Andy Cohen Slams Government's 'Abysmal' Monkeypox Response, Warns His 'Gay Brothers' to Stay Safe

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Things We're Looking Forward to in 2022
Things We're Looking Forward to in 2022

Andy Cohen

Andy Cohen is speaking out about the current monkeypox outbreak.

During an episode of  Watch What Happens Live, the 54-year-old host slammed the government's response to the virus as the United States confirmed 5,811 cases as of August 1.

"Monkeypox cases have risen so dramatically in New York City that Mayor Eric Adams issued an executive order declaring a state of emergency today," Cohen began. "After what's been an abysmal response from our government so far, I'm hoping this new order will help our leaders actually deal with this threat and pressure the federal government to deploy badly needed resources like vaccines, which have been very hard to come by."

Though health experts have reported that many of the cases of monkeypox have been in males who identify as gay or bisexual, Cohen warned his "gay brothers" to stay safe while urging the public not to stigmatize the community as the virus spreads among all demographics.

RELATED: Expert Says Monkeypox Outbreak was Avoidable, Virus Was 'Potential Problem for Decades'

"I want to speak to my gay brothers for a minute," he continued. "We need to take this seriously because this is affecting us at much higher rates than others right now so be aware, get vaccinated if you can and please — I know it's summer and we all have COVID fatigue — but please be safe. Don't take unnecessary risks. I know it's summer, but keep it locked up."

Cohen added: "At the same time, I call on everyone in the government and the media to not stigmatize our community, which is already under attack from many who'd rather use us as a scapegoat than help us and if you're not a gay man you might think this doesn't affect you now, but this is everyone's problem because as we've learned from very recent history, unless we act now these things can get a whole lot worse very quickly."

After sharing the clip on Instagram, many of Cohen's followers praised the TV personality for using his platform to speak on the severity of monkeypox.

"Bravo Andy 👏 Same stigma was placed on AIDS. So, glad you are shedding light on this disease and the lack and availability of the vaccine," one person commented.

Another user wrote: "Not many people are speaking out about this newest threat to our health. Thanks Andy. Be safe everyone. 😢."

RELATED: California Man Details 'Excruciatingly Painful' Monkeypox Recovery to Show 'How Serious This Is'

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On Saturday, New York City Mayor Eric Adams and Dr. Ashwin Vasan, commissioner of the city's department of health and mental hygiene, declared monkeypox a public health emergency in order to slow the spread of the virus by expanding access to vaccines and treatments.

The 'health emergency' declaration is a legal action that allows cities to get access to resources and helps local agencies to coordinate.

"New York City is currently the epicenter of the outbreak, and we estimate that approximately 150,000 New Yorkers may currently be at risk for monkeypox exposure," Adams and Vasan said in a joint statement. "This outbreak must be met with urgency, action, and resources, both nationally and globally, and this declaration of a public health emergency reflects the seriousness of the moment."

The public health emergency came one day after New York Gov. Kathy Hochul issued an executive order declaring a state disaster emergency in response to the outbreak. As of Monday, New York has 1,390 confirmed cases, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"More than one in four monkeypox cases in this country are in New York State, and we need to utilize every tool in our arsenal as we respond," Hochul said. "It's especially important to recognize the ways in which this outbreak is currently having a disproportionate impact on certain at-risk groups. That's why my team and I are working around the clock to secure more vaccines, expand testing capacity and responsibly educate the public on how to stay safe during this outbreak."