The FBI has questioned dozens of people about the killing of Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick

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Police officers salute during the procession for U.S. Capitol police officer, Brian D. Sicknick as they stand along Third Street SW on Sunday January 10, 2021 in Washington, DC.
Police officers salute during the procession for U.S. Capitol police officer, Brian D. Sicknick as they stand along Third Street SW on Sunday January 10, 2021 in Washington, DC. Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images
  • The FBI has questioned dozens people about the killing of Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, who died after being assaulted by the mob that stormed the Capitol last Wednesday.

  • Sicknick was a veteran who served in the National Guard before going into law enforcement.

  • Over the weekend, numerous police officers lined the streets in Washington, DC, to observe a procession for the fallen officer.

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The FBI has questioned dozens of people in connection with the killing of Capitol Police officer Brian Sicknick, The New York Times reported Friday.

Sicknick died last Thursday at the hospital, where he was being treated for "injuries sustained while on-duty," USCP said in a statement. More specifically, this officer was violently struck with a fire extinguisher during the pro-Trump riots at the Capitol on Wednesday.

An FBI memo obtained and reported by The New York Times said that the bureau is investigating 37 people in connection with Sicknick's death, which is also being looked into by local law enforcement in Washington, DC, as well as the US Capitol Police. The paper later reported that the FBI clarified its actions, stating that the original memo was inaccurate.

Michael Sherwin, the acting US attorney in DC, said Friday that US investigators have opened 275 criminal cases in connection with the Capitol riots, which were launched to derail congressional efforts to certify President-elect Joe Biden's victory in the 2020 presidential election. Nearly one hundred people have been charged, CNN reported.

Sicknick, a New Jersey native, joined his home state's National Guard in 1997, according to the Associated Press. In 2008, he joined the Capitol Police, serving until he was killed last week.

Over the weekend, numerous law enforcement officials from the Capitol and DC lined the streets for a procession for the fallen officer. The flags at federal buildings were also lowered to half-staff.

Rep. Elissa Slotkin, a Michigan Democrat, called on the US military to give Sicknick the same burial honors that members of the armed forces receive. "Officer Sicknick died in the line of duty as a US Capitol Police Officer but did so living up to the oath he swore in the military: to protect and defend the Constitution," she wrote in a request, according to the AP.

The secretary of the Army responded saying that he "fully supports the request for posthumous special honors and burial at Arlington National Cemetery."

Update: This post has been updated to reflect the FBI's clarification of its earlier memo that was obtained by The New York Times.

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