Black Mirror will be back in 2025 with a sequel to fan-favorite "USS Callister"

Black Mirror
Black Mirror
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Charlie Brooker’s sci-fi anthology Black Mirror has a very loose approach to continuity—which is to say, its episodes exist in a shared universe when it’s interesting for Brooker to do so, and discard the concept when it’d get in the way of the endlessly dark cyber-fun. But while technologies, ideas, and even events have occasionally re-occurred across the show’s six seasons on Netflix, Brooker and his crew have never done a full sequel—until now.

This is per THR, which reports that a) Black Mirror will be back for its seventh season in 2025, arriving with six new episodes of techno-dystopia, and b) one of those episodes will be a direct sequel to fan-favorite installment “USS Callister,” a.k.a. “The one where Jesse Plemons is riffing on Star Trek.” Of course, viewers of the episode will know that it’s considerably darker than that simple logline might suggest, centering as it does on a crew of “digital clones” who are forced to serve at the sci-fi stereotype whims of Plemmons’ character in an online game based on his favorite space show. The episode is also the rare Black Mirror installment to end on something approaching a happy ending, and we can’t be having that, can we?

Here’s the logline for the new episode, which was revealed as part of Netflix’s Next On Netflix event in London this week: “Robert Daly is dead, but for the crew of the USS Callister, their problems are just beginning.” No word yet on casting for the episode, although the original had a very stacked cast, with Plemons tormenting Cristin Milioti, Jimmi Simpson, and Michaela Coel, among others. (Plus cameos from Plemons’ wife, Kirsten Dunst, and old co-worker Aaron Paul, the latter appearing in a voice role years before he’d appear in the show in person.) Among other things, it remains to be seen whether Plemons himself will appear; his character, per the logline, is dead, but in a universe where people can use your DNA to recreate you in a computer game, any awful thing is possible—typical Black Mirror, in other words.