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Firefly 2022 debut: Rain didn't stop fans from having a sunny time in Dover

Liza Calnan of Newark, NJ takes in the dance music scene at The Nest as the Firefly music festival opens in Dover, Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022.
Liza Calnan of Newark, NJ takes in the dance music scene at The Nest as the Firefly music festival opens in Dover, Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022.

Festivalgoers near the main stage at Firefly looked tiny, like characters in a Godzilla movie on Day One of the festival on Thursday.

Fans looked so teeny because of a humongous new sculpture of a woman’s face that’s towering over folks in the festival grounds in The Woodlands of Dover.

That looming piece of art is in celebration of Firefly’s 10th anniversary, which kicked off Thursday and ends Sunday.

Thursday afternoon saw buckets of rain pouring down. But the water mostly stopped before gates were set to open at 3 p.m.

The show goes on:Firefly 2022 debut: Rain didn't stop fans from having a sunny time in Dover

Firefly 2022: 12 items you should add to your last-minute checklist

A festival-goer watches as Oliver Tree performs at the Firefly Music Festival, Saturday, Sept. 25, 2021 in Dover.
A festival-goer watches as Oliver Tree performs at the Firefly Music Festival, Saturday, Sept. 25, 2021 in Dover.

There were a bunch of new fans who received their wings at the Firefly Music Festival in The Woodlands of Dover last year.

It’s unclear if there will be a greater turnout of newcomers joining the Firefly family for the festival's 10th anniversary, which runs Thursday through Sunday.

But even veterans of The Woodlands can use a friendly, last-minute reminder about the items they’ll want to bring to the festival so they can have a better experience, before seeing headliners Halsey, My Chemical Romance, Green Day and Dua Lipa.

Firefly 2022: 12 items you should add to your last-minute checklist

Want to get tattooed at Firefly? Now you can ... professionally.

The tattoo shop at Firefly 2022 is run by the owner and artists from Artistic Additions, a studio in Dover.

Attendees interested in being tattooed could schedule a slot at the tattoo shop’s tent, which was set up by the cluster of non-profits nicknamed the Good Hub near the festival’s south entrance. Then, when it was their turn, festivalgoers chose from a set of more than 50 pre-drawn flash tattoo designs ranging from $100 to $200.

Tatted up:Want to get tattooed at Firefly? Now you can ... professionally.

🔒 Madison Sparrow's final days: How two people she once loved committed the ultimate betrayal

A graduation cap decorated in honor of Madison Sparrow (seen in photo) who was killed in 2020.
A graduation cap decorated in honor of Madison Sparrow (seen in photo) who was killed in 2020.

It's been two years since Madison Sparrow’s death rocked the Newark community.

As a trial for one of the suspects looms, we reviewed court records, transcripts and conducted interviews with Madison’s family and friends to reveal how her classmates, Noah Sharp and Annika Stalczynski, planned her death, what weapons they used and how they disposed of her body.

Madison Sparrow's final days:How two people she once loved committed the ultimate betrayal

Remembering Madison Sparrow: How a quiet girl selflessly loved those around her

Madison Sparrow is memorialized in photos in a display at Riverview Beach Park in Pennsville, NJ during a vigil there in her memory Thursday, Oct. 8, 2020.
Madison Sparrow is memorialized in photos in a display at Riverview Beach Park in Pennsville, NJ during a vigil there in her memory Thursday, Oct. 8, 2020.

Madison Sparrow stood beside a plastic fold-up table, boxes of Girl Scout cookies resting atop a makeshift tablecloth.

Clad in warm winter clothes and a Brownie vest identifying her as part of Troop 377, she smiled as her fellow third-graders attempted to attract buyers.

“Feed the horses hay!” the girls shouted from underneath a colorful banner that advertised their troop, the paper decorated with stickers. Hearts, smiley faces and peace signs drawn in marker filled in areas not covered by the sparkly decals.

“Hay for the horses!”

Madison was usually quiet, reserved around those she didn’t know well. But here with her friends — many of whom she would remain close with for years to come — she was boisterous, energized by the thought of ponies.

Remembering Madison Sparrow:How a quiet girl selflessly loved those around her

🔒 Art may help you face the climate crisis. Emerging writers speak to its adaptive powers

Writers examine how humans cope with the ongoing threat of climate change and process their own feelings about traumatic issues through their work.

We spoke to these writers as part of the USA TODAY Network project "Perilous Course" and learned how people can process feelings about traumatic issues through making and absorbing creative work.

Art will save us:Art may help you face the climate crisis. Emerging writers speak to its adaptive powers

🔒 He’s creating several football fields’ worth of shade in neighborhoods needing it the most

Kufa Castro in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, used his job to expand solutions in his town for a damaging situation — urban "heat island" effects — exacerbated by the climate crisis. Again and again, residents told him that heat was their top concern. Their No. 1 request: more trees.
Kufa Castro in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, used his job to expand solutions in his town for a damaging situation — urban "heat island" effects — exacerbated by the climate crisis. Again and again, residents told him that heat was their top concern. Their No. 1 request: more trees.

It took more than a program to get nearly 200 shade trees planted in the neighborhoods that needed them most. How did Kufa Castro help accomplish it?

Read about Castro and his effort as part of "Perilous Course," which focuses on the human response to climate crisis along the East Coast. Our search for understanding included experts and scientists but also regular people who were making a difference.

Planting a seed:He’s creating several football fields’ worth of shade in neighborhoods needing it the most

🔒 Some are students, activists. Some are just worried sick. Climate crisis is all they know.

Hyacinth Cox gets around Staunton on her 1978 Vespa Grande. The moped is extremely fuel efficient, averaging  120 miles to the gallon per Cox.
Hyacinth Cox gets around Staunton on her 1978 Vespa Grande. The moped is extremely fuel efficient, averaging 120 miles to the gallon per Cox.

Older generations are leaving them a planet in crisis, a place of rising seas, heat waves and extreme storms.

They grew up with no assumption that the world they were born into would be the same world when they were adults, never mind a better one. They're seeing the fields their parents used to play on flooding with polluted river water so often they can't enjoy the same games of careless youth.

In response, they're standing knee-deep in marshwater collecting scientific samples to understand how the environment's changing, pursuing new avenues of study like climate justice, getting out the vote as activists, flowing in a sea of human protesters demanding political action.

Or they're sitting in a class as their eyes glaze over, a sense of overwhelming despair making them wonder why they think a college degree will help them fit into a world of constantly diminishing promise, health and safety.

A Pew Research Center study from 2021 found that climate change is a top worry for Gen Z: 76 percent of respondents in that age group said it was one of their biggest societal concerns.

The USA TODAY Network interviewed young people as part of "Perilous Course," a collaborative examination of how people up and down the East Coast are grappling with the climate crisis.

Battling climate change:Some are students, activists. Some are just worried sick. Climate crisis is all they know.

🔒 Boston Tea Party rebels and shipwrecked souls rest here. The ocean had other ideas, though.

