Melissa Etheridge Coped with Music and Connected with Fans After Son's Overdose: 'Very Healing'

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Jeff Nelson
·2 min read
Melissa Etheridge Coped with Music and Connected with Fans After Son's Overdose: 'Very Healing'
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How Melissa Etheridge Turned to Music to Cope After Son’s Fatal Overdose

Nearly nine months after her beloved son Beckett died of an opioid overdose, the rock star opens up about the pain of watching him battle addiction — and how she’s helping other families.

After losing her son to an opioid overdose last May, Melissa Etheridge turned to music.

The Grammy- and Oscar-winning rocker had already been performing daily live-stream concerts from her office during the pandemic. But when her 21-year-old son Beckett succumbed to a years-long battle with opioid addiction, she started a new project with her wife, TV producer Linda Wallem.

Watch the full episode of People Features: Melissa Etheridge streaming now on PeopleTV.com, or download the PeopleTV app on your favorite device.

Magdalena Wosinska Melissa Etheridge

RELATED: Melissa Etheridge Reveals She Felt 'Helpless' as Son Battled Addiction Before Fatal Opioid Overdose: 'You Can't Make Them Be Sober'

"I told Linda, 'I'm going out in the garage, and I'm going to change that into a studio.' She looked at me like I was crazy, but she kept coming out here everyday with me. It took us about four weeks to build it all," says the singer-songwriter, who launched her at-home streaming service Etheridge TV in June.

The project gave Etheridge purpose in one of the darkest times of her life. Performing during the pandemic and connecting with fans has been "very healing for me," she says

Magdalena Wosinska Melissa Etheridge

Through the subscription-based streaming service, Etheridge airs five live shows weekly: a cover show (Tuesdays), a chat show with Wallem (Wednesdays), "Mamma's Choice" of her own music (Thursdays) and a behind-the-scenes look at old concerts and videos (Fridays).

"It's fun," Etheridge says. "I really enjoy interacting with the fans. There are people who've been alone for eight months that watch us five days a week that we connect with, and it does as much for me and my wife as it does for them."

Melissa Etheridge/Instagram Linda Wallem and Melissa Etheridge

And even after the pandemic ends, Etheridge thinks it will continue.

"Etheridge TV is probably something we'll do even after I go back on the road; we'll take it with us," she says. "We'll find a way to stay connected.

For more on Melissa Etheridge, pick up the latest issue of PEOPLE, on newsstands everywhere Friday.