Inside Out 2 ! Pixar Announces Sequel to 2015 Movie About Emotions — with a Teenage Twist

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NSIDE OUT, from left: Anger (voice: Lewis Black), Disgust (voice: Mindy Kaling), Joy (voice: Amy Poehler), Fear (voice: Bill Hader), Sadness (voice: Phyllis Smith), 2015.
NSIDE OUT, from left: Anger (voice: Lewis Black), Disgust (voice: Mindy Kaling), Joy (voice: Amy Poehler), Fear (voice: Bill Hader), Sadness (voice: Phyllis Smith), 2015.

Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures/Courtesy Everett Collection Inside Out (2015)

Things are about to get emotional again.

Disney's Pixar announced plans for a sequel to 2015's Inside Out, which personified the many emotions inside a young girl's head, as the original movie's director Pete Docter and voice star Amy Poehler made an appearance at D23 to celebrate the news, according to Deadline.

Whereas the first movie followed the emotions of a young girl named Riley as her family moves to San Francisco, Poehler, 50, said the sequel will "take place inside Riley's head, only this time she's a teenager," with a whole new crop of teenage emotions.

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Set for a summer 2024 release, Kelsey Mann will helm the new installment with a script from returning screenwriter Meg LeFauve.

The first Inside Out was nominated for Best Original Screenplay and won the Oscar for Best Animated Feature. The voice cast included Poehler as Joy, Bill Hader as Fear, Lewis Black as Anger, Mindy Kaling as Disgust and Phyllis Smith as Sadness.

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Docter previously told Entertainment Weekly in June 2015 that they didn't have sequel plans at the time. "There's no sequel idea from me at this point," he said. "Never say never."

Also in 2015, Poehler spoke to The Guardian about the film's message and why it's relevant to all ages.

"Pete did a beautiful job of not only reminding everyone of how difficult it is and emotionally treacherous it is to grow up and to leave childhood behind, but that our constant pursuit of happiness as human beings and as parents sometimes gets in the way of real growth," she said.

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"It's okay to be sad, and it's okay to have feelings that aren't maybe the ones that you thought you were supposed to have or are what are expected of you," continued Poehler. "It's this beautiful attempt at taking this very big intellectual idea and making it this very small, human, connecting experience."