A ship anchor and chain ornament juts from an 1800s headstone in Cohasset Central Cemetery. Many of the early burials in the cemetery were people connected to the sea, like shipbuilders, seafarers and fishermen.
A ship anchor and chain ornament juts from an 1800s headstone in Cohasset Central Cemetery. Many of the early burials in the cemetery were people connected to the sea, like shipbuilders, seafarers and fishermen.

Located in a seaside village rooted in fishing and shipbuilding, Cohasset Central Cemetery in Massachusetts is one of countless places along the Atlantic seaboard where history and lineage are being claimed by the ocean, rivers and the consequences of extreme rainfall. New England is experiencing temperature warming and sea-level rise at a rate faster than the rest of the nation.

Flooding used to leave the ground around the gravestones sodden in seawater, seeping through dirt and root systems down into the dark earth to caskets and urns. The stones’ firm placement in the soil eroded.

Mary Nisula watched helplessly as her family’s plot flooded regularly, the same place she’ll be buried one day next to her son, parents and sister, all of whom died before her.

“I just wished I was in my urn so when the waves took the rest of them out, they took me, too,” she said.

It took a gargantuan effort on the part of the cemetery’s board of directors, but the march of floodwater from nearby Little Harbor has since been halted. But as to whether it will hold, only the ocean has a say.

Seas moving inland:Boston Tea Party rebels and shipwrecked souls rest here. The ocean had other ideas, though.

🔒 It’s everywhere: Sea-level rise’s surprising reach damaging more than East Coast shoreline

Sections of 2,200 feet of geotextile tubes installed in 2019 behind 13 private lots on Ponte Vedra Beach have been uncovered by erosion from a recent storm. St. Johns County Commission Chair Henry Dean hopes emergency rebuilding of the beach can protect its homes. The most lethal months of hurricane season are upon him. “Looking over the next 10-year horizon, even if they’re eroding faster, we need to do more beach renourishment, faster and better,” Dean said.
Sections of 2,200 feet of geotextile tubes installed in 2019 behind 13 private lots on Ponte Vedra Beach have been uncovered by erosion from a recent storm. St. Johns County Commission Chair Henry Dean hopes emergency rebuilding of the beach can protect its homes. The most lethal months of hurricane season are upon him. “Looking over the next 10-year horizon, even if they’re eroding faster, we need to do more beach renourishment, faster and better,” Dean said.

The rising sea reaches places you would not expect.

One tide gauge in the nation broke its record for high-tide flood days over the past year.

It was far inland, just outside Delaware City along Delaware Bay and about 20 miles from Wilmington, Delaware.

Places up and down the entire East Coast are menaced by sea-level rise’s impacts compounding the force of tides and storms: centuries of Black history, generations of businesses on Philadelphia’s Schuylkill River, headstones in colonial New England cemeteries, millennia of indigenous Florida heritage.

It’s everywhere:Sea-level rise’s surprising reach damaging more than East Coast shoreline

🔒 Rising seas will force North Carolina beach towns to move. The idea of leaving isn’t easy.

Glenda and Bill Browning talk about their old beach home at 469 E. Third St. in Ocean Isle Beach, North Carolina. The Atlantic Ocean is coming for it.
Glenda and Bill Browning talk about their old beach home at 469 E. Third St. in Ocean Isle Beach, North Carolina. The Atlantic Ocean is coming for it.

The science is clear. Parts of Ocean Isle Beach can’t be saved from sea-level rise amid a manmade climate crisis roiling the planet.

It is not alone. There are vulnerable places along the East Coast with working families who don't have the income or savings to weather what will happen to them from climate change. As a vacation or retirement spot for the upper middle class, this is not quite one of the of those places. But it is a town that captures the imagination of a region in the Carolinas, signifying a vacation or lifestyle dream for many.

Does it represent a particular kind of East Coast living that won't ever really be the same again?

Surging seas:Rising seas will force North Carolina beach towns to move. The idea of leaving isn’t easy.

Slots, table games, dining, shows, sports betting. Your guide to Delaware's casinos.

Maybe you've driven past one of Delaware's three casinos and wondered what they're like inside but you might be intimidated because you're not exactly sure how to play the games.

Well, here's a rundown of all the amenities at the casinos, the help available for new players and perhaps a few things you didn't know. For instance, there are restaurants and events you could take the whole family to, even though children aren't allowed in the gambling areas.

Or, did you know all three casinos were originally horse racing tracks, and that's what led to casinos being legalized in the state? The Horse Racing Redevelopment Act, passed in 1994, was designed to help the struggling horse racing industry by allowing slot machines, with a percentage of the slots money designated to help the race tracks. Later, table games were also permitted.

And be sure to pick up a player's card that's almost guaranteed to pay off on return trips.

Place your bets:Slots, table games, dining, shows, sports betting. Your guide to Delaware's casinos.

🔒 The climate future is now. Humans navigate a ‘Perilous Course’ on the East Coast.

Waves lap on the sides of the dome homes on Cape Romano in Collier County, Florida, in late June 2022. The homes were built on the beach on dry land in the early 1980s. Without ever moving, they now find themselves several hundred feet offshore. Erosion, hurricanes and strong tropical weather have contributed to the demise of the homes. Climate change is causing sea-level rise. Planners say that the homes should have never been built in this location due the changing landscape of barrier islands.
Waves lap on the sides of the dome homes on Cape Romano in Collier County, Florida, in late June 2022. The homes were built on the beach on dry land in the early 1980s. Without ever moving, they now find themselves several hundred feet offshore. Erosion, hurricanes and strong tropical weather have contributed to the demise of the homes. Climate change is causing sea-level rise. Planners say that the homes should have never been built in this location due the changing landscape of barrier islands.

People along the East Coast are feeling the climate crisis: in deadly heat, repeated floods, rising seas and shifting ground. Is adapting possible?

A team of USA TODAY Network reporters has been investigating how people up and down the East Coast are grappling with the climate crisis — from the natural disasters that grab headlines to the quieter forces gnawing at our personal stability, homes and livelihoods.

Journalists from more than 35 newsrooms from New Hampshire to Florida spoke with regular people this summer about real-life impacts, digging into the science and investigating government response, or lack of it.

Climate change:The climate future is now. Humans navigate a ‘Perilous Course’ on the East Coast.

🔒 Hurricane Ida’s deluge nearly drowned him in his NY apartment. He can’t afford to leave.

Randy Scott sits outside his apartment in Mamaroneck May 3, 2022. Scott escaped through his kitchen window of his basement apartment when the remnants of Hurricane Ida flooded the Flats neighborhood after three neighbors banged on his window to get him to leave his apartment.
Randy Scott sits outside his apartment in Mamaroneck May 3, 2022. Scott escaped through his kitchen window of his basement apartment when the remnants of Hurricane Ida flooded the Flats neighborhood after three neighbors banged on his window to get him to leave his apartment.

