Miley Cyrus Says She'll 'Always' Love Ex-Husband Liam Hemsworth But 'There Was Too Much Conflict'

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Neilson Barnard/Getty; Cindy Ord/Getty

Miley Cyrus is getting candid about why her marriage to Liam Hemsworth didn't work out.

The "Prisoner" singer, 28, stopped by The Howard Stern Show on Wednesday when she opened up about her new album Plastic Hearts, as well as dating during the pandemic and her divorce from her The Last Song costar, 30. Cyrus and Hemsworth tied the knot in December 2018, and Hemsworth filed for divorce months later in August 2019, citing irreconcilable differences. The divorce was finalized in January of this year.

Cyrus told Stern that still loves Hemsworth "very much" and "always will," but "there was too much conflict." She added, "I don't get off on drama or fighting."

"I don't know if we ever really thought we were actually going to get married," she said, recalling how losing their Malibu home two years ago in a wildfire impacted their relationship: "Me being an intense person and not wanting to sit with it and not wanting to go, you know, 'What could be purposeful about this?' I just clung to what I had left of that house, which was me and him."

Hemsworth sold the property to an unidentified buyer for $3.6 million last month. The former couple originally intended for their wedding ceremony to be held at the Malibu residence before it was burned down.

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RELATED: Liam Hemsworth Sells Wildfire-Damaged Malibu Home Where He Lived with Ex Miley Cyrus for $3.6M

Cyrus also opened up about dating while also self-isolating amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic — and finding socially distanced ways to connect with other people. She split from Cody Simpson over the summer after 10 months of dating.

"This time has been really interesting and challenging for any sort of dating or meeting people," she told Stern. "I do a lot of FaceTime sex — it's the safest sex. I'm not getting COVID. I am definitely not going to be doing anything that's irresponsible for myself or for other people … it's just ridiculous for anybody that won't take the right precautions to keep each other safe. It's f—ed up."

"I love people, I love who I love, I've had relationships with all genders and I'm down," added Cyrus. "Right now I'm kind of in the mood for some D, but I'm down for whatever, honestly."

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"I’ve filtered my life of what I will accept and what I will not," said the singer

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The former Hannah Montana actress also described herself as someone who seeks "structure" and stability in a partner — contrary to the "free bird" persona many assume she has.

"I am not a free bird. I love structure," she said. "Structure keeps me safe and keeps me my best and I love to be anchored and weighted by people. I don't want to be friends with feathers, I want you to be, like, cement for me."

Reflecting on the wildfires weeks after the blazes, Cyrus said during an On Air with Ryan Seacrest interview that she found solace in wisdom shared by her father, Billy Ray Cyrus.

"My dad has always told me, 'Life is a series of adjustments.' And sometimes we never understand what our parents are telling us until we start to experience life more because they learn those things as they go," she said at the time. "So I'm starting to really understand what that means now. I think experiencing something as life-changing and devastating as a natural disaster, it's a really deep character challenge, I think, to see the way you react to loss."