• Politics
    The Daily Beast

    Is Accused Stalker and Kushner Family Friend Ken Kurson Donald Trump’s Most Disturbing Pardon?

    Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/Photo GettyOn the day that Joe Biden was inaugurated as the 46th president of the United States, a Facebook friend of former New York Observer editor-in-chief Ken Kurson’s wrote on his wall, “Congrats on being pardoned for your crimes, I guess.”Kurson, a longtime close friend of Jared Kushner’s, had been arrested in October on charges of cyberstalking three people and harassing two in an elaborate revenge scheme to punish people he perceived as being responsible for the breakup of his marriage. Kurson, who has forcefully denied the allegations and had yet to go to trial, was one of the 74 people Donald Trump pardoned in the final hours of his presidency.There are three reasons Kurson’s pardon stood out to me. First, because I know him. I was the editor in chief of The New York Observer in 2011 and 2012, and Kurson, despite his limited background in journalism, was one of my successors. I met him early in my tenure at the paper that Jared Kushner had purchased a few years after graduating from Harvard, because Kurson—a Republican political consultant who worked for Rudy Giuliani’s consulting firm, helped write his book Leadership and helped run his 2008 presidential campaign—was a close family friend who always seemed to be at events, in the office, or wherever the Kushners were. Second, while many of Trump’s pardons went to political cronies who’d committed crimes more or less on his behalf, Kurson’s was an obvious favor to Jared Kushner, whose father, Charles, also received a pardon. And finally, Kurson’s pardon stood out because of the ongoing threat that some of the people he allegedly stalked and harassed fear that he may pose to them now.Trump Family Pal Arrested for Harassment in Post-Divorce MeltdownA bit about the case: According to the complaint filed by the U.S. Attorney’s Office in the Eastern District of New York, which stemmed from an FBI background check as he was being vetted for an honorary White House role, Kurson was convinced in 2015 that his marriage had been undermined by a friend of his now ex-wife’s, a doctor at Mount Sinai Hospital. Using pseudonyms like “Jayden Wagner” and “Eddie Train,” Kurson allegedly began digitally tormenting the former friend and two of her colleagues. He also allegedly harassed another woman, who The New York Times identifies as his ex-wife, who filed a restraining order. Also outlined in the complaint: the alleged harassment included making false complaints with the victims’ employers, alleging inappropriate conduct with a minor, and claiming one of the victims was having an affair with her boss. He was accused of installing a keystroke monitor on one victim’s computer and using it to access their social media accounts. And, the complaint says, he showed up at Mount Sinai, asked about the doctor’s schedule and took photos of the lobby, which he then attached to negative Yelp reviews smearing the doctor. She got hang-ups on her cellphone and on her apartment phone that could only receive calls from other people inside the building. Mount Sinai increased its security presence in response. ‘A terrifying mix of male entitlement and our lawless digital frontier’When I first read about the charges, I was floored by the sheer amount of effort Kurson allegedly made to plot against and then pursue his victims on multiple fronts. Then again, a lot of stalkers do this in part because it’s easy to do. Anyone with an internet connection can conduct a campaign like this, and most people can do it without getting caught. Even if the perpetrators are caught, victims have very little recourse because cops and prosecutors are often ill-equipped to deal with activity of this nature, and sometimes dismissive when it’s directed toward women.I work in politics now—my firm does polling and digital strategy—and one of my former political clients is Brianna Wu, who ran for Congress in Massachusetts. Brianna is probably best known as a technology entrepreneur who was one of the figures at the center of the Gamergate scandal, which involved a long campaign of cyberharassment against women who spoke out about sexism in gaming. She has moved houses, beefed up security and taken all of the precautions she can to protect herself from people who harass her, often anonymously, and in some cases, have showed up at her house. Someone threw a brick through her front window once. She still receives death threats, regularly.When I spoke to her on Thursday, she pointed out that another common harassment tactic is to spin up anonymous accounts to destroy the victim’s reputation. This is what Kurson allegedly tried to do with the doctor by smearing her on Yelp and making false accusations to her bosses. That “isn’t even unique,” she said, noting how easy reputation destruction can be: “It’s a terrifying mix of male entitlement and our lawless digital frontier.”Robbie Kaplan, a civil rights attorney best known for successfully arguing against the Defense of Marriage Act in the groundbreaking United States v. Windsor case that effectively legalized gay marriage and who is also representing E. Jean Carroll in her defamation case against Donald Trump, echoed Brianna’s assessment. “The combination of abusive men and the relatively few guardrails on social media can potentially, and often does create a very dangerous situation.” Not only can predatory men use digital tools to harass people themselves, they can also hire or encourage other people to do it via bots and fake accounts, and seeding campaigns on social media platforms.When Brianna first experienced anonymous threats, she went to local law enforcement. They didn’t know what to do with it. She called the FBI. They couldn’t do anything. She talked to local prosecutors. They were no help, either.