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A drum-like instrument created by Mexican sculptor Pedro Reyes from parts of seized weapons goes through testing in his workshop in Mexico City, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2013. In the Mexico City workshop mechanical hammers ping against ammunition magazines from assault rifles and pistol parts strike metal plates, like cymbals, to create rhythmic, syncopated sounds, from guns that have caused so many deaths in northern Mexico. Reyes has dedicated his last two years transforming weapons, that were either turned in or seized by the army and police in Ciudad Juarez, into musical instruments for his project titled "Disarm." (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

A drum-like instrument created by Mexican sculptor Pedro Reyes from parts of seized weapons goes through testing in his workshop in Mexico City, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2013. In the Mexico City workshop mechanical hammers ping against ammunition magazines from assault rifles and pistol parts strike metal plates, like cymbals, to create rhythmic, syncopated sounds, from guns that have caused so many deaths in northern Mexico. Reyes has dedicated his last two years transforming weapons, that were either turned in or seized by the army and police in Ciudad Juarez, into musical instruments for his project titled "Disarm." (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

Artist turns guns into musical instruments

February 14, 2013

For the project titled "Disarm," artist Pedro Reyes said he was able to choose his instruments from about 6,700 guns that were turned in or seized by the army and police in Ciudad Juarez,

a city of about 1.3 million people that averaged about 10 killings a

day at the height of the violence. In 2010, Ciudad Juarez, across from El Paso, Texas. Juarez had a murder rate about 230 per 100,000 inhabitants. The nationwide rate for the U.S. that year was 4.8.

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