6.8-Magnitude Earthquake Strikes Mexico, 3 Days After Another Deadly Quake

·2 min read
People gather outside after an earthquake was felt in Mexico City, . The earthquake struck early Thursday, just three days after a deadly earthquake shook western and central Mexico
People gather outside after an earthquake was felt in Mexico City, . The earthquake struck early Thursday, just three days after a deadly earthquake shook western and central Mexico

Eduardo Verdugo/AP/Shutterstock

A 6.8 magnitude earthquake hit Mexico early Thursday morning, days after another earthquake rocked the country.

Deemed an aftershock by authorities, the seismic event was detected around 1:16 a.m. (2:16 a.m. ET) and centered in the state of Michoacán, just like Monday's 7.6 magnitude earthquake, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

Tremors were felt in Mexico City, Reuters reported, where at least one woman died after falling in her home. Her name was not released by authorities.

In a video posted on Twitter, Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador said the quake was an aftershock and had been felt in Michoacán, Colima, Jalisco, Guerrero and Mexico City.

He added that no major damage had been reported at the time.

RELATED: Earthquake in Mexico Is the Third to Happen on the Same Date: 'It Seems Like a Curse'

A group of people panic outside the Rebsamen School in Mexico City, during the 7.4 magnitude earthquake with epicentre in Michoacán, on September 19, 2022, in Mexico City.
A group of people panic outside the Rebsamen School in Mexico City, during the 7.4 magnitude earthquake with epicentre in Michoacán, on September 19, 2022, in Mexico City.

Gerardo Vieyra/NurPhoto/Shutterstock

On Monday, at least two people died in the earthquake, which came on the same day as two previous tremors had hit the city—one in 1985 and another in 2017.

The Sept. 19, 1985 event resulted in thousands of deaths, according to NBC News, and the one in 2017 killed more than 350 people.

RELATED:  1 Dead, Others Injured After 6.9-Magnitude Earthquake Hits Taiwan and Triggers a Tsunami Warning

"It seems like a curse," Isa Montes, a 34-year-old resident of the city's central Roma neighborhood, told Reuters. Ernesto Lanzetta,  a business owner in the Cuauhtemoc borough of the city, told the outlet, "It's this date. There's something about the 19th. The 19th is a day to be feared."

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Photos of the devastation show buildings collapsed and streets closed off. Areas of the city also experienced power outages, while several hospitals experienced damages.