Candice Bergen's Dad Cut Her Out of His Will (But She's Got 'Murphy Brown' Money)

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Candice Bergen (Getty Images)
Candice Bergen (Getty Images)

Candice Bergen has a new memoir to promote, which means it's time to spill some juice. That comes today in the form of the revelation that Bergen's father, renowned ventriloquist and radio performer Edgar Bergen, cut her out of his will.

Candice, 68, makes the revelation on an upcoming episode of CBS Sunday Morning where she says she's not sure why her father decided to cut her out, but that she suspects it had something to do with the wild behavior of her youth.

"I was acting out of adolescence in print at a very early age and I often embarrassed my parents," Candice confesses to Jane Pauley. "But I said something that was very hurtful to my father and I think he just slid the bolt."

The actress was a part of the Yippie movement in the 1960s and once participated in a prank in which she and several others threw dollar bills onto the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in 1967, which led to it being temporarily shutdown.

Edgar Bergen with Candice and Charlie (Getty Images)
Edgar Bergen with Candice and Charlie (Getty Images)

Edgar Bergen died of kidney disease in 1978 at 75. The Muppet Movie, which came out one year later and was his final screen appearance, was dedicated to him. Candice was 32 years old at the time of his death. While she got nothing, Edgar's puppet Charlie McCarthy was mentioned in the will. Candice wrote in A Second Chicken Soup for the Woman's Soul that she grew up hating being called "Charlie's sister."

"Charlie McCarthy was not a puppet to my father," Bergen explains during her CBS Sunday Morning interview while discussing her father's puppet, which is now on display at the Smithsonian Museum in Washington, D.C. "He was an alter ego and he was also a separate entity. And my father, I quoted that part of the will that — I can never get over because he said, 'To Charlie McCarthy, from whom I have never been separated even for a day.'"

While Bergen may not have received a cent of her father's fortune, 10 years after his death she took the role that would become her signature and win her five Emmys: Murphy Brown. She's now worth an estimated $25 million.