The Mandalorian 's Pedro Pascal Admits to 'Cooing a Little Bit' When He Met Baby Yoda

Nigel Smith
·2 min read

Pedro Pascal, the man behind Mando's mask in Disney+'s hit show The Mandalorian, fell in love with the Child, a.k.a. Baby Yoda, before the rest of the world.

In PEOPLE's latest issue, the Chilean-American actor, 45, reveals he was "immediately convinced" to make the series after seeing an illustration of the adorable green alien. He was so smitten upon first meeting Baby Yoda that he admits to "cooing a little bit" on set.

"I'd then have conversations in the same way that we did when we were kids with our own little toys," Pascal says. "It has everything to do with the amount of work that these people have put into it, because it's a very, very special creation, and it feels as such when you see it in person."

As the planet-hopping bounty hunter at the center of The Mandalorian, Pascal masks his good looks in armor, able to express himself only through his movements and voice.

  • For more on Pedro Pascal, pick up this week's issue of PEOPLE

Frazer Harrison/Getty Pedro Pascal

RELATED: Disney Is Releasing a 1,000-Piece Baby Yoda Lego Set to Celebrate The Mandalorian Season 2

"The general rule is the better it looks, the more uncomfortable it is," he says of his futuristic costume. "It's a delicious kind of detailed, technical and at times surgical work, but it ends up looking so good that it turns out to be worth it."

As was previously revealed, Baby Yoda could have looked much less, well, cute.

An episode of a behind-the-scenes documentary series about the creation of the Star Wars spin-off series discusses the creation and practical effects of The Child.

"We all, I think, had a vision for what a bad version of it was," director Jon Favreau says in episode 5 of Disney Gallery/ Star Wars: The Mandalorian. "And what was written in there was just that it was a little baby of Yoda's species."

"We got lots and lots of drawings. Some of them were too cute, some of them were too ugly, some of them were the wrong proportions," Favreau adds.

Early designs revealed in the episode show The Child as far more wrinkly and haggard-looking than the final, adorable result that the Internet fell in love with.

The docuseries also explains that the production team used a remote-controlled puppet for much of the show, rather than CGI — which only added to The Child's magic and magnetism.

The Mandalorian is now streaming on Disney+.