Dr. Dre Slams Marjorie Taylor Greene for Using His Song in a Video, Calls Her 'Divisive and Hateful'

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) speaks at an America First Rally also attended by Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) on May 27, 2021 in Dalton, Georgia. The two Republicans, among the most outspoken supporters of former President Donald Trump, are co-hosting a cross-country series of rallies. , Record producer Dr. Dre attends the Universal Pictures and Legendary Pictures' premiere of "Straight Outta Compton" at Microsoft Theater on August 10, 2015 in Los Angeles, California.
Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) speaks at an America First Rally also attended by Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) on May 27, 2021 in Dalton, Georgia. The two Republicans, among the most outspoken supporters of former President Donald Trump, are co-hosting a cross-country series of rallies. , Record producer Dr. Dre attends the Universal Pictures and Legendary Pictures' premiere of "Straight Outta Compton" at Microsoft Theater on August 10, 2015 in Los Angeles, California.

Megan Varner/Getty; Kevin Winter/Getty

Dr. Dre is speaking out after Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene used his music in a promo without his permission.

The Republican congresswoman from Georgia posted the video to her social media channels on Monday morning, in which she touts her seeming behind-the-scenes role in helping to elect House Speaker Kevin McCarthy — all pegged to the rapper's iconic 1999 hit "Still D.R.E."

Dre, 57, told TMZ he did not authorize the usage of the song.

"I don't license my music to politicians, especially someone as divisive and hateful as this one," he said.

In the short video, Greene can be seen slo-mo walking the halls of Congress in cowboy boots with her aides, and then taking a call from "DT," presumably former President Donald Trump.

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In a voiceover, a commentator can be heard describing McCarthy's "first act as speaker" as taking a selfie with Greene, who rushed down the aisle to corral him for a photo.

Alongside the video, Greene wrote: "It's time to begin.. and they can't stop what's coming."

RELATED: The Many, Many Musicians Who Have Told Politicians to Stop Using Their Songs

Trump, whom Greene has vehemently defended during her two years in Congress, has a history of using music for his own political gain.

Last month, Neal Schon of Journey accused keyboardist Jonathan Cain of damaging the band's "brand" by playing at Mar-a-Lago in November.

An attorney for Schon sent a cease and desist letter to Cain after he performed "Don't Stop Believin'" at Trump's Florida estate.

RELATED: Journey's Neal Schon and Jonathan Cain Bicker over Band's Music Playing at Trump Mar-a-Lago Event

Cain reportedly performed the hit, which famously capped The Sopranos series finale, at an event in which Greene, former Fox News personality Kimberly Guilfoyle and former Arizona gubernatorial candidate Kari Lake performed in a backing "chorus," per Variety.

The issue of soundtracking political endeavors has become a contentious one between the music industry and political figures in recent years.

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Rihanna, R.E.M., Steven Tyler, Adele, Pharrell Williams and Prince's estate are all among those who have sought to stop politicians, including Trump, from playing their music for political purposes.

Despite a given performer disputing the usage of his or her music, the issue has complicated legal implications.

Typically, a campaign will seek a public performance license from the copyright holder of the music, instead of the recording artist, intellectual property lawyer Danwill Schwender wrote in a scholarly article, per The Washington Post.

But according to the newspaper, the copyrights for most compositions — administered by the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) or Broadcast Music Inc.— (BMI) have provisions for artists who do not want their music used.