John Corbett Reveals Aidan Will Be Part of the ‘Sex and the City’ Reboot

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Ryan Lattanzio
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Page Six has learned that John Corbett, also known as furniture designer and Carrie Bradshaw’s doting ex Aidan Shaw, will be a recurring player in the upcoming reboot of “Sex and the City” on HBO Max. The actor featured majorly in Seasons Three and Four of the original series and bizarrely in the 2010 sequel movie “Sex and the City 2” during The Girls’ poorly conceived jaunt to Abu Dhabi. While HBO hasn’t confirmed Corbett’s casting, the actor said, “I’m going to do the show.”

Corbett isn’t sure how many episodes of the upcoming 10 he will star in, but he did say, “I think I might be in quite a few,” adding, “I like all those people, they’ve been very nice to me.”

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What exactly “Sex and the City” will look like circa 2021 is starting to take shape, but with two major characters missing from the reboot: Chris Noth’s Mr. Big, whom Carrie was last seen married to in “Sex and the City 2,” and more controversially, Kim Cattrall as the sex-positive comic relief of the series, Samantha Jones.

Sarah Jessica Parker, Cynthia Nixon, and Kristin Davis will all be returning to the reboot as Carrie, Miranda, and Charlotte, respectively, and they’re joined by writer Michael Patrick King as well as scribes from “Shrill,” “Fresh Off the Boat,” “Parks and Recreation,” and “Tuca & Bertie.” Cattrall has long been vocal about never wanting to return to Darren Star’s beloved franchise, so HBO Max has to get creative about how it will explain the fan-favorite character’s absence and Big’s as well.

As for Samantha Jones’ exit, HBO content chief Casey Bloys recently said, “Just as in real life, people come into your life, people leave. Friendships fade, and new friendships start. So I think it is all very indicative of the real stages, the actual stages of life… They’re trying to tell an honest story about being a woman in her 50s in New York. So it should all feel somewhat organic, and the friends that you have when you’re 30, you may not have when you’re 50.”

Boys said that Parker and writer/director Michael Patrick King “didn’t want to tell a story with all-white writers or an all-white cast… It’s not reflective of New York. So they are being very, very conscious about understanding that New York has to reflect the way New York looks today.”

“And Just Like That” is expected to go into production later this year.

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