Hurricane Ida's flooding nearly drowned Randy Scott in his basement apartment in the midst of a climate-charged hurricane season in New York.

Research suggests the climate crisis, with warming temperatures and more moisture in the atmosphere, is making tropical cyclones more intense.

Climate crisis:Hurricane Ida’s deluge nearly drowned him in his NY apartment. He can’t afford to leave.

🔒 Muskrats, eagles, marsh: This tribal chief sees climate crisis threaten East Coast culture

Chief Donna Abbott traps in the marsh in lower Dorchester County, Maryland, for muskrats on a cold morning Feb. 11, 2020. Some members of Nause-Waiwash, her tribe on the Eastern Shore, have done this for generations, on land ancestors inhabited far longer.
Chief Donna Abbott traps in the marsh in lower Dorchester County, Maryland, for muskrats on a cold morning Feb. 11, 2020. Some members of Nause-Waiwash, her tribe on the Eastern Shore, have done this for generations, on land ancestors inhabited far longer.

DORCHESTER COUNTY, MARYLAND — The dream catcher’s feathers swayed forward as Donna Abbott’s truck rolled to a stop. She cut the engine, welcoming the silence ofa soggy morning.

Fog pressed its weight on outstretched marsh, folding over miles of grasses matted in tangles of raw sienna and gold, veined with intertwining paths of water.

Her cousin Brenda "Morning Marsh Woman" Abbott hopped out of the back, dropping the tailgate to grab her trappingtools. Smiling from beneath her dark camo hat, she was quickly soaked by rain.

Tide’s up.

The pair belongs to the Nause-Waiwash Indians, a small band of the greater Nanticoke Nation, coping with a rapidly changing environment on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. Today, the tribe's ancestral lands, nestled against the Chesapeake Bay, are sinking.

But this morning was about tradition. It was about muskrat trapping.

Changing environment:Muskrats, eagles, marsh: This tribal chief sees climate crisis threaten East Coast culture

🔒Week 2 predictions for Delaware high school football

Seaford's Akendre Matthews (6) snags a pass intended for Tower Hill's Joshua Hall in the third quarter of Seaford's 34-21 win at Tower Hill School, Friday, Sept. 9, 2022.
Seaford's Akendre Matthews (6) snags a pass intended for Tower Hill's Joshua Hall in the third quarter of Seaford's 34-21 win at Tower Hill School, Friday, Sept. 9, 2022.

Who will come out on top in this week's Delaware high school football games? Our experts Brad Myers, Kevin Tresolini and Matt Kalin offer up their predictions here.

Tight matchups: Week 2 predictions for Delaware high school football

How these planned beach hotels could change the look of the Rehoboth boardwalk

Nice, albeit chilly, weather brought out the beach fans and traffic in Rehoboth on Saturday. Visitors walked the boardwalk and beach and enjoyed ice cream and french fries.
Nice, albeit chilly, weather brought out the beach fans and traffic in Rehoboth on Saturday. Visitors walked the boardwalk and beach and enjoyed ice cream and french fries.

In future summers, the edges of the Rehoboth Beach boardwalk could have a new, larger look.

Multiple plans are in the works to build hotels in Rehoboth Beach, one of Delaware's most popular destinations that keeps getting busier. In the coming years, when beachgoers look back on the avenue from the sand, there will likely be more oceanfront balconies and windows than one-story shops.

Two projects could shakeup the end of the boardwalk. The longtime owner of the Candy Kitchen corner wants to build a 100-plus room building there in the image of a mid-20th century hotel. Across the avenue, Grotto Pizza is taking over the former Dolle's with plans for a restaurant and hotel.

Read more: How these planned beach hotels could change the look of the Rehoboth boardwalk

Legislative races too close to call, low turnout, major upsets

Colin Bonini, R-Dover South speaks against a bill aimed at moving Delaware judges away from using cash bail.
Colin Bonini, R-Dover South speaks against a bill aimed at moving Delaware judges away from using cash bail.

Tuesday’s Delaware primary included more than a dozen races of General Assembly lawmakers, a majority of which included challenges against long-time incumbents. Every lawmaker is up for reelection this year, though not everyone had a primary challenger.

Some races were still to close to call Wednesday morning, but one that was not was a three-way contest that saw seven-term incumbent Sen. Colin Bonini finish third behind Kent County Levy Court Commissioner Eric Buckson and Air Force veteran Kim Petters on the Republican side.

Buckson, the son of former Gov. David P. Buckson, won with 1,915 votes, 51.11%. Petters was second with 1,071 votes, 27.14%, while Bonini received 815 votes, 21.75%.

Delaware Primary: Legislative races too close to call, low turnout, major upsets

🔒Top 43 players in Delaware high school field hockey

Delmar midfielder Josie Hollamon (12) attempts a shot during the Division II title game between Delmar and Newark Charter Saturday.
Delmar midfielder Josie Hollamon (12) attempts a shot during the Division II title game between Delmar and Newark Charter Saturday.

When we asked Delaware's top high school field hockey coaches to rank the top players going into the 2022 season, there were no surprises at the top.

Most of the top 10 on our preseason list have made various U.S. national teams and/or played big roles on elite club teams. They either already have college scholarships lined up or are being heavily recruited.

But there also plenty of room for other players around the state, freshmen and other up and comers sure to make their mark as the season goes along.

It is an impressive list, the Top 43 players in Delaware high school field hockey as the season kicks into high gear.

Lydia York defeats embattled Kathy McGuiness in Democratic auditor primary

Democratic candidate for state auditor Lydia York speaks with supporters at a post-primary election gathering at Timothy's on the Riverfront in Wilmington, Tuesday. Sept. 13, 2022.
Democratic candidate for state auditor Lydia York speaks with supporters at a post-primary election gathering at Timothy's on the Riverfront in Wilmington, Tuesday. Sept. 13, 2022.

Lydia York, a lawyer and accountant, won the Democratic primary for state auditor on Tuesday, defeating Kathy McGuiness, the embattled incumbent who had lost the support of many in her party in the wake of her misconduct convictions.

York will face Republican Janice Lorrah, a Hockessin lawyer, in November. If elected, York will become the first Black woman to serve in the role.

Read more: Lydia York defeats embattled McGuiness in Democratic auditor primary

🔒Firefly icon Sobear is a rave-happy teddy bear and a symbol of hope

Joe Meier, 33, from Delaware County, shows off his Sobear totem outside his home in Philadelphia, Thursday, Sept. 8, 2022.
Joe Meier, 33, from Delaware County, shows off his Sobear totem outside his home in Philadelphia, Thursday, Sept. 8, 2022.

A teddy bear that likes to rave has become a mini celebrity at Firefly Music Festival since his debut in 2017.

This care bear is illuminated with lights at night and equipped with the special healing power to cheer up festivalgoers who may be struggling with sobriety.

