Our Lady Peace’s turning point on their new album “Curve”

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Our Lady Peace released their new album "Curve" yesterday and lead guitarist Steve Mazur and bassist Duncan Coutts talked to Yahoo! Canada Music before they took the stage for an intimate show at the Phoenix Concert Theatre in Toronto.

The band members credit a few words from their producer and friend, Jason Lader, as the turning point that changed the ultimate direction of "Curve," a record they say is one of the most "adventurous" they have ever done.

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"Jason is a very musical guy. He's a friend of ours [and] we really respect his opinion a lot," Mazur said. "He was over at [singer Raine Maida's] house one day and Raine played him the four or five ideas that we had started to record and Jason said, 'You don't listen to this kind of stuff, why are you making music like this? Why don't you make something that you would want to listen to the way that you listen to the records that you love?'"

Lader's questions led the band to scrapping all of their hard work and starting over again from the beginning, which wasn't as difficult as you would think.

"In considering the life and future of this band, it was a step that we all knew we needed to take in order to continue on," Coutts said. "To challenge each other as individuals, as players [and] as writers, I think that the motivation had to come from within. You know that it might challenge the fans, but you have to be okay with that as an artist."

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The challenge was making an album that was a departure from the ordinary and leap into the extraordinary by taking chances and experimenting during the recording process. An example of this is the fifth track on the album, which is also the anticipated next single, "As Fast As You Can."

"Raine has this great home studio in Los Angeles," Coutts said. "And outside the studio is this long, concrete floored hallway that connects the house to it. We recorded the drums piece by piece, individually, in this long concrete hallway and had microphones up close and way down at the end it."

A method that was new and difficult to capture, Coutts said, "We had to guard the door because if anyone tried to walk through it, they'd screw up the take and I think one of Raine's dogs did make it onto one of the tracks on this record somewhere."

It is experimentation like this that led to the ultimate creation of an album that, in the words of Coutts, was about "more."

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"It's a record that we allowed to be more," the bassist said. "More quiet when it wanted to be, more brash when it wanted to be, more adventurous and experimental in terms of chord progressions. And also, Raine is becoming more cryptic with his lyric writing again and, to me, that's just what defines the record."

Check out "Curve's" first single, "Heavyweight," below and look for the band on their "Urban Grind Tour."

Our Lady Peace — "Heavyweight"

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