Hillary Clinton Is 'Tired' of Telling Critics That She Had 'Zero' Classified Emails on Private Server

·3 min read
Hillary Clinton
Hillary Clinton

JEWEL SAMAD/AFP via Getty Hillary Clinton

Hillary Clinton is setting the record straight about her "classified emails" — again.

The former secretary of state, 74, took to Twitter on Tuesday, refuting resurfaced allegations about her correspondence while in office.

"I can't believe we're still talking about this, but my emails…" Clinton tweeted.

She continued, "As Trump's problems continue to mount, the right is trying to make this about me again. There's even a 'Clinton Standard.' The fact is that I had zero emails that were classified."

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In another tweet, she said, "I'm more tired of talking about this than anyone, but here we are" — then directed her followers, or those who questioned her record, to read a story from last week in The National Memo which featured the headline "How Many of 'Her Emails' Were Classified? Actually, Zero."

A lengthy FBI investigation ultimately determined that Clinton's email server did not contain any classified information.

Yet as the Department of Justice investigation into former President Donald Trump alleged mishandling of classified documents continues, Clinton has been the targeted by many Trump supporters who are embracing "whataboutism" to try and redirect the conversation toward her.

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The search for the Trump administration's classified documents dates back more than a year. In May 2021, the National Archives (NARA) began reaching out to Trump's team, inquiring about missing presidential documents and asking that they be returned.

Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks at the "Hillary" press conference during the 70th Berlinale International Film Festival Berlin at Grand Hyatt Hotel on February 25, 2020 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Andreas Rentz/Getty Images); Donald Trump prepares to speak at the Conservative Political Action Conference CPAC held at the Hilton Anatole on August 06, 2022 in Dallas, Texas. CPAC began in 1974, and is a conference that brings together and hosts conservative organizations, activists, and world leaders in discussing current events and future political agendas. (Photo by Brandon Bell/Getty Images)
Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks at the "Hillary" press conference during the 70th Berlinale International Film Festival Berlin at Grand Hyatt Hotel on February 25, 2020 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Andreas Rentz/Getty Images); Donald Trump prepares to speak at the Conservative Political Action Conference CPAC held at the Hilton Anatole on August 06, 2022 in Dallas, Texas. CPAC began in 1974, and is a conference that brings together and hosts conservative organizations, activists, and world leaders in discussing current events and future political agendas. (Photo by Brandon Bell/Getty Images)

Andreas Rentz/Getty; Brandon Bell/Getty

The Washington Post reported that NARA's chief counsel wrote in an email to Trump attorneys: "It is also our understanding that roughly two dozen boxes of original presidential records were kept in the Residence of the White House over the course of President Trump's last year in office and have not been transferred to NARA, despite a determination by [former White House counsel] Pat Cipollone in the final days of the administration that they need to be."

After NARA informed the Department of Justice of the discovery, the FBI was granted access to the files, and despite Trump's team denying it was withholding more documents, 11 sets of classified documents were found after agents executed a search warrant last month at Trump's Palm Beach, Florida property.

RELATED: A Timeline of the DOJ's Investigation into How Donald Trump Has Handled Classified Documents

Also among the many boxes of items taken are binders of photos, an unspecified handwritten note and the executive grant of clemency for former Trump aide Roger Stone. The three-page list of items also shows that information about the president of France was collected. The receipt is signed by Trump attorney Christina Bobb.

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On Monday, a federal judge granted Trump's request for a special master to review evidence taken from Mar-a-Lago, which will temporarily halt the DOJ's access to the documents, according to CNN.