“So what can you do with these threats?” she said. “Nothing. It’s just background radiation in my life now.”One of the worst incidents for Brianna wasn’t even a death threat but “a false rumor that I had killed my dog.” Her dog, Crash, had died during the middle of Gamergate and, she recalls, “people were sending me photoshopped (pictures) of my dog on fire.”Brianna points out the Trump pardon sets a particularly bad precedent because the Kurson case was one where it seemed to her like the victims might actually get justice, which is all too rare. She also holds platforms that enable this kind of harassment responsible. There’s a mentality that the Internet is the Wild West, where anything goes.She also notes, almost as an afterthought, that women who work in tech and are parents are often doubly silenced by even the prospect of this kind of harassment because they worry that their children could be targeted, too.‘I’m terrified I’m going to be looking over my shoulder every day’The alleged events at Mount Sinai all happened while Kurson was the editor of the Observer. During that time, he also allegedly sexually harassed the writer and journalist Deborah Copaken, who never filed charges but later wrote in The Atlantic about her experience with him. (Asked to comment on Copaken’s essay by The New York Times, Kurson denied any inappropriate behavior.)And during that time, Kurson, who has repeatedly said that his ties to the Trump administration did not affect the paper’s coverage, was caught advising the Trump campaign on a speech to AIPAC and was spotted in the Trump family box at the Republican National Convention. His Observer tenure is perhaps best remembered for the 7,000-word smear piece that he assigned on then New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman, who was suing Trump University.On Wednesday, I spoke to Deborah Copaken, who said her partner told her at about 4 a.m. that Kurson had been pardoned. She then spent inauguration day talking to two lawyers and a security expert wanting to know if she should be afraid, and asking for advice about what to do. She was waiting to hear back after emailing the FBI agent she had spoken with when Kurson was being investigated.“This should have been a really great day,” said Copaken, referring to Biden’s inauguration, “and instead I spent today in a PTSD fugue state. I’m terrified I’m going to be looking over my shoulder every day.”The Trump administration’s description of the pardon notes that his ex-wife never wanted an investigation and asked the FBI to drop it. It doesn’t mention his other alleged victims.Here I should mention that I’ve met Kurson’s ex-wife because I went to dinner with several Observer staffers at their house once. My now husband was running the Observer’s commercial real estate trade publication and Kurson was his boss. His wife was warm and friendly and I only remember good things about her.But another moment from that dinner sticks out. When I first met Kurson years prior, during my own Observer tenure, I thought of him as a kind of goofy and essentially harmless person. He was friendly, talkative, and very solicitous of everyone he met. Sometimes he would act overfamiliar, hover a little too closely, do other things that gave me a bit of a creepy vibe, but I thought it might just be an innocuous failure to read social cues.At the dinner, which consisted of maybe eight to ten people around a large family style table, we all had a group discussion, much of which was pleasant. But at some point, someone brought up the editor of a New Jersey newspaper that heavily covered Jared Kushner’s father Charlie’s trial and sentencing. Kurson, who had been affable a second earlier, exploded. He said he hated that guy and wanted to kill him. The air went out of the room. People use the expression “I want to kill him” all the time to express that they’re angry. But Kurson said it in a way that made everyone uncomfortable. There seemed to be genuine rage there.On some level, I understand Copaken’s fears about what Kurson might be capable of doing now, and how he might retaliate if she spoke up again about him. I’ve been publicly very critical of Jared Kushner, and I know from experience that both he and his father, a former felon who was also pardoned by the Trump administration, are vindictive and unafraid of consequences. Every time I write about Jared, I put the very rational self-preservation-oriented thoughts in my brain that he has the money and resources to hurt me in a box and I pretend it’s not there.This is something I’ve learned as a journalist and I’ve done the same thing when I’ve gotten threats from Scientologists, legal threats from insanely wealthy people, and subjects who don’t like reporting threatening to ruin me, not to mention the kind of anonymous online death and rape threats women columnists get as a matter of course. This kind of self-delusion is the only way I can do my job. But it has certainly occurred to me that writing this piece puts me on Kurson’s radar, and back on Jared’s.Copaken hopes that being public about what she says Kurson did in the past might offer some protection if he acted the same way now. That at least people would be more inclined to believe her. She says she’s spoken since Kurson’s pardon was announced to other women who allege that he harassed him, and that they have similar concerns.“Victims have no rights,” she said. “And these are crazy games we’re playing with our own safety.“Maybe we should set up a GoFundMe for women who need protection now.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.

