• Business
    Reuters

    Global banks seek to contain damage over $2 trillion of suspicious transfers

    Global banks faced a fresh scandal about dirty money on Monday as they sought to limit the fallout from a cache of leaked documents showing they transferred more than $2 trillion in suspect funds over nearly two decades. Britain-based HSBC Holdings Plc <HSBA.L>, Standard Chartered Plc <STAN.L> and Barclays Plc <BARC.L>, Germany's Deutsche Bank AG <DBKGn.DE> and Commerzbank AG <CBKG.DE>, and U.S.-headquartered JPMorgan Chase & Co <JPM.N> and Bank of New York Mellon Corp <BK.N> were among the lenders named in the report by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists and based on leaked documents obtained by BuzzFeed News.

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  • Politics
    Refinery29

    This Is Amy Coney Barrett, The Potential RBG Replacement Who Hates Your Uterus

    With a vacant seat in the U.S. Supreme Court following the Friday passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, President Donald Trump says he is determined to fill her spot, vowing to nominate a new judge as early as this Friday or Saturday. “I will be putting forth a nominee next week. It will be a woman,” Trump said during a Sept. 19 rally in Fayetteville, North Carolina, just one day after Ginsburg died and her family stated that she hoped “not be replaced until a new president is installed.”While rumored nominees include Barbara Lagoa of the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta, and fellow appeals court judge Allison Jones Rushing, there is one woman who appears to be the frontrunner to flip RBG’s seat: Judge Amy Coney Barrett. And with her name making the top of nearly every speculative list, many are now wondering who Barrett is and what she really stands for. Amy Coney Barrett currently serves the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago, a position she was appointed to by Trump in 2017. A Notre Dame Law School graduate, she began her career in 1998 as a clerk for Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. Under his tutelage, Barrett honed conservative beliefs, including standing against abortion, and has been described as Scalia’s “ideological heir.” According to those who have studied her career more closely, like Marjorie Dannenfelser, president of the Susan B. Anthony List anti-abortion political group, Barrett is “a woman who brings the argument to the court that is potentially the contrary to the views of the sitting women justices.” And by all accounts, this appears to be true, and Barrett plans to continue Scalia’s anti-abortion legacy.During her 2017 confirmation hearing, she made clear that in her new role as judge, she would follow the Supreme Court’s lead in looking to restrict and ban abortion. This is particularly important, considering that in 2018, she was also under consideration to fill the Supreme Court seat that is now occupied by Brett Kavanaugh.The following year, she joined a dissenting opinion in an appeals court case of Planned Parenthood Of Indiana And Kentucky vs. Indiana Health Commissioner, which determined an Indiana law banning patients from having abortions if their fetuses had disabilities — including life-threatening ones.But Barrett’s positions on abortion stem from her personal background and strong religious beliefs. In 2002, she joined her Catholic university’s faculty. At the time, fellow educators actively opposed ideas of secularization, and especially the Supreme Court’s 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling.“Life begins at conception,” she told Notre Dame Magazine, who also described Barrett’s view on Roe v. Wade as “creating through judicial fiat a framework of abortion on demand.”  For her part, Barrett is a practicing Roman Catholic and mother of seven. She is well-known throughout conservative circles for putting her religious convictions at the forefront of her work and identity. “Her religious convictions are pro-life, and she lives those convictions,” said U.S. district Judge Patrick J. Schiltz, one of her mentors.“I think the question of whether people can get very late-term abortions, you know, how many restrictions can be put on clinics, I think that would change,” Barrett said during a talk she gave on Roe v. Wade at Jacksonville University in 2016.Barrett’s nomination could stand to change everything for the Supreme Court. On Nov. 10, when the Supreme Court is back in session, they will once again hear arguments challenging the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act. With Barrett in the seat, women’s access to reproductive health could be in serious jeopardy. If Trump does nominate Barrett — a noted anti-abortionist — it would solidify fears for millions of Democrats: a 6-3 conservative majority in the Supreme Court that will most definitely derail years of inclusive healthcare initiatives. And, considering Ginsburg’s tenure protecting women’s rights and elevating social justice initiatives, Trump would actively be opposing her legacy by appointing Barrett, putting millions of vulnerable people at risk.“Amy Coney Barrett meets Donald Trump’s two main litmus tests,” Nan Aron, the president of Alliance for Justice, told the New York Times. “She has made clear she would invalidate the ACA and take health care away from millions of people and undermine a woman’s reproductive freedom.” Like what you see? How about some more R29 goodness, right here?In The Wake Of RBG's Death, What Happens Next?Mitch McConnell Wasted No Time Being Human GarbageYou Owe Ruth Bader Ginsburg More Than You Know

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  • Business
    USA TODAY

    What could our lives be like in 2025? Futurists think Americans may eat, fly and go to school differently post-COVID

    After the pandemic, futurists forecast a remote world with merged brands, less meat, more air purifiers and stadiums filled with people

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  • Style
    Footwear News

    Hailey Baldwin Accents a Little Black Bikini With Her Go-To Nike Kicks

    Sneakers and bathing suits are Baldwin's new favorite outfit combo.

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  • Lifestyle
    Eat This, Not That!

    Costco Abruptly Removes This Popular Cheese Brand From Its Stores

    After a controversial social media statement made by the owner of a fan-favorite cheese brand, Costco has abruptly removed the company's cheese from their stores. (To find out which items may soon be gone from grocery stores, check out 8 Grocery Items That May Soon Be in Short Supply.)In August, Brian Henry, mayor of Pawleys Island, South Carolina, and the owner of Palmetto Cheese, caused widespread disapproval and calls for a boycott when he published a statement on his Facebook page calling the Black Lives Matter movement a "terror organization." And it looks like Costco has paid close attention to the public outcry, because the chain has reportedly removed Palmetto's popular pimento cheese from all 120 of its locations that carried it.The "pimento cheese with soul", as the packaging calls it, has been pulled from Costco's shelves and website overnight, but the company still hasn't clarified whether the removal is temporary or permanent.But it does seem like the retailer wanted to make it clear to their customers that the shortage of said cheese they are about to encounter wasn't an accident. In a statement posted on the shelf next to the remaining Palmetto products spotted at one location, the retailer said: "The * (asterisk) on this sign means that these 2 items are discontinued and will not be re-ordered by Costco. Over 120 Costco's throughout the US are no longer carrying this item."While Henry confirmed the chain cut his products from their lineup, he had a much more optimistic view. "Costco rotates items in and out during the course of the year. They will occasionally add and drop products as a matter of normal business. We remain optimistic that Palmetto Cheese will be back on the shelves in the not too distant future," he told media outlets.The focus on the pimento cheese product has also brought into question its origin. After allegations that the original recipe for it was "stolen" from Vertrella Brown, a Black employee of the brand whose likeness is used on the product's packaging, Henry denied the accusations in a press conference. "Unfortunately, there have been comments on social media and news outlets falsely suggesting that Vertrella Brown created the recipe for Palmetto Cheese. However, that is simply not true. The recipe for Palmetto Cheese is, and always has been, Sassy Henry's recipe," he stated, crediting his wife with inventing the winning cheese formula.He also announced that a rebranding effort aiming "to be more sensitive to cultural diversity" is underway for Palmetto Cheese. To learn what other food brands have changed the names and packaging of their products this year due to racial insensitivity, check out 10 Groceries You'll Never Find Under the Same Name Again.Don't forget to sign up for our newsletter to get the latest grocery news delivered straight to your inbox.Read the original article on Eat This, Not That!

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