Marc Forster And Producing Partner Renée Wolfe Developing Adaptation Of Neil Gaiman’s ‘The Graveyard Book’ At Disney

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EXCLUSIVE: Walt Disney Studios adaptation of Neil Gaiman’s The Graveyard Book is gearing up as Marc Forster is set to direct the pic. His producing partner Renée Wolfe will produce through their 2Dux2 banner along with Gil Netter. Ben Browning is also producing. David Magee was recently tapped to adapt the script.

The best-selling novel was published in 2008 and won several prestigious literary awards, including the American Newberry Medal. Gaiman’s source material tells the story of Nobody “Bod” Owen, a young boy who is raised by the ghosts and supernatural beings of a graveyard – including, the graveyard’s caretaker Silas – after his family is murdered.

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Disney, Forster and Wolfe already had strong ties after working together on the Winnie Pooh live-action pic, Christopher Robin, which 2Dux2 also produced.

Forster is currently in post-production on two films he produced and he directed, White Bird, the sequel to the beloved coming of age story, Wonder, written by R. J. Palacio and starring Helen Mirren and Gillian Anderson and A Man Called Otto starring Tom Hanks for Sony Pictures. Wolfe exec produced both those films.

For Magee, this marks a reunion with Forster having penned the script to Finding Neverland as well as the upcoming A Man Called Otto.

Forster, Wolfe and 2Dux2 are repped by WME and Linda Lichter.

 

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