Joe Rogan Responds to Backlash Against His Vaccine Comments: ‘I’m a F------ Moron’

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The Joe Rogan Experience/Youtube

Joe Rogan is setting the record straight that he's not an anti-vaxxer after his controversial remarks that young, healthy people don't need to get the COVID-19 vaccine.

The 53-year-old host of his popular Spotify podcast, The Joe Rogan Experience, recently faced backlash after his comments about getting vaccinated earlier this week.

"If you're like 21 years old and you say to me, 'Should I get vaccinated,' I say no … If you're a healthy person, and you're exercising all the time and you're young and you're eating well, I don't think you need to worry about this," he declared on his show.

Now, Rogan is retracting he statements. "I'm not an anti-vaxx person. In fact, I said I believe they're safe and I encourage many people to take them," he said. "I just said I don't think that if you're a young healthy person you need it."

"Their argument was that you need it for other people … that makes more sense," Rogan added. "But that's a different conversation."

RELATED: Fauci Slams Joe Rogan's Claim That Young People Don't Need to Get Vaccinated: 'That's Incorrect'

On Wednesday, Dr. Anthony Fauci spoke to Savannah Guthrie on Today and said the podcast host's claims were "incorrect," emphasizing that even those who are healthy can "inadvertently and innocently infect someone else."

"I'm not a doctor. I'm a f---ing moron," Rogan said, pointing out that he doesn't typically think before speaking during his podcast. "I'm not a respected source of information even for me. But I at least try to be honest about what I'm saying."

Rogan also revealed that he was actually scheduled to take the Johnson & Johnson vaccine himself, saying the UFC had allocated a number of vaccines for their employees. However, his appointment was cancelled after Johnson & Johnson's vaccine was briefly pulled due to a rare blood clotting condition.

As of April 26, nearly 54% of the U.S. adult population has received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 95,408,925 are now fully vaccinated, according to CDC data.

The CDC recently announced new guidelines that fully vaccinated people can safely go outdoors without a mask, as long as they're not in large crowds of people at venues like concerts or stadiums.