• U.S.
    ABC News

    CDC and WHO offer conflicting advice on masks. An expert tells us why

    The World Health Organization issued new guidance this week that may seem confusing to Americans, who have been advised by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to wear cloth face masks in public to help slow the spread of COVID-19. "If you are healthy, you only need to wear a mask if you are taking care of a person with COVID-19," the newly updated WHO guidelines read. Both organizations are considered to be reliable, authoritative sources of public health information.

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  • U.S.
    The Guardian

    Trudeau: Canadians watching US unrest and police violence in ‘shock and horror’

    Prime minister condemned racism and called on Canada to ‘stand together in solidarity’ against racial hate as protests continue in US * George Floyd killing – follow live updatesCanadians are watching unrest and police violence in the United States in “shock and horror”, Justin Trudeau said on Friday – but the prime minister cautioned that his country also has entrenched problems with racism. The city of Minneapolis has been rocked by a third night of violent protests over the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man, after a white police officer knelt on his neck as he lay on the ground following arrest. “Many Canadians of diverse backgrounds are watching, like all Canadians are, the news out of the United States with shock and with horror,” Trudeau told reporters at a daily briefing.“Anti-black racism – racism – is real. It’s in the United States but it’s also in Canada and we know people are facing systemic discrimination, unconscious bias and anti-black racism every single day,” said Trudeau, calling on the country to “stand together in solidarity” against racial hate. “We have work to do as well in Canada.” Racial inequities continue to persist throughout the country – a grim reality that is often apparent during interactions with police. In December 2018, the province of Ontario released a landmark report that found black residents in Toronto – the country’s largest city – are 20 times more likely to be shot dead by the police than white residents. “It’s a very Canadian tradition to speak in platitudes, to refer to the underground railroad and to speak about Canada as a haven and a place that acknowledges its past mistakes,” said Robyn Maynard, author of Policing Black Lives. “But we continue to see similar structural harms and structural kinds of violence as we do in places where leaders make more overtly vitriolic statements towards black communities.”Last month, 26-year-old D’Andre Campbell was shot dead by police inside his own home, north of Toronto, after Campbell himself called 911.Earlier this week, the family of Regis Korchinski-Paquet said a police officer shoved the young woman over the balcony of the family’s 24th-floor apartment, where she fell to her death. The case is currently under investigation by an arms-length police watchdog.Maynard also pointed out the coronavirus pandemic continues to have a disproportionate impact on black and indigenous residents, who are overrepresented in the country’s prison population.“We continue to see prisons and jails being epicentres of outbreaks,” she said. “Yet there is failure on the part of the federal government to meaningfully release to release prisoners.”Trudeau’s unprompted remarks marked a notable departure for a leader who has gone to great lengths to avoid irritating his US counterpart, Donald Trump.Canadian prime ministers have traditionally refrained from discussing political and social turmoil in the US – Canada’s main ally and largest trading partner. Justin Trudeau has long spoken about the need to tackle racism, but his re-election campaign was marred by pictures of him in blackface as a young man.

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  • U.S.
    The Independent

    Minneapolis police officer who knelt on George Floyd’s neck had 18 previous internal complaints against him

    The Minneapolis police officer who was filmed kneeling on George Floyd’s neck for several minutes even as he said “I can’t breathe” has previously been the subject of multiple complaints filed to the Minneapolis Police Department’s Internal Affairs Division, it has emerged.Mr Chauvin, who has been fired along with the other three police officers who apprehended Mr Floyd, was reported to the division 18 times. According to a police summary, only two of the complaints were “closed with discipline”.

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  • Science
    Popular Mechanics

    Welp, SpaceX's Starship Prototype Just Blew Up

    Rocketry is hard.

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  • Business
    The Wrap

    Mark Zuckerberg Says Trump’s Minneapolis Shooting Post Did Not Violate Facebook’s Policies

    Mark Zuckerberg said that Facebook allowed President Trump’s post about “shooting” protesters in Minneapolis to remain on its platform because “people need to know if the government is planning to deploy force.”“Although the post had a troubling historical reference, we decided to leave it up because the National Guard references meant we read it as a warning about state action, and we think people need to know if the government is planning to deploy force,” Zuckerberg wrote in a post on Friday. “Our policy around incitement of violence allows discussion around state use of force, although I think today’s situation raises important questions about what potential limits of that discussion should be.”Trump’s Facebook post in question included the same comments he made on Twitter about how “when the looting starts, the shooting starts” — comments that have a racist historical context and led Twitter to place a content warning on his tweet for “glorifying violence.”Also Read: Facebook, Twitter Respond to Trump's Social Media Order: It 'Will Restrict More Speech Online, Not Less'But Zuckerberg, who said he personally had a “visceral negative reaction” to the “divisive and inflammatory rhetoric” used in Trump’s post, said that Facebook did not have a policy of “putting a warning in front of posts that may incite violence.”“We believe that if a post incites violence, it should be removed regardless of whether it is newsworthy, even if it comes from a politician. We have been in touch with the White House today to explain these policies as well,” Zuckerberg said.Mark Zuckerberg also pointed to a subsequent post that Trump made, in which the president said his looting and shooting phrase was “spoken as a fact, not as a statement” and that he didn’t “want this to happen.”Also Read: Twitter Hits Trump With Content Warning for Tweet 'Glorifying Violence'“We decided that this post, which explicitly discouraged violence, also does not violate our policies and is important for people to see,” Zuckerberg said.“I know people are frustrated when we take a long time to make these decisions. These are difficult decisions and, just like today, the content we leave up I often find deeply offensive. We try to think through all the consequences, and we keep our policies under constant review because the context is always evolving,” Zuckerberg continued. “People can agree or disagree on where we should draw the line, but I hope they understand our overall philosophy is that it is better to have this discussion out in the open, especially when the stakes are so high. I disagree strongly with how the President spoke about this, but I believe people should be able to see this for themselves, because ultimately accountability for those in positions of power can only happen when their speech is scrutinized out in the open.”Read Mark Zuckerberg’s full post here.Read original story Mark Zuckerberg Says Trump’s Minneapolis Shooting Post Did Not Violate Facebook’s Policies At TheWrap

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