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  • U.S.
    Axios

    Biden wants to cancel $10k per person of student loan debt. But it won't address the root issue

    Data: New York Fed Consumer Credit Panel/Equifax; Chart: Axios VisualsThere’s a growing consensus among Americans who want President Biden to cancel student debt — but addressing the ballooning debt burden is much more complicated than it seems.Why it matters: Student debt is stopping millions of Americans from buying homes, buying cars and starting families. And the crisis is rapidly getting worse.Support safe, smart, sane journalism. Sign up for Axios Newsletters here.By the numbers: Student debt — which stands at $1.55 trillion — is the biggest category of debt Americans owe, aside from mortgages. * Most borrowers are white, but Black college graduates owe an average of $25,000 more than their white counterparts. * According to a new Harris Poll survey, 64% of Americans support canceling some student debt, and 55% support canceling all of it.What's happening: Biden has proposed immediately cancelling $10,000 of federal student loan debt for every borrower. The move would cost around $370 billion. * That would eliminate debt for the 15 million borrowers that owe $10,000 or less — a broad-based approach that would help all 42 million borrowers.Yes, but: Here's what that alone wouldn't do: * It wouldn't make much of a difference for the nearly 30 million borrowers who owe more than $10,000. Many of them went to graduate school and owe hundreds of thousands. * It wouldn't stimulate the economy. Student debt stops many from investing or buying property, which is a drag on the economy, but canceling a small amount of debt wouldn't change that, experts say. * It wouldn’t target the most vulnerable borrowers. Canceling the same amount of debt for all doesn’t account for the fact that many Americans with student debt are also among the most well-educated and high-earning individuals. * It wouldn't help future borrowers. “The problem with forgiving student debt is that every day we’re making new loans in this broken system,” says Adam Looney, an economist at the University of Utah. “You’ve not solved the problem.”Insurmountable student debt is a recent phenomenon, Looney says. It's been growing at six times the rate of the U.S. economy, and it's only getting worse. * There are no limits on how much students can borrow and few restrictions on how they spend the money. * And, on top of that, the cost of college and graduate school is skyrocketing. As a result, young people are borrowing sums of money they can’t possibly repay and many are using that money to pursue degrees at online or for-profit colleges with higher than average dropout rates.What we're watching: Among the American public, canceling debt isn't a fringe or far-left idea any more. * In the Harris Poll survey, 78% support putting restrictions on the price of a university education. And 59% support no tuition at public universities.Be smart: sign up FREE for the most influential newsletter in America.

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  • Lifestyle
    Refinery29

