Lizzo Describes 'Cancel Culture' as 'Appropriation,' Says Term Has 'Become Trendy' and 'Misdirected'

SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA - DECEMBER 06: 2022 PEOPLE'S CHOICE AWARDS -- Pictured: Honoree Lizzo accepts The People's Champion award on stage during the 2022 People's Choice Awards held at the Barker Hangar on December 6, 2022 in Santa Monica, California. --  (Photo by Rich Polk/E! Entertainment/NBC via Getty Images)
SANTA MONICA, CALIFORNIA - DECEMBER 06: 2022 PEOPLE'S CHOICE AWARDS -- Pictured: Honoree Lizzo accepts The People's Champion award on stage during the 2022 People's Choice Awards held at the Barker Hangar on December 6, 2022 in Santa Monica, California. -- (Photo by Rich Polk/E! Entertainment/NBC via Getty Images)

Rich Polk/E! Entertainment/NBC Lizzo

Lizzo is sharing her thoughts on "cancel culture."

In a tweet shared on Sunday, the "About Damn Time" singer-songwriter spoke about the widely-used term and how it's developed within public consciousness since its origin.

"This may be a random time to say this but it's on my heart.. cancel culture is appropriation," wrote Lizzo, 34.

"There was real outrage from truly marginalized people and now it's become trendy, misused and misdirected," continued the Grammy winner's post. "I hope we can phase out of this & focus our outrage on real problems."

RELATED: Andrew Cuomo Talks of God's Plan, Blames 'Cancel Culture' for Political Downfall in Speech at Brooklyn Church

This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Update your settings here to see it.

Underneath the tweet, many fans agreed with Lizzo's take on the matter. "Cancel culture is being used and twisted and co-opted by people who just want to bully," wrote one Twitter user. "Most people in 2023 know that bullying is wrong, but they know they can get away with it if they dress it up as moral outrage. It's RAMPANT in fan culture and completely disingenuous."

Another person replied to the "Truth Hurts" performer, wondering if "cancel culture" truly even exists. "The term is mostly brought up/misused by those who are afraid of facing accountability. The other side of it is still, as you say, marginalized groups trying to hold oppressors accountable," they wrote. "Using a catchphrase to attain that goal is the least of our worries."

RELATED: Pope Francis Says Cancel Culture 'Leaves No Space for Freedom of Expression'

Lizzo visits SiriusXM's 'The Howard Stern Show' at SiriusXM Studios on December 12, 2022 in Los Angeles, California.
Lizzo visits SiriusXM's 'The Howard Stern Show' at SiriusXM Studios on December 12, 2022 in Los Angeles, California.

Emma McIntyre/Getty Lizzo

Lizzo isn't the only celebrity to speak publicly about "cancel culture" as of late. In an October 2022 interview with PEOPLE, comedian Amber Ruffin explained how canceling a celebrity for something controversial doesn't always impact their career in the way some would expect.

"I think, most of the time, people get canceled because that is the consequences for their actions," she said at the time. "And, you know, we're saying cancel, but that's not true."

In her experience, Ruffin believed not everyone who gets "canceled" actually stays canceled. She referenced Kanye West's recent antisemitic comments — which have led to financial fallout from brand partnerships upended — as one cancellation that could stick.

RELATED: Comedian Amber Ruffin Says 'Cancellations' in Comedy 'Aren't Sticking' Because People 'Move On'

THE AMBER RUFFIN SHOW -- "October 8, 2021" Episode 201 -- Pictured: Amber Ruffin
THE AMBER RUFFIN SHOW -- "October 8, 2021" Episode 201 -- Pictured: Amber Ruffin

Heidi Gutman/Peacock/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Amber Ruffin

"Ain't nobody being canceled except maybe Kanye. Geez," she said. "He might be the only one true canceling, cause damn."

But even in the comedy community, those canceled don't stay down too long, Ruffin said. She referenced Louis C.K., who was "canceled" in 2017 after sexual misconduct allegations against him surfaced. However, despite public outrage at the comedian's behavior (which he later admitted to and apologized for), he has since re-entered the comedy scene.

"A lot of those people that we canceled a minute ago, they're [on] tour and s—, she continued. "Louis C.K. is on tour, people are fine. These cancellations, these cancelings are not sticking. So I think people are experiencing consequences for their actions and then they're moving on."