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A dozen of the deadliest garden plants

Poet's Narcissus (Narcissus poeticus)

Why we grow it: Also known as poet's daffodil, these pretty white bulb flowers, with a yellow center cup much smaller than the common daffodil's, stand up to deer, rabbits, and voles better than other blooms, making them a prime choice for adding a bit of cheer to your beds.

Deadly parts: The entire plant, especially the bulbs, which are potent emetics, inducing vomiting.

Toxic toll: If the scent of a narcissus bouquet in a closed room is strong enough to cause a headache, just imagine what eating an entire bulb might do. Think severe nausea, convulsions, fainting, paralysis and eventual death. Still want to plant them? Watch any open wounds you may have while tending to them—coming into contact with their bulb secretions has produced staggering, numbness, and heart paralysis.

Photo by Flickr user AnneTanne

A dozen of the deadliest garden plants

Your garden may be a relaxing retreat, but it's not a place to let your guard down, especially when it comes to small children and your family's pets. Some popular plants you prize for their ornamental beauty can turn into toxic killers within minutes if ingested, whether consumed out of curiosity or by mistake. With this list you'll know what flowers, shrubs and berries to warn young, inquisitive minds about and which bushes and flowers to keep out of paw's reach. You'll also learn the symptoms of poisoning because—after prevention—rapid treatment is the only defense against death. | By Danielle Blundell, This Old House Online

Also from This Old House:


 Plants to attract beautiful native birds
 Early-spring yard checklist
 Best plants for a healthy, organic garden