Ma$e Blasts Diddy For Underpayment, Refutes Fivio Foreign’s Record Deal Claims

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Ma$e appeared on the latest episode of the Million Dollaz Worth of Game podcast and spoke candidly about his ongoing issues with Diddy. The former Bad Boy artist accused his former CEO and collaborator of never paying him his full worth or giving him the respect his contributions to Bad Boy Records merited.

While speaking with cohosts Gillie Da King and Wallo, the rapper turned pastor—who fired shots at Diddy on his most recent musical release “Oracle 2: Standing on Bodies”—delved into where the bad blood between them began.

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“I felt like I did more than I got credit for, more than what I got paid for,” Ma$e said of his tenure at Bad Boy Records. “I never got paid what I was worth, and I never got the respect I was worth. So, this disdain that I got for Puff is more like you trying to keep me here, ni**a [motions with hand to indicate him being on a lower level].” He added, “I’m not here, all my peers are up here. All my peers are bosses.”

After appearing on multiple commercial hits from Bad Boy Records, Ma$e says he was the label’s chief songwriter in the wake of The Notorious B.I.G.’s death, whereas Diddy simply orchestrated which artists would record which parts of the songs. “Puff would go out and party, and I would be in the studio writing the records, but I was the person there creating it all; I mean from the lyrical standpoint.”

One example the Harlemite uses to drive home his point is Biggie’s 1997 hit “Mo Money Mo Problems,” which features Ma$e and Diddy and was released as part of The Notorious B.I.G.’s posthumous sophomore album, Life After Death. The song topped the Billboard Hot 100 for two consecutive weeks and received a Grammy nomination for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group in 1998.

“And even ‘Mo Money Mo Problems,’ I came up with that,” Ma$e said. “I came up with the beat, too. So, just imagine all of these moments that are taken from you. The records, the beats. You ain’t getting the money, you ain’t getting the publishing, and you ain’t getting the respect. And I don’t think you like that, to be pulling what you pulling.”

He concluded, “You know what would come with doing that, but everybody is letting you get away with it. So, me quitting after one album, it didn’t take long for me to figure it out. You’re not paying me, and you’re not respecting me.”

Earlier in the interview, Ma$e also responded to comments made by Brooklyn rapper Fivio Foreign, who is signed to Columbia Records through Ma$e’s RichFish Records, about their business relationship.

During his own sitdown with Million Dollaz Worth of Game, Fivio claimed that Ma$e only gave him a bonus of $5,000 upon signing with the label and insinuated he was taken advantage of due to his lack of knowledge of the music business. However, Ma$e countered that allegation, claiming he helped Fivio Foreign walk away with $700,000 from his record deal Columbia Records while he received $800,000 himself.

Ma$e also says he was the one who insisted on doing a 50 percent split with Fivio to ensure he was properly compensated for the deal. Shawn “Tubby” Holiday, the former Head of Urban Music at Columbia, confirmed his claim by phone during the interview. While Ma$e says he doesn’t own any of Fivio’s publishing and that he gave him back all of the percentages he would’ve made from his touring and merchandise, he subtly revealed that he still owns Fivio’s master recordings but was coy on the topic when asked directly. Ma$e revealed that Fivio’s comments may have potentially put some of his current musical and business endeavors in jeopardy but maintains he still has love for the “What’s My Name” rapper.

Watch Ma$e’s Million Dollaz Worth of Game interview below.

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