "The Metallica Blacklist," which includes collaborations with Elton John and Yo-Yo Ma. During the interview, the singer, who has always held strong views about her performance and her values, reiterated she's at a point in her career where she's embracing confidence about who she is — low voice and all.

"I am who I am. I say what I mean in the moment, even if that changes tomorrow," Cyrus told Ulrich. "I was honored by the fact that I didn't have to sing this song in the way that females are "supposed" to sing. You can hear that at the end of the song, when I take the gloves off and just start flying. That part of the song really grabs people. It's that lower register of my voice. So I'm grateful to have a song where I can lean into that."

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