The Bubble Over My Head: The Paradoxical Effect Of Confirmation Bias

Karen says she met “Thomas” on an online dating site and fell in love through text messages and phone calls. She says that when “Thomas,” who claims to be a successful oil rig engineer, told her he was stuck in the Gulf of Mexico, she sent him around $10,000. Karen says when she told him she couldn’t send him more money, “Thomas” said, “that was fine,” and continued texting her. Karen’s daughter, Mindy, disagrees. She says those texts became fewer and farther in-between - until Karen offered to send “Thomas” another $10,000. Mindy says she tried to convince Karen that “Thomas” was catfishing her, but Karen refused to believe her. Dr. Phil shows Karen that the photographs “Thomas” sent to her have been digitally altered, then introduces her to K.D., the real-life person whose images were stolen from social media and used to trick Karen into believing that “Thomas” is a real person. Later, Karen speaks to Tom, whose name and personal details were stolen and used by “Thomas” to scam her. “It’s scary how people can get into what’s called confirmation bias,” says Dr. Phil in The Bubble Over My Head. “If you show them data to the contrary, it has the paradoxical effect of deepening their belief.” Is Karen finally able to admit that she’s been catfished? Watch the video above, then check your local listing to find out where you can watch the conclusion of this two-part Dr. Phil, “Karen’s Catfish: Will She Believe the Truth,” TELL DR. PHIL YOUR STORY: Want Dr. Phil to investigate a situation or possible scam? WATCH: ‘I’m Just So Sorry That Somebody Would Do That,’ Says Man Whose Photos Were Stolen and Used By A Catfish