What will King Charles's reign be called?

The monarch will be crowned at an ancient ceremony at Westminster Abbey

King Charles III on a walkabout outside Buckingham Palace
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King Charles's coronation this weekend will mark a new chapter in British history.

The death of his mother, Queen Elizabeth II, last year brought the second Elizabethan era to an end following a 70-year reign.

Having been heir apparent since he was three years old, Charles will be crowned at an ancient ceremony at Westminster Abbey this Saturday, 6 May.

But what this new era will become known as? Here is everything we know so far.

What will King Charles's reign be called?

In a speech after King Charles III ascended to the throne last September, then-prime minister Liz Truss said his reign marks a "new era of hope and progress, our new Carolean age".

The term Carolean, which was previously associated with Charles II, is derived from Carolus, the Latin for Charles. Charles I's time on the throne is usually referred to as the Caroline Age, based on the feminine form of the same adjective.

However, it's possible that future historians could use an entirely different name for the current time period, such as the 'Windsor era', or one that reflects the major events or social changes of the era.

King Charles III leaving Westminster Abbey in central London
Charles was free to pick his title when he became King. (Stefan Rousseau/PA Images via Getty Images)

Why is the King known as Charles III?

Charles was free to pick his own title when he became King. He could have chosen one of his three middle names – Philip, Arthur or George – but opted for his Christian name, just like his late mother Queen Elizabeth II.

There had been speculation in the past that Charles favoured the title George VII for historical reasons. After the House of Hanover came to power in 1714, Georges – from George I to George IV – ruled for 116 years in a row.

The name Charles is seen as historically jinxed by some in royal circles, because the reigns of Charles I (1625-1649) and Charles II (1660-1685) saw the overthrow and restoration of the monarchy, the Great Fire of London, and the Plague.

Charles I is the only British monarch to have been executed for treason, while Charles II was exiled and fathered at least 13 illegitimate children.

Picking the title Charles III, however, maintains continuity after he spent seven decades as Prince Charles.