This Firefly icon is named Sobear (sometimes Sober Bear) and the EDM-loving teddy will return with his dad, Joe Meier, to the festival next week, which launches in The Woodlands of Dover on Thursday, Sept. 22 and runs til Sunday, Sept. 25.

Read more: Firefly icon Sobear is a rave-happy teddy bear and a symbol of hope

Parking at the Delaware beaches this fall? Know when parking is free

Lewes has parking meters in downtown areas, as well as its two municipal beaches.
Lewes has parking meters in downtown areas, as well as its two municipal beaches.

Locals and frequent Delaware beach visitors almost always rave about the fall season: cooler weather, a reprieve in solid Coastal Highway traffic and a little more availability at favorite restaurants.

But one of the best feelings? Being able to pull into a downtown Lewes or Rehoboth Avenue parking spot and not have to worry about paying to park.

Finally, the end of parking season is upon us. While many beach towns cover up their meters and stop charging for parking on Sept. 15, there are some variations.

Read more: Beach parking will start to be free this week. What to know about each town's rules

🔒How many officers work at the police department in your neighborhood?

Mounting public criticism and exposed wrongdoings have left police departments nationwide struggling to staff their forces — and Delaware is no exception.

Police chiefs across the state have reported lower staffing numbers and are pushing new people to apply for their departments.

Using the latest census data and reports from almost all of the state’s police departments, Delaware Online/The News Journal was able to calculate the ratio of officers to civilians they serve.

Read more: How many officers patrol your community? Take a look at staffing at local departments

🔒Why this Delaware hospital is investing millions in medical education

Dr. Dean Johnson, Emergency Medicine Program Director at Bayhealth Medical Center, shows how doctors can practice treating an accident victim at the facilities new simulation center.
Dr. Dean Johnson, Emergency Medicine Program Director at Bayhealth Medical Center, shows how doctors can practice treating an accident victim at the facilities new simulation center.

Hal lay stretched out on a bed in the emergency department as doctors hovered around him and assessed his breathing and heart rate on a bedside computer screen.

But even though the screen showed vibrant lines that zigged and zagged as they should for someone who is alive, Hal doesn’t have a real heart or lung − or any organs or bones.

Named “Trauma Hal,” this is one of the nearly lifelike mannequins that make up the new simulation center that opened this September at Bayhealth Hospital in Dover.

With this advanced technology, Bayhealth residents, students and faculty can develop and hone specific skills – including delivering oxygen or chest compressions, inserting a central line into a vein and performing gallbladder surgery – all before needing to use these skills on a human being.

Read more: Could a high-tech simulation lab attract more doctors to Delaware? This hospital thinks so

DSU lineman uses NIL rules to collect shoes for the needy

Blue Hen ball-carriers and passers will want to make sure their shoes are tied tightly Saturday night when Delaware State visits.

If DSU defensive lineman Isaiah Williams gets his hands on them, they may never see them again.

But at least they’d be going to a good place, considering Williams’ involvement with the nonprofit Samaritan’s Feet, which aims to bring footwear to the shoeless.

Actually, Williams will be much more interested in sacks and tackles for lost yardage than swiping anyone’s shoes when the Blue Hens and Hornets collide at 6 p.m. at Delaware Stadium in Newark.

Samaritan’s Feet:DSU lineman uses NIL rules to collect shoes for the needy

Eagles fans may not always see it, but a fighter lurks inside team's head coach

Philadelphia Eagles' head coach Nick Sirianni heads off the field after losing to the New England Patriots in a preseason NFL football game Thursday, Aug. 19, 2021, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Chris Szagola)
Philadelphia Eagles' head coach Nick Sirianni heads off the field after losing to the New England Patriots in a preseason NFL football game Thursday, Aug. 19, 2021, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Chris Szagola)

It was evident that something wasn't sitting right with Jason Kelce.

The Eagles center had heard all the heightened expectations for this Eagles' season, with some pundits suggesting they could go to the Super Bowl.

All of this seemed to clash with Eagles coach Nick Sirianni describing his comfort level heading into his second season, or quarterback Jalen Hurts' comfort level about being in the same system with the same offense for the second straight year. That was something he hadn't experienced since playing in high school for his father.

The word "comfort" gnawed at Kelce.

Team leader:Eagles fans may not always see it, but a fighter lurks inside team's head coach

Summer's over but the beach is still open. Your fall guide for visits

Cape Henlopen State Park is quiet after a busy day. Sunny weather brought crowds to the Delaware beaches, Saturday, August 21, 2022.
Cape Henlopen State Park is quiet after a busy day. Sunny weather brought crowds to the Delaware beaches, Saturday, August 21, 2022.

While beach visits don't come to a complete halt after Labor Day, the Delaware beaches always seem to let out a big sigh of relief during this first full week of September.

It's the time of year that year-round residents often crave: The traffic lets up a bit, the beaches are a little less crowded during morning strolls or sunset viewings and favorite restaurants bring in more of a local crowd.

Still, with many people moving to the beaches and southern Delaware, the September slow-down may seem to be fading away. The good news? Many activities and fun experiences are still ahead for those visitors who want to make the most of their post-Labor Day visits.

Read more: The Delaware beaches don't quit after Labor Day. What to know about fall events, parking

6 places to walk, learn history, see great views and maybe a ghost

School is already back in session and summer is slowly fading into fall.

If you're not in the classroom but still want to learn where some history happened and enjoy outdoor autumn weather and the soon-to-change leaves, we have suggestions for trails where you can walk in the footsteps of those who came before us.

Lace up some sturdy shoes, get ready to become a local tourist, and check out these six, maybe new-to-you places in and near Delaware that have relatively easy walking trails.

Walk this way: 6 places to hike, soak up history, see autumn leaves and maybe a few ghosts

22 predictions for Eagles 2022 season, most of which fans will love

Philadelphia Eagles' Jalen Hurts reacts to cheering fans during training camp at the NFL football team's practice facility, Friday, July 29, 2022, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)
Philadelphia Eagles' Jalen Hurts reacts to cheering fans during training camp at the NFL football team's practice facility, Friday, July 29, 2022, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

We all know about the high expectations for the Eagles heading into the 2022 season after an offseason in which general manager Howie Roseman upgraded the defense and added a star wide receiver to the offense.

We just don't know how that will play out through 17 games, beginning with the first on Sunday against the Lions in Detroit. So many things can sabotage even the best-laid plans, just like so many things can go right to result in a magical Super Bowl season.

Here, then, are 22 bold Eagles' predictions for 2022.

Eagles forecast:22 bold Eagles predictions for 2022, including a WR record, Carson Wentz's unhappy return

🔒Delaware football eyes more dominance of DSU after win at Navy

Delaware head coach Ryan Carty exults after a water dunking following his first head coaching win in his debut in the Blue Hens' 14-7 win against Navy at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis, Md., Saturday, Sept. 3, 2022.
Delaware head coach Ryan Carty exults after a water dunking following his first head coaching win in his debut in the Blue Hens' 14-7 win against Navy at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium in Annapolis, Md., Saturday, Sept. 3, 2022.

