It finally rained in South Texas. How does it affect the drought?

·2 min read

Don't put away your umbrellas yet.

Corpus Christi experiences heavy rain, Thursday, Oct. 14, 2021. The National Weather Service in Corpus Christi said 1.97 inches of rain fell in only one hour.
Corpus Christi experiences heavy rain, Thursday, Oct. 14, 2021. The National Weather Service in Corpus Christi said 1.97 inches of rain fell in only one hour.

After a weekend of downpours and thunderstorms, areas of South Texas could see up to 5 inches of rain through Monday evening with chances for showers continuing throughout the rest of the week, according to the National Weather Service in Corpus Christi.

In the Corpus Christi area, nearly 6 inches of rain was reported as of Sunday morning. Port Aransas, Corpus Christi's southside, Flour Bluff and the Naval Air Station received around 4 inches of rain, according to NWS precipitation reports collected by weather observers.

A flood watch was in effect on Monday as locally heavy rain continued in the Coastal Bend. Rain chances will continue on Tuesday and increase later in the week as another tropical disturbance moves into the area, according to the NWS.

Heavy rainfall was expected west of Highway 281 on Monday with 1-3 inches possible. The eastern areas will likely receive less than an inch. Maximum heat indices will increase from 105 to 109 degrees Tuesday through Saturday.

How does this affect the drought?

Despite the heavy rainfall, the National Weather Service in Corpus Christi says minimal amounts have landed in the Nueces River and Frio River watersheds, and most of the downpour has been well outside of the watershed.

Corpus Christi area reservoirs remain relatively unchanged. Lake Corpus Christi remained 43.1 percent full on Monday, only a slight dip from last week's 44 percent, according to the Texas Water Development Board. The Choke Canyon Reservoir was 33.9 percent full, compared to 34.1 percent the week prior.

Without significant change to the volume of water in the city's water sources, Corpus Christi will likely enter Stage 2 water restrictions in later August or early September. The city enacted its Stage 1 Mild Water Shortage Watch in mid-June, including restrictions on irrigation and sprinkler systems and hand watering. Stage 2 will further restrict irrigation and sprinkler systems, including industrial restrictions and possibly affect sports and entertainment fields.

Violators of city water restrictions could face fines up to $500 with municipal court citations.

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This article originally appeared on Corpus Christi Caller Times: How recent rains could affect the drought in South Texas