• Entertainment
    The Wrap

    ‘Hamilton': Celebs Voice Mixed Reactions, From ‘Magical’ to ‘Dangerously’ Omits ‘Realities of Slavery’

    The filmed version of Broadway’s smash hit “Hamilton” is drawing both praise and criticism, with some showering it with compliments of artistic “genius” and others noting the liberties taken with the total truth of the time.The July 3 debut on Disney+ of the musical, written, composed by and starring Lin-Manuel Miranda, is set in the late 1700s and tells the story of one of America’s Founding Fathers, Alexander Hamilton, at a time when the new nation was wrought with slavery, social inequity and civil unrest.Celebrities from across industries weighed in with their thoughts on Friday and Saturday, from “Frozen” actor Josh Gad calling the show “magical” and “pure genius,” to author Rozanne Gay saying it “dangerously elides they [sic] realities of slavery.”Also Read: A 'Hamilton' Newbie's Take on the Disney+ Version of Lin-Manuel Miranda's Powerful Musical“The first time I ever saw @DaveedDiggs on stage in Hamilton I turned to my friend and said ‘this is one of the single most inspired performances I have ever witnessed in my life,'” Gad wrote. “Daveed exudes electricity when he opens his mouth. It’s remarkable. Pure genius. Magical.”But New York Times best-selling author and social commentator Roxane Gay made a point to both honor the actors’ performances and point out some issues she has with the way the show “idealizes” America’s founding fathers.“I have a lot of thoughts about Hamilton and the way it idealizes the founders, and how such a brilliant musical dangerously elides they [sic] realities of slavery,” Gay wrote in a thread. “But Leslie Odom Jr. put his FOOT in that performance. So talented.”“I think it’s a brilliant show. As I said. It’s not some vulnerable upstart. The show can handle critical engagement and the performances and book and music will still be absolutely incredible,” she continued. “Also Helpless/Satisfied are such a perfect pair of songs. Ugh. But then the Sally Hemings moment played for laughs. Whyyyyyy.”Also Read: 'Hamilton' Film Review: Can't Afford Broadway? Now You Can Be in the Room Where It HappenedCrissle West, a writer and comedian known for co-hosting the podcast “The Read” and for starring in the Harriet Tubman and Marsha P. Johnson episodes of “Drunk History,” also had mixed feelings about the show.“I knew hamilton was gonna be ahistorical as soon as I saw black people onstage and not playing slaves. i still enjoy the show,” she wrote.Miranda himself also did a lot of tweeting about the show Friday, taking a moment to thank the show’s fans.“Thank you for tonight. I’m so grateful you just have the whole thing now. With this extraordinary company and crew. It’s yours,” he wrote.Star Leslie Odom Jr. also shared warm feelings about “Hamilton.”“No two Hamilton shows were the same. This performance was special because in some small + indescribable way, they all were,” he wrote. “Like jazz. You walk out onstage and surrender to the ride.”Also Read: Disney+ in July: Here's Everything New ComingSherrilyn Ifill, president and director-counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, thanked Lin-Manuel Miranda for “lifting” her from her “anger and disillusionment.”“I needed this tonight. Transported again. And healed,” Ifill wrote. “Thank you @Lin_Manuel and this extraordinary cast for returning to the joy of this extraordinary work. Lifting me from my anger & disillusionment – reminding me that our creativity & vision is the secret to our liberation.”Read these and more reactions below:The first time I ever saw @DaveedDiggs on stage in Hamilton I turned to my friend and said “this is one of the single most inspired performances I have ever witnessed in my life.” Daveed exudes electricity when he opens his mouth. It’s remarkable. Pure genius. Magical. pic.twitter.com/IHiYeNYSIm— Josh Gad (@joshgad) July 4, 2020I needed this tonight. Transported again. And healed. Thank you @Lin_Manuel and this extraordinary cast for returning to the joy of this extraordinary work. Lifting me from my anger & disillusionment – reminding me that our creativity & vision is the secret to our liberation.— Sherrilyn Ifill (@Sifill_LDF) July 4, 2020I have a lot of thoughts about Hamilton and the way it idealizes the founders, and how such a brilliant musical dangerously elides they realities of slavery but Leslie Odom Jr. put his FOOT in that performance. So talented.— roxane gay (@rgay) July 4, 2020Thank you for tonight. I'm so grateful you just have the whole thing now. With this extraordinary company and crew. It's yours.— Lin-Manuel Miranda (@Lin_Manuel) July 4, 2020Hamilton was written to flatter the monarch (Barack Obama) in his court, the same basic genesis as a lot of Shakespearean tragedies and histories. Ideologically, that’s what it does: it’s designed to reinforce Obama’s worldview.Irrespective of that, I think it’s very good.— David Klion (@DavidKlion) July 4, 2020i knew hamilton was gonna be ahistorical as soon as I saw black people onstage and not playing slaves. i still enjoy the show.— king crissle (@crissles) July 4, 2020It is this moment that I hope you realize why the show is called Hamilton and not Alexander Hamilton. The show is about Alex and Eliza. Look at everything she did. hamilfilm— Andrew Chappelle (@Achapphawk) July 4, 2020There's nothing to debate. It's a thoroughgoing fantasy. The real Hamilton was a literal plutocrat, who wanted to turn debtors into veritable vassals of a strong state, not some admirable multiculti hero. https://t.co/f3OKmst4Rl— Rick Perlstein (@rickperlstein) July 3, 2020Read original story ‘Hamilton': Celebs Voice Mixed Reactions, From ‘Magical’ to ‘Dangerously’ Omits ‘Realities of Slavery’ At TheWrap

