First Politician Involved in Jan. 6 Capitol Riots Is Removed from Office Following Judge's Ruling

·3 min read
Otero County, New Mexico Commissioner Couy Griffin speaks to reporters at federal court in Washington, . Griffin, who is a central figure in a New Mexico county's refusal to certify recent election results based on debunked conspiracy theories about voting machines, has avoided more jail time for joining the mob that attacked the U.S. Capitol.
Otero County, New Mexico Commissioner Couy Griffin speaks to reporters at federal court in Washington, . Griffin, who is a central figure in a New Mexico county's refusal to certify recent election results based on debunked conspiracy theories about voting machines, has avoided more jail time for joining the mob that attacked the U.S. Capitol.

Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP/Shutterstock

Cuoy Griffin, an Otero County, New Mexico, commissioner and founder of Cowboys for Trump, has been removed from office and disqualified from any future public office positions due to his involvement in the Jan. 6 capitol riots.

The decision was made final on Tuesday by New Mexico Judge Francis Matthew, court documents reveal.

The ruling was the result of a lawsuit in which plaintiffs urged for Griffin's removal under Section 3 of the 14th Amendment of the Constitution. The section states that "No person shall hold any office, civil or military, under the United States, or under any State, who, having previously taken an oath, as an officer of the United States, to support the Constitution of the United States, shall have engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the same."

RELATED: First Look: Chilling New Docuseries Explores How Fringe Conspiracy Theories Creep into Mainstream America

According to The Guardian, this is the first time since 1869 that this section has been used to remove some from office. The ruling also marks the first time a judge has formally called the riots an "insurrection," CNN reported.

In March, Griffin was convicted of trespassing on U.S. Capitol grounds during the insurrection. Soon after, in June, a D.C. federal judge sentenced Griffin to 14 days in jail with time served and one year of supervised release.

RELATED: Trump Says He'd Consider 'Full Pardons' of Capitol Rioters as President, Is Supporting Some Financially

A testimony in court not only confirmed the previous trespassing conviction, but claimed Griffin took a "leadership position" during the day including giving speeches and promoting the events on social media, Citizens for Ethics reported.

Following the attack, Griffin continued to defend the insurrection and went on to suggest a possible repeat of it in the future, the outlet reported.

Pro-Trump supporters and far-right forces flooded Washington DC to protest Trump's election loss. Hundreds breached the U.S. Capitol Building, aproximately 13 were arrested and one protester was killed.
Pro-Trump supporters and far-right forces flooded Washington DC to protest Trump's election loss. Hundreds breached the U.S. Capitol Building, aproximately 13 were arrested and one protester was killed.

Michael Nigro/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty

RELATED: Regretful Capitol Rioter Says Trump's Election Lies Had Him Hooked, Warns Believers to 'Take Blinders Off'

Judge Matthew wrote in the ruling: "The irony of Mr. Griffin's argument that this Court should refrain from applying the law and consider the will of the people in District Two of Otero County who retained him as a county commissioner against a recall effort as he attempts to defend his participation in an insurrection by a mob whose goal, by his own admission, was to set aside the results of a free, fair and lawful election by a majority of the people of the entire country (the will of the people) has not escaped this Court."

The New Mexico judge called Griffin's arguments "without merit and contrary to evidence," also noting that he provided "no evidence himself in his own defense." Matthew wrote, "His protestations and characterizations of his actions are not credible and amounted to nothing more than attempting to put lipstick on a pig."

Never miss a story — sign up for PEOPLE's free daily newsletter to stay up-to-date on the best of what PEOPLE has to offer, from juicy celebrity news to compelling human interest stories.

Following the ruling, Griffin reacted to the news to CNN. "I'm shocked. Just shocked," he said. "I really did not feel like the state was going to move on me in such a way. I don't know where I go from here."