Malcolm Cecil, the Producer Behind Grammy-Winning Stevie Wonder Albums and TONTO Synth, Dies at 84

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Malcolm Cecil has died.

On Sunday, the Bob Moog Foundation announced that Cecil, the music producer who co-created the TONTO, the largest analog synth in the world, died earlier that morning after facing "a long illness." He was 84.

"It is with the heaviest of hearts that we share the passing of the legendary creative genius, musician, engineer, producer, & synthesizer pioneer, Malcolm Cecil, show here w his creation TONTO," the foundation tweeted. "He passed away today at 1:17am after a long illness."

His cause of death was not revealed.

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Cecil's invention, shortened TONTO from the Original New Timbral Orchestra, alongside partner Bob Margouleff was key in the production of several iconic artists' albums, including Diana Ross, Quincy Jones, the Isley Brothers, Bobby Womack and Joan Baez.

He also worked with Marguleff as TONTO's Expanding Head Band, a project based solely on using the synthesizer.

The London-born producer also worked closely with Stevie Wonder, with whom he produced several records, including Music of My Mind, Talking Book, Innervisions and Fulfillingness' First Finale.

Cecil would go on to win the Grammy for best engineered recording for his work on Innervisions while both Innervisions and Fulfillingness' First Finale winning album of the year at the 1974 and 1975 Grammy Awards, respectively.

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