Delaware’s upset win at Navy Saturday was big.

A Delaware State victory at Delaware this Saturday would be gigantic, despite the fact that, unlike FCS Delaware and FBS Navy, the Hornets do play on the same NCAA level as the Blue Hens.

But they have not been competitive in 10 previous tries, with Delaware prevailing in every game by double digits.

With the Blue Hens climbing to No. 10 in the national FCS rankings this week, DSU’s task appears even more immense for Saturday’s showdown between the two at Delaware Stadium.

Read more:After attention-getting win at Navy, Delaware preps for upset-minded Hornets

Delaware ranks 48th for quality of life, report says. Really?

Aerial view of the Delaware Memorial Bridge. A governmental agency created by compact in 1962, the Delaware River and Bay Authority owns and operates the Delaware Memorial Bridge, the Cape May-Lewes Ferry and the Forts Ferry Crossing.
Aerial view of the Delaware Memorial Bridge. A governmental agency created by compact in 1962, the Delaware River and Bay Authority owns and operates the Delaware Memorial Bridge, the Cape May-Lewes Ferry and the Forts Ferry Crossing.

Delaware is the 24th best state to live in, according to a recent survey, but when it comes to the state's quality of life, the results were a bit different: The First State came in 48th in the nation.

The only states to fare worse than Delaware were Mississippi at No. 49 and Alaska at No. 50, both of which also ranked at the bottom of the list for the best states to live in.

Coming in at No. 1 for the quality-of-life category is New York, followed by California at No. 2 and Pennsylvania at No. 3. Our other regional neighbors also fared much better in the category, with Virginia ranking at No. 5 for quality of life and Maryland at 31.

Is Delaware’s quality of life really that bad? Let’s take a deep dive into the survey’s findings.

Read more: Delaware ranks 48th for quality of life, according to this survey. Are we buying it?

🔒Delaware OB-GYN group faces fallout after employee steals from doctors

Keeping an obstetrics and gynecology practice open, or at least fully staffed, was already difficult.

At a time when access to reproductive health care has been limited across the country, practices in Delaware and across the region have been facing layers of ongoing challenges: High costs for liability insurance. Low reimbursements from Medicaid. Increased patient loads and dwindling staff.

While these factors simmered in the background, it wasn’t systemic problems or staffing shortages, though, that ultimately sparked disruption at All About Women, a small partnership of physicians in the Newark area.

Instead, the U.S. Attorney’s Office announced Wednesday that the practice faced financial, professional and emotional tensions after its former office director took advantage of All About Women by stealing money from the practice for six years.

Read more: How a Delaware employee's 'assault on women's healthcare' altered this OB-GYN practice

Why this Delaware church has spent 10 years feeding local families

From left, Phil Diego, wife Marguerite Diego and Eric, who are volunteers at the Greenbank Church of Christ drive-thru food pantry in Prices Corner, carry boxes of food to meal recipients on Thursday, Aug. 25, 2022. The pantry serves free meals to the community and continues to follow COVID-19 protocols.
From left, Phil Diego, wife Marguerite Diego and Eric, who are volunteers at the Greenbank Church of Christ drive-thru food pantry in Prices Corner, carry boxes of food to meal recipients on Thursday, Aug. 25, 2022. The pantry serves free meals to the community and continues to follow COVID-19 protocols.

The Greenbank Church of Christ’s drive-thru food pantry was bustling with activity on a recent Thursday evening, as the church carried on its 10-year tradition of providing free weekly meals to local families.

Community residents drove past the entrance of the pantry and exited the Prices Corner property with enough food to last their families through the end of the month.

“The pantry is a blessing,” said Senior Minister Domingo Reyes of the Greenbank Church. “People call us the best food pantry but we’re not in competition with anybody. We just do it from the heart.”

The weekly pantry, located off 511 Greenbank Road, is held every Thursday, from 6 to 6:45 p.m. It has been in operation for almost a decade and has grown significantly over the years.

Read more: After 10 years, COVID and a merger, this Prices Corner church is still feeding the hungry

🔒Did PGA event impact release of info about Wilmington shootings?

As tens of thousands visited the Wilmington area for Delaware’s first-ever PGA tour event, only sparse details about two fatal shootings that week, just blocks from downtown, were released by city officials.

But plenty of local politicians, Wilmington residents and WSFS Bank employees were well aware that one of the victims was 37-year-old WSFS Bank vice president Carrie Mondell, who was struck by a stray bullet Tuesday, Aug. 16 just minutes after leaving work.

It would take three Delaware Online reporters contacting Wilmington police, Mayor Mike Purzycki, local political leaders, bank executives and business owners to prompt city police to release an update that Friday. That update said that a 37-year-old woman had died, not identifying Mondell.

Read more:Did Wilmington hold back details of homicides during PGA event?

What to Know: Delaware at Navy football

All the important names, facts and figures for Saturday's Delaware football opener at Navy, its first game under coach Ryan Carty.

VIDEO: What to Know: Delaware at Navy football

Check that call: Police warn of scam callers pretending to be officers

Local police are warning of a rise in phone scams in which callers are pretending to be officers to extort money or information.

The scammers, police said, are using caller ID spoofing to disguise themselves as members of police departments.

According to the New Castle County Police Department, a woman recently got a call from someone pretending to be county police Lt. Brian Faulkner. The scammer told the woman to pay $6,000 for outstanding warrants, according to police, and said she would be arrested if she didn't comply. A spoofed caller ID made it look like the call came from the police department.

Check that phone number: Scammers are now pretending to be Delaware police

Class 2A-3 football: Caravel has ingredients for big year

Craig Miller carries the ball during the fourth quarter. Caravel beat Milford, 44-0, Friday at Bob Peoples Stadium.
Craig Miller carries the ball during the fourth quarter. Caravel beat Milford, 44-0, Friday at Bob Peoples Stadium.

John Reed knows the expectations are high for his Caravel football team.

“It looks good on paper,” the veteran coach said. “Hopefully, we can put it together and have a great season.”

The Buccaneers return the majority of starters from a team that surged from 3-4 in the pandemic-shortened 2020 season to 9-2 last year. Caravel only lost to Class 2A, District 3 champion Woodbridge during the regular season before falling to Delaware Military Academy in the 2A quarterfinals.

The Bucs have been strengthening their bodies and their bonds ever since.

Class 2A-3 football preview:Caravel has ingredients for big year

Winter is coming to Delaware with this Game of Thrones baby name

Baby names inspired by the popular HBO series Game of Thrones have begun trending nationwide, and a little bit of Westeros has even made its way to Delaware.

The series, based on novels written by George R. R. Martin, was an immediate success when it premiered in 2011.

Its loyal following has gone a step further to pledge their devotion to the show by adopting some popular character names for their own children, with over 20,000 babies named in honor of Westeros‘ own since the show’s debut 11 years ago.

