Kellyanne Conway Dodges Divorce Questions from Gayle King, Says She and Husband Don't Wear Wedding Rings

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·3 min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
Kellyanne Conway
Kellyanne Conway

Courtesy CBS

Kellyanne Conway does not wear her wedding ring — and her husband of over 20 years, George Conway, does not wear his, either, she was quick to note.

In a sit-down interview with the hosts of CBS Mornings Tuesday, the former senior adviser to President Donald Trump chatted enthusiastically about her hopes for another Trump White House in the future, and her pride in the Trump-Pence administration. But when questions about her husband arose, she declined to give a straight answer.

There to speak about her new memoir, Here's the Deal, which provides a rare look into her marriage with her attorney husband — who became an outspoken opponent of Trump — Conway, 55, expertly avoided answering any questions pertaining to her marriage.

"The man you thought had your back ended up stabbing you in the back," host Gayle King read, quoting Conway's book, in an effort to learn more about what the marriage looks like today.

"Isn't that unfortunate," Conway replied. "I think women can relate to that. But this was next level."

RELATED: Kellyanne Conway Writes in Book of Husband 'Cheating by Tweeting' and Ivanka Trump Suggesting Couples Therapy

She added that "George Conway's vows are not to Donald Trump. He doesn't owe loyalty or fealty to a political party or a certain president. That was to me and to honor and cherish."

King, 67, then followed up, asking: "As you sit here today, did your marriage survive?" Conway shared that she and her husband spent the Memorial Day weekend with their four children.

She went on to share examples of times her husband spoke out against the Trump administration publicly in ways that she said were meant to "make her uncomfortable."

"Why wasn't I given the courtesy of being told ahead of time, tomorrow — of having George tell me, 'My op-ed is going to be in the New York Times, the Washington Post. I'm in the Lincoln Project now, we're going to have a new ad skewering your boss,'" she said.

The hosts were quick to shift gears from that, instead noticing the lack of a wedding ring on Conway's left hand. "You're not wearing a ring now, as we sit here," host Tony Dokoupil acknowledged.

"He doesn't either," Conway replied with a smile.

RELATED: Kellyanne Conway Fears Her Marriage to Anti-Trump Husband Won't Survive: 'Love Comes with Respect'

Kellyanne Conway; George
Kellyanne Conway; George

Matt Rourke/AP/REX/Shutterstock From left: Kellyanne Conway and George Conway in January 2017

As the interview came to an end, with Conway confidently sharing her hopes of returning to work in the White House under Trump, King made one last effort to get a clear answer from her about her marriage.

"Are you and George Conway together, Kellyanne?" she asked, chuckling as Conway continued avoiding the topic. "Kellyanne, you're not answering the question. I have many questions."

The former campaign manager ended the conversation by thanking the hosts for reading the book and for having her on the show.

Conway previously described the book to PEOPLE as "a chunky 600 pages, double the length of many books in the genre." She said she "loved writing it."

In the afterword of Here's the Deal, Conway writes of her husband, "I will be ever grateful to have built a life and a family together. Nothing can change or touch that. George has been kind and generous to my family, who is his family, too. Come what may, the ugliness of differing politics is no match for the beauty of shared parenthood. Take it from me."

After leading Trump's 2016 presidential campaign — and becoming the first woman to run a winning presidential campaign — then joining his team at the White House, Conway voluntarily departed from her position in 2020 in order to spend more time with her family.

Her publisher described her as "untouched by any of the major scandals or investigations of the administration."