Justice Clarence Thomas Will Not Teach Con Law at GWU This Fall After Students Petitioned to Fire Him

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Clarence Thomas
Clarence Thomas

ERIN SCHAFF/POOL/AFP via Getty Images Clarence Thomas

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, 74, will not return to George Washington University Law School as a professor this fall.

The decision comes a month after Justice Thomas penned a concurring opinion in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization, which overturned the constitutional right to abortion.

Thomas's ruling led to campus outcry that culminated in more than 11,000 community members signing a petition requesting his removal from the university and calling his employment "completely unacceptable." George Washington University officials declined to remove Thomas over the petition or his views.

RELATED: In Concurring Opinion, Justice Clarence Thomas Writes Court 'Should Reconsider' Rulings Legalizing Gay Marriage and Birth Control

On Wednesday, Gregory Maggs, the George Washington University Law School professor who co-taught the constitutional law seminar with Thomas since 2011, wrote to the student body in an email, "Justice Thomas has informed me that he is unavailable to co-teach the seminar this fall."

"The seminar has not been canceled but I will now be the sole instructor," Maggs wrote in the school-wide email.

RELATED: Samuel L. Jackson Calls Out Clarence Thomas for Leaving Interracial Marriage Off List of Targets

After the Dobbs Supreme Court decision last month, GW Provost Christopher Bracey and law Dean Dayna Bowen Matthew, wrote an email to the student body noting that while Thomas' views "do not represent" the university's stance, his contract will not be terminated.

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"Just as we affirm our commitment to academic freedom, we affirm the right of all members of our community to voice their opinions and contribute to the critical discussions that are foundational to our academic mission," the university leaders wrote in the email earlier this month.