finance

Uber is now being run by a 14-person committee

JP Mangalindan
Senior Correspondent
Yahoo Finance

With Uber CEO Travis Kalanick officially taking a leave of absence, and his effective right-hand Emil Michael gone from the company, the day-to-day duties of running Uber now fall to a committee consisting of Kalanick’s direct reports, Yahoo Finance has learned.

With Uber CEO Travis Kalanick taking a leave of absence, the duties of running the ride-hailing company fall to a committee of 14 executives who directly reported to Kalanick.

According to three sources familiar with the matter, Uber will be run by a committee consisting of 14 executives, all of whom directly reported to Kalanick before he announced on Tuesday he would be taking time away from the company following recent scandals and the death of his mother.

Here’s the list of executives now running the show, which includes Liane Hornsey, the Chief Human Resources Officer who spoke at Uber’s all-hands meeting on Tuesday and newly-installed SVP of Business David Richter:

Andrew Macdonald, Regional General Manager, LatAm & APAC
Pierre Dimitri Gore-Coty, Regional General Manager
Rachel Holt, Regional General Manager, US & Canada
Daniel Graf, Vice President, Product Management
David Richter, SVP, Business
Eric Meyhofer, Head of Advanced Technologies Group
Frances Frei, SVP, Leadership & Strategy
Jeff Holden, Chief Product Officer
Jill Hazelbaker, SVP, Policy & Communications
Joe Sullivan, Chief Security Officer
Liane Hornsey, Chief Human Resources Officer
Ryan Graves, SVP, Operations
Salle Yoo, Chief Legal Officer & Corporate Secretary
Thuan Pham, Chief Technology Officer

An Uber spokesperson confirmed the development to Yahoo Finance.

“We have a strong leadership team including veterans who helped make the business what it is today and new talent who are helping to drive the changes we’re committed to making,” the Uber spokesperson told Yahoo Finance. “The entire team is excited by the opportunities ahead of us.”

Whether Uber’s new governing structure succeeds — and how long the team will govern for — are two questions that will follow the executive committee, particularly over the next few days and weeks. With over 12,000 employees, Uber is a large company faced with many layers of decision-making and the serious challenge of transforming Uber’s culture following a recent slew of scandals related to allegations of sexual harassment.

“I think the challenging thing is that Travis was the ultimate decision-maker,” one source familiar with the matter told Yahoo Finance. “Everyone always looked to him for the final ‘yes’ or ‘no.’ This is a group of very diverse personalities, so inevitably, people will pick sides to get their way.”

JP Mangalindan is a senior correspondent for Yahoo Finance covering the intersection of tech and business. Follow him on Twitter or Facebook.  

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