Read more: You won't believe which Game of Thrones character these Delaware babies were named after.

Delaware Online has you covered when it comes to high school football this fall

Salesianum defensive end Nathaniel Ray (89) in action during a DIAA Class 3A semifinal game.
Salesianum defensive end Nathaniel Ray (89) in action during a DIAA Class 3A semifinal game.

Buckle your chin strap.

Delaware’s high school football season begins Thursday, starting the second year of a sweeping realignment that has placed all 46 teams into new classes and districts designed for more equal competition and closer games.

Delaware Online/The News Journal is here to help fans keep track of everything, with stories, photos and videos on multiple platforms each week all the way through the championship games on Dec. 9-10.

Read more:Delaware Online has you covered when it comes to high school football this fall

🔒Class 2A-2 football: Coaching transition complete at Friends

After 53 seasons, Wilmington Friends finally has a new football coach.

But don’t expect wholesale changes. Don’t even expect minor changes.

Don’t even expect the last name of the coach to change.

“My No. 1 job is not to screw it up, so I’m keeping everything the same,” Rob Tattersall said.

Class 2A-2 football preview:Coaching transition complete at Friends

🔒Class 2A-1 football: Playoff berth makes Newark hungry for more

Newark's Damian Wright throws downfield in the first half of the Seahawk's 46-0 win at Delaware Military Academy Friday, Oct. 29, 2021.
Newark's Damian Wright throws downfield in the first half of the Seahawk's 46-0 win at Delaware Military Academy Friday, Oct. 29, 2021.

The Newark High football team took a baby step last season.

Coach Jody Russell hopes it motivates his Yellowjackets to strive for a bigger leap this year.

Newark went 5-5 during the regular season, and did well enough within the new Class 2A, District 1 to earn a playoff berth.

“It was huge for our program,” Russell said. “After a 10-year absence, to get back to the playoffs was enormous.”

Class 2A-1 football preview: Playoff berth makes Newark hungry for more

What kind of winter will we have in Delaware? The almanacs weigh in.

Aaron Lewis from A-1 Kevin’s Landscaping shovels snow at St. Polycarp Church on South Street in Smyrna Jan. 29, 2022.
Aaron Lewis from A-1 Kevin’s Landscaping shovels snow at St. Polycarp Church on South Street in Smyrna Jan. 29, 2022.

In a showdown of science mixed with folklore, are the almanacs on the same page with their winter forecasts for Delaware?

A few weeks ago, we previewed Farmers’ Almanac, but now the granddaddy of all prognosticators, The Old Farmer’s Almanac, has weighed in with its winter predictions.

Read more:Are we destined for a mild or harsh winter in Delaware?

Why fentanyl testing strips will be included in Delaware's Narcan kits

Dr. Sandra Gibney demonstrates how a fentanyl testing strip test works at St. Francis Hospital in Wilmington. She conducted a study to determine how often fentanyl was present in emergency room patients.
Dr. Sandra Gibney demonstrates how a fentanyl testing strip test works at St. Francis Hospital in Wilmington. She conducted a study to determine how often fentanyl was present in emergency room patients.

Fentanyl test strips will now be a regular part of kits distributed by the state's Office of Health Crisis Response containing the overdose-reversing medication Narcan, according to the state Division of Public Health.

State health officials said these test strips – which Delaware considered paraphernalia until Gov. John Carney signed a bill in 2021 that allowed their distribution – are a preventative measure for those using drugs.

The strips make it possible to test anything from marijuana to cocaine, meth or ecstasy for the presence of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid that is highly addictive and has been a leading driver of fatal overdoses in recent years. Users can then choose not to use that drug or protect themselves with other measures. The test strips are highly sensitive and will detect fentanyl down to 0.1 mcg/ml.

Read more:Delaware's plan to prevent more overdoses involves fentanyl testing strips. Here's how it works.

🔒Class 3A-2 football: Dover making strides under veteran coach

Dover running back Jakwon Kilby (21) break free en route to the end zone to score his first touchdown of the night during a game between Dover and William Penn
Dover running back Jakwon Kilby (21) break free en route to the end zone to score his first touchdown of the night during a game between Dover and William Penn

After 33 years at Wesley College, Chip Knapp was launching into the unknown of coaching high school football. And coming off of a losing season, the Dover Senators didn’t know how things would change under their new leader.

Everyone overcame the uncertainty to put together a 7-5 season that ended with a 46-21 loss to Smyrna in the DIAA Class 3A semifinals, with Dover trailing just 24-21 going into the fourth quarter.

Now, with the growing pains behind them, Knapp and his Senators could go even farther.

Read more:Class 3A-2 high school football preview: Dover making strides under veteran coach

🔒Delaware's job growth places it toward bottom of the country

A Dunkin' location on Pennsylvania Avenue in Wilmington, like many in the area, has posted wanted notices, Tuesday, August 31, 2021.
A Dunkin' location on Pennsylvania Avenue in Wilmington, like many in the area, has posted wanted notices, Tuesday, August 31, 2021.

Delaware continues to add jobs in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, but the state's progress is lagging behind most other states.

After four consecutive stagnant months, Delaware's unemployment rate fell to 4.4% in July. The First State plunged to tied for 45th among all states in the unemployment rate, falling behind neighbors Pennsylvania, Maryland and New Jersey. The national rate is 3.5%.

Read more: More people are working, but Delaware is lagging behind most other states in job growth

🔒Class 3A-1 football: Hodgson out to win in coach's farewell season

Las Vegas Raiders defensive tackle Bilal Nichols and his former high school coach Frank Moffett, Jr. have a laugh during Nichols' BamFam Foundation football camp Saturday at Hodgson Vo-Tech's football stadium south of Newark.
Las Vegas Raiders defensive tackle Bilal Nichols and his former high school coach Frank Moffett, Jr. have a laugh during Nichols' BamFam Foundation football camp Saturday at Hodgson Vo-Tech's football stadium south of Newark.

Throughout 29 years of football at Hodgson Vo-Tech – the last 20 as head coach – Frank Moffett has stressed some simple keys to success.

“Faith, football, family, tradition, legacy,” he said. “That’s the mantras I’ve built this program on, and it’s the way I want to leave it.”

His approach has helped the Silver Eagles soar to four state championships – Division II crowns in 2007, 2013 and 2014 and a Division I title in 2019, when a 54-31 pasting of Middletown set a record for most points scored by a winning team in a DIAA football final.

Now, going into his final season, Moffett faces a different challenge. Getting Hodgson back to contention after stumbling to 2-9 last season.

Class 3A-1 high school football preview:Coach's final season motivates Hodgson

Check out these 9 dog-friendly Delaware restaurants, bars & breweries

There’s a reason dogs are man’s best friend.

Most people who own dogs couldn’t imagine living without them and treat them like their own children. That’s why it can seem so unfair when we have to leave our dogs at home, especially after being home so much in the last two years.

