Grey's Anatomy 's Kim Raver on how Teddy and Owen are coping in season 17

Samantha Highfill
·3 min read

Gilles Mingasson via Getty Images

When Grey's Anatomy returns, Teddy (Kim Raver) is going to have a lot to deal with. Not only is the show incorporating COVID-19 into season 17, but let's not forget that season 16 ended with Owen (Kevin McKidd) finding out about Teddy and Koracick (Greg Germann). The question is: Is this the (real) end of Teddy and Owen?

EW spoke with Raver about filming during COVID and what's next for Teddy.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: What has the experience been like of filming a story about COVID-19 in the middle of the pandemic?

KIM RAVER: It's so surreal. You're putting on this full PPE and you're going through what the front liners are going through. And then the lines are coming out of your mouth, but you're looking at whoever you're working with at the time, and I'm like, "What is happening?" It's one thing if you're doing Contagion or whatever, where you're supposing that this happened, but we're actually playing what we're going through in the moment and that is really kind of incredible. Because we're a medical show, it's important to tell these stories. And I feel like, even me, I'm so interested in what is happening inside the hospitals. I'm hoping that there's also sort of a therapeutic thing of being able to watch the characters that people have been so invested in for so many years going through what we've all gone through.

My first reaction in thinking about how the doctors will handle this is that Teddy and Owen should theoretically be the most prepared. How are they handling things?

I think you're right that out of anyone, Teddy and Owen are kind of prepared for this because of their army training. You have to put everything on hold during this pandemic and just get everyone kind of to safety, so to speak. So I think that that's exactly the path that we're following. They have their huge, gaping wounds that Teddy caused. Then we have this pandemic and how are they facing it? And I think that that's also what's interesting about healthcare workers is that they put others first. And so many people, the real healthcare workers, were putting their kids and everything on hold and they were going into a war zone. It's an amazing storyline to be able to tell with Teddy and Owen and Koracick, how are they going to heal themselves? They're going to have to put the healthcare job first and saving others first and then simultaneously try to heal, if they can.

So how are Teddy and Owen coping with what went down at the end of last season?

We didn't mean to end right on Teddy just doing the worst thing possible. [Laughs] I think it's interesting that it's a woman going through this because there seems to be more forgiveness when it's a man. I know that the fans are very upset and I'm upset with Teddy. There's a universal thing of when you have what you want, the healthy people make it blossom, and the people that need work kind of blow it up. And I think we've all been there. It's so true to Grey's Anatomy that people are messy. Everyone is so messy. And I think that that is really the beautiful thing of the show is that they have their shining moments and then they have their very ugly human moments. And it's like, what are you going to do? Who are you going to be? Or who are you going to become?

Grey's Anatomy returns Thursday, Nov. 12 at 9 p.m. ET on ABC.

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