Johnny Depp and Amber Heard's legal teams deliver closing arguments: Here are the key takeaways

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Lawyers for Johnny Depp and Amber Heard made their final courtroom arguments on Friday. All that's left now is for the jury to deliberate and come to a verdict in the multi-million-dollar defamation case. Depp is suing Heard for $50 million over a 2018 Washington Post op-ed detailing her experiences with domestic abuse that he says damaged his career, and Heard is counter-suing for $100 million, claiming that his denials of her accusations have in turn damaged her career.

Depp's legal team went first on Friday. Camille Vasquez repeatedly called Heard a liar and went even further to say that the Aquaman actress committed an act "of profound cruelty" by claiming to be a representative of domestic abuse survivors when Depp's team alleges she is no such thing.

"MeToo is an important movement, but it's for true survivors, not Ms. Heard," argued Ben Chew, another Depp lawyer, during his part of the closing argument.

Chew argued that no other former partners of Depp have come forward with their own abuse claims, though some of them have appeared in the trial: Ellen Barkin testified that Depp was "controlling" and "jealous" when they dated in the '90s but said he did not physically harm her. Kate Moss called in to deny rumors that Depp pushed her down stairs or otherwise harmed her. Depp's team made much of Moss' contributions during closing arguments, calling her a "private person" who has never testified in court before.

Both sides have made many claims throughout the trial. In his closing, Heard's lawyer Ben Rottenborn argued that for the jury to side with his client, they just have to decide that Depp abused Heard even once — because in that case, her op-ed would not be defamatory. He replayed video footage taken by Heard of an erratic Depp slamming cabinets in their kitchen and yelling at her.

Although Depp doesn't physically attack Heard in the video, Rottenborn argued that domestic abuse can be emotional and verbal in addition to physical. Heard's lawyer also cited multiple examples of Depp referring to himself as a "monster," a description Rottenborn said is proven by the video.

In her rebuttal, Vazquez took the opposite rhetorical approach, telling the jury that "you either believe all of it or none of it."

"What we have is a mountain of unproven allegations that are wild, over-the-top, and implausible. You can't pick and choose which to believe," Vazquez argued. "Either Mr. Depp sexually assaulted Ms. Heard with a bottle in Australia, or Ms. Heard got up on that stand, in front of all of you, and made up that horrific tale of abuse. Either she's a victim of truly horrific abuse or she is a woman who is willing to say absolutely anything."

Heard went on The Late Late Show with James Corden the day after first accusing Depp of abuse. Depp's team has used the fact that Heard had no visible injuries during her appearance to claim it was all a hoax. Heard testified that she wore heavy makeup to cover the injuries that day, which her makeup artist Melanie Inglessis corroborated in a pre-recorded deposition. Rottenborn contended in his closing that abuse can happen even without evidence.

"She would have to be the dumbest person in the world to say 'I'm gonna commit an abuse hoax, but let's do it the day before I go on national television,' Rottenborn said of his client. "You heard Melanie Iglesias, her makeup artist, testify in great detail about exactly what she did to cover up those bruises."

Now it's up to the jury to decide which side is telling the truth.

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