In recent years, many restaurants have become more dog-friendly. Gov. John Carney signed a bill into law allowing dogs in outdoor seating areas in 2020.

If a dog is well-behaved and doesn’t disturb other guests, they are welcome to curl up under the table and spend some more time with their owners.

Down below you can find a list of several dog-friendly restaurants and hangouts in Delaware, so you and your pooch can enjoy every waking second together.

Read more: Dog-friendly places to take your best friend in Delaware

🔒Delaware high school football preseason rankings: Top 75 players

Mt. Pleasant's Dahmir Byrd (7) runs the ball at Lake Forest High School.
Mt. Pleasant's Dahmir Byrd (7) runs the ball at Lake Forest High School.

Just like a football team days away from its first game, it’s time to put it all together.

We have been going through the top players in Delaware high school football by position the last couple of weeks, rating players solely for their play at each spot.

Now, let’s take a look at the big picture. It’s time to reveal Delaware Online’s overall preseason Top 75 football player rankings.

Preseason rankings: Overall Top 75 players in Delaware high school football

🔒Prison policy change makes sick prisoners needlessly suffer, says lawsuit

A tour of the culinary and horticulture programs at James T. Vaughn Correctional Center.
A tour of the culinary and horticulture programs at James T. Vaughn Correctional Center.

A group of Delaware prisoners has sued the state's prison system and its private health care contractor claiming they’ve been left to suffer chronic and sometimes debilitating pain after officials banned certain pain medicines.

Aside from complaints involving the pandemic, the lawsuit is the first large-scale litigation filed against Centurion of Delaware, the private health care provider for the state’s prison system.

Centurion won a $47 million contract to provide health care for those imprisoned by the state starting in 2020, taking over after years of complaints and scandal involving the prisons' prior health care provider.

The lawsuit names 24 plaintiffs. All but one are currently in a Delaware prison.

They each claim that they suffer from chronic pain or nerve damage caused by a range of issues from gunshot wounds to things like degenerative joint and spinal conditions, pain that was treated by medications that were effectively banned by the prison in 2019, the lawsuit states.

Read more: Prison policy change makes sick prisoners needlessly suffer, says lawsuit

🔒Delaware is a co-star in Aubrey Plaza's new animated show 'Little Demon'

Twenty-five years after first meeting at Wilmington Drama League as teens, Aubrey Plaza and Seth Kirschner are reuniting this week.

It won't be on the community theater stage on Lea Boulevard where they got their start, however. It will be as star (Plaza) and co-creator (Kirschner) of the new animated comedy "Little Demon," which debuts Thursday on FXX with back-to-back episodes at 10 p.m.

Even better, the show is set in Delaware, dotted with Diamond State references. If there was a "Little Demon"/Delaware drinking game, you'd probably catch a buzz.

The fanciful plot follows Plaza as Laura, mother to her Antichrist daughter Chrissy, played by Lucy DeVito. The pair move to Delaware in an attempt to live a normal life, but Laura's ex (Satan, played by Danny DeVito) finds them in the First State.

Read more: Wilmington's Aubrey Plaza explains why her new show, 'Little Demon,' is set in Delaware

🔒Why the University of Delaware still takes money from the family behind OxyContin

Purdue Pharma headquarters stands in downtown Stamford, April 2, 2019 in Stamford, Connecticut. Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, and its owners, the Sackler family, are facing hundreds of lawsuits across the country for the company's alleged role in the opioid epidemic that has killed more than 200,000 Americans over the past 20 years.
Purdue Pharma headquarters stands in downtown Stamford, April 2, 2019 in Stamford, Connecticut. Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, and its owners, the Sackler family, are facing hundreds of lawsuits across the country for the company's alleged role in the opioid epidemic that has killed more than 200,000 Americans over the past 20 years.

The Sackler name has become synonymous with the opioid crisis in recent years.

Lawsuits across the U.S. have targeted the family's company, Purdue Pharma, for falsely advertising its drug OxyContin as nonaddictive and encouraging doctors to overprescribe it. Earlier this year, the company reached a $6 billion tentative settlement agreement with states across America, including Delaware, to mitigate the effects of the opioid epidemic.

As the Sackler family's role in the ever-growing addiction epidemic became more widely known, many organizations once supported by the Sacklers' extensive philanthropy swore off attachments. Cultural hubs from the Metropolitan Museum of Art to the National Gallery in London took down the family's name from their walls after mounting public pressure, as did universities across the globe.

However, not all schools cut ties with the Sacklers. The University of Delaware is one of them.

Read more:Why the University of Delaware still takes money from the family behind OxyContin

🔒Delaware high school football preseason rankings: Running backs

Cape Henlopen freshman Maurki James takes a handoff for a gain between Dover's Jamir Richardson (2) and Tyir Trott (4) on Thursday. Dover won 34-21.
Cape Henlopen freshman Maurki James takes a handoff for a gain between Dover's Jamir Richardson (2) and Tyir Trott (4) on Thursday. Dover won 34-21.

Passing may be catching up (pun intended), but running back remains the most glamorous position in high school football.

The tailbacks, halfbacks and fullbacks still carry the offensive load on most teams, still get the most opportunities to wow the crowd and rack up the big statistics.

Looking at the preseason list of Delaware’s best, it’s easy to see why.

This group has a little bit of everything – speed, size, cutting ability, balance and raw power. They can run around, between, through or over a defense.

Watch them go: Preseason top running backs in Delaware high school football

🔒Wilmington towing contractor charges fees that aren't in its contract

When City Towing Services contracted with Wilmington to provide towing and impoundment services, the company agreed to charge nothing for storing vehicles it towed.

The New Castle-based business also said it would only charge a penny for each car towed, its contract bid stated.

But City Towing charged fees for storing cars towed in Wilmington anyway, taking owners and lienholders to court for thousands of dollars when those fees went unpaid, a Delaware Online/The News Journal review of Delaware Justice of the Peace Court filings show.

Since late-2019 when City Towing first won the Wilmington contract, the company has filed over 200 garage keeper’s liens against vehicle owners, along with their lienholders, who have unpaid fees associated with the car’s impoundment. Some of the liens were filed as recent as this month, court records show, beginning the process for the tow company to sell the vehicle and recoup costs.

Read more:Tow company bid $0 storage fee, but charged Wilmington drivers thousands anyway

🔒Wilmington's 'John Wayne' kicks down hurdles for men behind bars

Grammy Award-winner John Flynn has never committed a crime, but he keeps going back to prison in Wilmington. He does so with a purpose: To help men serving time make the transition from incarceration to freedom.

The singer-songwriter, who is well known in the Philadelphia-area folk music scene, said he likes to wear cowboy boots because they make his toes happy.

So far, he's only met one prisoner who questioned his footwear.

Although the Temple University grad is a career musician and has played concerts in prison, he's not there to teach the incarcerated individuals in his program how to sing, write or play music.

