Jimmy Kimmel Tells MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell 'I Worry About You' amid Baseless Push Against 2020 Election

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
Sean Neumann
·3 min read
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.

Jimmy Kimmel Live/YouTube Mike Lindell

Jimmy Kimmel interrupted a chaotic interview on Wednesday night with controversial MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell to say he's worried about the TV salesman's mental health.

"I worry about you," Kimmel, 53, told Lindell, 59, while the pair discussed Lindell's months-long publicity campaign to expose non-existent conspiracies about the 2020 election.

"I feel like you are maybe self-destructive," Kimmel said. "You have lost everything repeatedly so many times in your life — you had a bar, all these things, you know the story."

"Yeah, I lived it," Lindell shrugged back, seeming to gesture that he understood Kimmel's concern.

Lindell's tumultuous life story includes lengthy addiction battles with crack and cocaine, multiple failed bars and restaurants, a carpet cleaning business, a divorce and the loss of his home. He then became a millionaire off the success of his unhinged late-night infomercials for MyPillow, quit drugs, and then found religion — and Donald Trump, who he previously told PEOPLE, he believes, was chosen by God to become president.

RELATED: Federal Investigators Execute Search Warrant on Rudy Giuliani's N.Y.C. Apartment: Reports

Lindell confoundingly became a central figure in Trump's relentless push to overturn his 2020 election loss, pointing to baseless conspiracy theories that have repeatedly been proven to be false.

Dominion Voting Systems, who Lindell has repeatedly claimed (without evidence) is behind the unfounded conspiracy, is suing the pillow salesman for $1.3 billion.

"I don't think there's any validity to any of this stuff that you're saying," Kimmel told Lindell, adding, "A lot of these ideas you espouse, I think you could potentially draw a line from those to the riot we had at the Capitol where people were killed."

Lindell listened and disagreed, but their conversation never turned angry. A Kimmel staffer even came on stage dressed up as Lindell near the end of the interview and began to mock him, causing both Kimmel and his guest to laugh at the performance.

But while Kimmel's controversial interview with Lindell had both men laughing, the late-night host also painted a concerning picture for his guest, expressing concern that Lindell has paranoia stemming from years of drug use and patterns of "self-destructive" behavior.

Lindell said he's had "many, many, many" threats, after Kimmel explained to the audience that the MyPillow salesman has "been in hiding" for months because Lindell was "worried someone was trying to kill" him.

"You did a lot of stuff," Kimmel said, running through the chapters of Lindell's life — from gambling and drug addictions, multiple arrests, and his failed business ventures.

"And then you fell in love with Donald Trump and here we are, correct? Did I miss anything?" Kimmel asked after listing off the hectic periods of Lindell's life.

Lindell told the host he hadn't missed anything except for failing to mention his religious awakening in 2009, which helped him recover from addiction.

Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Mike Lindell

RELATED: Jane Krakowski Denies MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell Romance, Jokes She's Actually Dating Brad Pitt

Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Mike Lindell

Kimmel's invitation to have Lindell on the show was not without controversy, he noted.

The Daily Beast published a column earlier Wednesday criticizing Kimmel for having Lindell on the air, accusing the late-night host of being "unwilling" to confront his guests about past controversies — including claims like Lindell's, which actively undermine democracy.

"A lot of people didn't want you to come on the show," Kimmel said to Lindell. "Liberals and conservatives, everybody told me don't have you on the show, and they told you, 'Don't go on the show.' "

"But I think it's important that we talk to each other," Kimmel told Lindell, who agreed.

If you or someone you know need mental health help, text "STRENGTH" to the Crisis Text Line at 741-741 to be connected to a certified crisis counselor.