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  • Business
    Bloomberg

    World’s Largest Pension Fund Loses $165 Billion in Worst Quarter

    (Bloomberg) -- The world’s biggest pension fund posted a record loss in the first three months of 2020 after the coronavirus pandemic sparked a global market rout in the period.Japan’s Government Pension Investment Fund lost 11%, or 17.7 trillion yen ($164.7 billion), in the three months ended March, it said in Tokyo on Friday. The decline in value was the steepest based on comparable data back to April 2008, reducing the fund’s total assets to 150.63 trillion yen. Foreign stocks were the worst performing investment, followed by domestic equities.The results come just months after the fund revamped top management and revised its asset allocation to focus more on overseas debt. The loss, which wiped out gains for the fiscal year, may attract political attention as social security remains a major concern for tens of millions of Japan’s retirees.“The decline in domestic and foreign equities led to a negative return for the fiscal year,” said Masataka Miyazono, the president of GPIF. “Both equity markets performed strongly during 2019 even under pressures from the U.S.-China trade negotiations. The global coronavirus pandemic led to investors taking a risk-off stance.”Overseas bonds were the only major asset to generate a positive quarterly return. The securities gained 0.5%, compared with losses of 0.5% for domestic bonds, 18% for local equities and 22% for foreign stocks. In April, GPIF raised its asset allocation to foreign bonds by 10 percentage points to 25%, while keeping the target for foreign and domestic stocks unchanged at 25%.Naoki Fujiwara, the chief fund manager at Shinkin Asset Management Co., said the losses were expected. Equities have rebounded since March, so the pension fund should be recouping losses for the April-June period, Fujiwara said.“The current portfolio is exposed to equity volatility,” he said. “We’re in a low-yield environment right now, and will likely be for the next two years, so maybe it’s alright for now, but in the long run, the pension fund should correct the allocation of equities.”Read more: An Ex-Goldman Bond Trader’s Quiet Rise to Managing $1.6 TrillionUnder the new guidance of GPIF President Miyazono and Chief Investment Officer Eiji Ueda, the fund must navigate a volatile market torn between an ongoing coronavirus pandemic and promises of economic stimulus measures. Fears of a second wave of outbreak are already hampering the global equity markets recovery.The GPIF isn’t rushing to buy foreign bonds, which are 3% below its allocation target, Miyazono told reporters in Tokyo. The fund has a long-term investment timeframe much longer than 10-20 years, he said, adding that there will be no impact on pension payouts from a single year’s results.Investments in ESG indices reached a record high of 5.7 trillion yen. The GPIF, a leader in socially responsible investing, has invested in indexes such as the FTSE Blossom Japan, MSCI Japan ESG Select Leaders and MSCI Japan Empowering Women.During the January-March quarter, the MSCI All-Country World Index of global stocks slumped 22%, the worst since the global financial crisis. Yields on the 10-year U.S. Treasuries slumped 125 basis points to near record lows during the same period, fueled by unprecedented measures from the U.S. Federal Reserve and intense demand for haven assets. From April, the GPIF has adjusted its portfolio, setting a general target to keep 25% each in all four asset classes, with the allocation of each assets allowed to deviate by different ranges.(Adds second chart, ESG holdings in 10th paragraph)For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

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  • Health
    Yahoo News Canada

    'I don't think we're going to be able to contain this virus:' Fears of second wave loom large

    Experts largely agree collectively Canada has done a good job against limiting spread, but with the virus remaining active it still has plenty of potential hosts.

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  • World
    BBC

    Coronavirus: Japan's mysteriously low virus death rate

    Japan had no lockdown, it has an elderly population - so why haven't more people died from Covid-19?

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