Ben Platt Is Hopeful Dear Evan Hansen Will Show Kids 'Loneliness & Isolation' Is Universal

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Ben Platt Is Hopeful Dear Evan Hansen Will Show Kids 'Loneliness & Isolation' Is Universal
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Ben Platt has high hopes for the upcoming Dear Evan Hansen movie adaption.

The actor, who won a Tony Award for originating the titular role on Broadway, once again stars as troubled teen Evan Hansen in the movie. He tells PEOPLE (The TV Show!) that he hopes the story resonates even more for young kids now, who had trouble during the pandemic isolation.

"This story, I think, especially right now, unfortunately, has such a unique opportunity to make people feel seen and feel part of something larger than themselves and feel so not unique in their loneliness and their isolation. If it wasn't already a universal experience, it certainly is now," Platt says in the video above.

Platt, 27, also talked about starring in the movie with Amy Adams and Julianne Moore and how they inspired him on set.

"It's the most ridiculous embarrassment of riches," he says. "They've given us enough earth-shaking performances to both bow out right now and it would be totally fine and respectful and be incredible, and we'd be like, okay, you've given us more than enough. But the fact that they still come to work with such joy and silliness and respect for the job and have a grateful attitude to even be there, that's so inspiring to me."

RELATED: Ben Platt Says Dear Evan Hansen Movie 'Probably' Wouldn't Have Been Made Without Him

Julianne Moore and Ben Platt attend the "Dear Evan Hansen" Premiere during the 2021 Toronto International Film Festival at Roy Thomson Hall on September 09, 2021 in Toronto, Ontario
Julianne Moore and Ben Platt attend the "Dear Evan Hansen" Premiere during the 2021 Toronto International Film Festival at Roy Thomson Hall on September 09, 2021 in Toronto, Ontario

Emma McIntyre/Getty

Platt recently opened up about the project during an appearance on the Zach Sang Show back in June.

In the chat, Platt responded to critics who questioned whether he was too old to play a high schooler after the release of the film's first trailer.

"People like to have something to say that's negative, regardless of what it is. With [this], it's something that I can't control at all, which is my age, then bring it on," he said. "I'm glad it's not about my performance or my voice or anything that actually matters."

Platt went on to explain more about the film, pointing out the movie — which is produced by his father, Marc Platt, as well as Adam Siegel — would likely not have been made had he not been involved.

"The reaction is largely from people that don't understand the context of the piece," Ben said. "The fact that I created the role and workshopped it for 3 years, and did all of the out-of-town performances, and originated it on Broadway, and received the accolades that I did... and also not really understanding that were I not to do the movie, it probably wouldn't get made."

Dear Evan Hansen
Dear Evan Hansen

Universal Pictures

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He added that, while he'd like to continuously defend himself online, he would rather just let people watch the film themselves.

"My defensive response is to go on Twitter and be like, "Eff you guys, you don't even know that this wouldn't exist without me,' " Ben said. "And of course, that's not true entirely and that's not my place to say."

"All I have to do is let the work speak for itself," he concluded. "Hopefully people will realize that this is engrained in me and there wasn't really any question on anyone actually connected to the piece or who was actually a part of the film, there was never any kind of discussion that it wouldn't be me."

Dear Evan Hansen recently premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival and opens Sept. 24.