Flynn is executive director of the prison reentry program New Beginnings-Next Step, a nonprofit with a mission to help men serving time, as well as returning citizens, transition from incarceration to freedom.

Read more:Grammy singer wears cowboy boots to prison. His calling is to keep men out of the system.

🔒 Delaware high school football preseason rankings: Wide receivers and tight ends

Howard's Jamal Johnson grabs a touchdown pass against the defense of Concord's Israel Daniels in Howard's 58-7 win at Abessinio Stadium, Thursday, Sept. 9, 2021.
Howard's Jamal Johnson grabs a touchdown pass against the defense of Concord's Israel Daniels in Howard's 58-7 win at Abessinio Stadium, Thursday, Sept. 9, 2021.

It might be a difficult season for defensive backs in Delaware high school football.

Offensive coordinators are calling more pass plays than ever, and there are a fleet of wide receivers who can catch them and do damage at every level.

On top of that, at least a couple of tight ends could be a big part of their teams’ offenses, going up the seam or splitting out wide to create mismatches with their height and strength.

There will be no shortage of dynamic playmakers across the First State, and this preseason list of the Top 14 receivers and tight ends is impressive.

Great catch: Preseason top receivers, tight ends in Delaware high school football

🔒10 ways you can distinguish yourself from the beach tourists

A man looks at a parking sign at Savannah Beach in Lewes on Monday, May 23, 2022.
A man looks at a parking sign at Savannah Beach in Lewes on Monday, May 23, 2022.

Are you sick of the sideways looks when you tell people you’re not a Delaware native? Do you find yourself constantly teased by your friends for being a newcomer to the First State? Are you paranoid that you stick out as a tourist while visiting the beaches?

Then, look no further. Help is here.

Members of the Delaware Online/News Journal newsroom wracked their brains to bring you some tips on how to blend in as a true Delawarean. (Cue dramatic music).

With so many people moving to Delaware, or learning about it from some particularly famous residents, we thought it was time to round up some hacks that will help you become part of the unique fabric of the First State.

How to become a true Delawarean: 10 ways you can distinguish yourself from the beach tourists

Patrick Cantlay defends title at BMW Championship at Wilmington Country Club

Aug. 21: Patrick Cantlay posses with the trophies after winning the BMW Championship.
Aug. 21: Patrick Cantlay posses with the trophies after winning the BMW Championship.

Patrick Cantlay drove off with the BMW Championship trophy again.

The 30-year-old Californian made birdie at the 17th hole at the south course at Wilmington Country Club and held on for a one-stroke victory over Scott Stallings. Cantlay shot 2-under 69 for a 72-hole total of 14-under 268 and became the first player to successfully defend a FedEx Cup Playoffs event.

A year ago, Patrick Cantlay needed six extra holes at Caves Valley to claim the BMW title en route to winning the FedEx Cup. New course, but same result as Cantlay claimed his eighth PGA Tour title and second of the season.

Read more: Patrick Cantlay defends title at BMW Championship, makes FedEx Cup Playoffs history

Basketball ban draws outcry in Delmar

The town of Delmar fanned the flames of social media earlier this week by reminding residents it is against town laws to place basketball hoops on roads, sidewalks and the edges of driveways or lawns.

“To ensure the safety of adults, teens and small children that reside in our town, we have enacted legislation that prohibits playing on all public streets and/or sidewalks,” the post said.

An ordinance was indeed enacted — in 1985, the town later updated the post to indicate.

“What happened is we put a reminder out to folks,” said Town Manager Jeff Fleetwood. “Just an annual reaffirmation of policy.”

No basketball? Delmar to enforce long-forgotten hoops ban on streets, sparking outrage

🔒 Why these women are pushing back on restrictions

Erin Chronister stood on a platform elevating speakers at the gun rights rally covering The Green on that blistering hot June day.

She held two young children and called on the women in attendance at the Dover rally to pull in tighter around her as she spoke. Chronister said she wanted to speak to them directly so she could explain why the state's new gun legislation would only hinder those who she felt needed firearms the most.

Chronister, a guns rights advocate, told those gathered she believes that all the recently passed gun reforms do is reflect a legislature's emotional reaction to criminal wrongdoing rather than actually support potential victims — specifically women and the disabled. Instead of wanting to ban and limit gun ownership at a time when there are increased calls nationwide for these reforms, she is part of a group of women who are actively promoting it.

'No one's coming to save you': Why these Delaware women are arming themselves with guns

17 courses at Delaware universities that might surprise you

If you think that English students are just learning the classics, and theater students are just performing Shakespeare? Think twice.

College courses have come a long way. From belly dancing to scuba diving, there are more unusual options that University of Delaware and Delaware State University students have nowadays when it comes to filling their class schedules.

Read more: 17 courses at Delaware universities that might surprise you

🔒Delaware high school football preseason rankings: Defensive linemen

Caravel's Owen Robinson sacks St. Elizabeth quarterback Brett Smick in the first half of the Bucs' 35-0 win at Abessinio Stadium, Thursday, Nov. 11, 2021.
Caravel's Owen Robinson sacks St. Elizabeth quarterback Brett Smick in the first half of the Bucs' 35-0 win at Abessinio Stadium, Thursday, Nov. 11, 2021.

The best defensive linemen can ruin your play, and ruin your day.

The big, strong, mobile, nasty guys are able to dominate up front. They occupy blockers, get into the backfield and make plays behind the line of scrimmage. They stuff the run and send the quarterback scrambling, hoping to get a pass away before being taken down.

This year, defensive linemen will take up 16 spots in Delaware Online’s preseason top 75 player rankings, which will be released later.

Quarterback's nightmare: Top defensive linemen in Delaware high school football

🔒PGA players wow Delaware golf fans at BMW Championship

Golf fans watch the 1st round of the PGA's BMW Championship at the Wilmington Country Club, the first ever PGA event held in Delaware, on Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022.
Golf fans watch the 1st round of the PGA's BMW Championship at the Wilmington Country Club, the first ever PGA event held in Delaware, on Thursday, Aug. 18, 2022.

Max Homa was stuck in a sand trap, about 50 feet from the 10th hole during the first round of the BMW Championship on Thursday. Homa had just shanked his approach shot, and he was so mad at himself that he stood there on the fairway doing invisible swings, while his playing partner Jordan Spieth lined up his shot.

As Homa hit his shot out of the bunker, he watched as the ball rolled onto the green, then in the hole for the most unlikely birdie.

"How did he hit that shot?" Landenberg, Pennsylvania, resident Crystal Ward said. "It was exhilarating. When it went in, you’re like, ‘You watch this on TV from the Masters. You don’t watch this in Delaware.'"

And yet, those are the kind of shots that more than 130,000 fans are being treated to this weekend at the Wilmington Country Club, the host of the first-ever PGA Tour event in Delaware.

Read more:'How did he hit that?' PGA players wow Delaware golf fans with shots you wouldn't believe

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