    Your Horoscope This Week

    The start of the week has an edge to it. On Tuesday, the ego-ruling Sun forms a square against change-making Uranus. We’ll be itching to move on to the next big thing. Navigating this nervous energy will require patience — with ourselves and others. Keeping our schedules simple and carefully taking small steps can help us maintain a positive mindset. Thursday is a good day to meditate on how we'd like to create more satisfaction from your relationships, as charming Venus forms a conjunction with powerful Pluto. This transit offers a double whammy of emotional energy: We're able to attract others with ease, and we're especially sensitive to each other's feelings. We should act and speak with honesty to build strong relationships during this transit, and not be afraid to create healthy boundaries. We're craving the spotlight on Thursday as well, as the emotion-ruling Moon waxes full in proud Leo at 2:16 P.M. EST. Feelings will run high as the Moon creates a square against innovative Uranus and fiery Mars, so we’ll have to do our best to manage any drama that arises with grace. The Moon will also oppose lucky Jupiter and rule-making Saturn, making it a day of jumping through hoops to make others happy. Here’s where those boundaries come in handy again: We can't please everyone, and that's okay. Later on in the day, we'll be feeling more optimistic about our goals as the ego-ruling Sun forms a conjunction with bountiful Jupiter. It's a beautiful transit to reach out to someone who needs a helping hand and encourage others. But we’ll have to try to be mindful of our words, lest we come off as boastful or braggy.On Saturday, it's time to begin conserving our energy and slow down as messenger Mercury stations retrograde in independent Aquarius. When the communication planet moves in reverse, he puts more responsibility on getting back to friends, family, and colleagues. We’ll want to make sure to check our texts, inboxes, draft folders, and junk mail to ensure that we’re on top of our correspondence. Getting ghosted hurts, even if it's not on purpose. Life might be looking a little different as we navigate this transit, but it's a great time to be extra-cautious about how we come across, find lost things, and reminisce. We can think of it as an opportunity to reconnect with our inner voice, and rediscover our rebellious side. AriesMarch 21 to April 19Does your space need some added flair, Aries? You could be in the mood to spice up your home decor on Thursday afternoon, when your domestic-ruling Moon waxes full in luxurious Leo. The moon creates a square against ruling Mars (so be prepared to negotiate design decisions if you share your space) and opposes career-minded Saturn and intellectual Jupiter (so consider your professional image while making decorating choices; place a plant where it’ll spruce up your Zoom screen, for instance). On Thursday, the creative-governing Sun in your 11th house of groups, friendships, and goals forms a conjunction with philosophical Jupiter, encouraging you to get social. If you’ve been thinking about kicking off a group project, this is a good day to organize a brainstorming session with your besties. Prepare to accept little speed bumps in your day on Saturday, as routine-ruling Mercury stations retrograde in easy-going Aquarius. Be flexible and figure out solutions as you go. TaurusApril 20 to May 20Feeling constrained by your space, Taurus? Consider carving out a new place to get your work done on Tuesday, as the domestic-ruling Sun in your 10th house of career, structure, and public image forms a square against status-minded Uranus. This transit can be tense, so research simple solutions that help you to create tranquility and nurture your mind and if you notice yourself getting frustrated, take action to create harmony ASAP. On Thursday, ruling Venus creates a conjunction with passionate Pluto. If you're in a relationship, take advantage by blowing off some steam in the bedroom. Single? Your powers of attraction are growing, and you're able to capture the attention of both friends and possible romantic interests. Make sure you use your powers for good, as this transit can go off the rails when used to manipulate. Money-ruling Mercury stations retrograde in independent Aquarius on Saturday, encouraging you to be extra-cautious with your cash. It's best to use this transit to analyze your spending and get a little thrifty. Work to understand your spending habits better so that you can save for an exciting future goal. GeminiMay 21 to June 20Is it time to treat yourself, Gemini? You may want to keep your spending on the smaller side on Thursday, when your money-ruling Moon waxes full in royal Leo. This Moon opposes love-minded Jupiter, encouraging you to keep your relationships in mind before you break out your wallet. You may need a reality check before deciding to buy something — talk to your partner about the purchase, or ask yourself if you’d be better off tucking the money away for a big-ticket splurge down the road. Like travel: Also on Thursday, the Sun in your 9th house of exploration, adventure, and belief forms a conjunction with love-ruling Jupiter, putting you in the mood to hit the road. Start planning now, and when it's safe to travel again, you could embark on a once-in-a-lifetime journey. Learn to love yourself more fully starting on Saturday, as ruling Mercury stations retrograde in eccentric Aquarius. Find a hobby that allows you to explore new talent and encourages your creative side. CancerJune 21 to July 22Are you ready for a change, Cancer? You could be struck with inspiration to bring more joy to your home on Thursday, when domestic-minded Venus creates a conjunction with pleasure-seeking Pluto. If you share a space with roommates or loved ones, you'll be excited to dust off some board games and make your fun as these planets complement each other. If you live alone, you might want to ring up your friends for a virtual night together. You're ready to try out a new way of getting things done on Thursday, as the money-ruling Sun in your 8th house of transformation, mystery, and dramatic change forms a conjunction with routine-ruling Jupiter. Use this optimistic transit to change up your schedule with an eye on saving money, so that you can further other goals on your to-do list. Be extra kind to yourself beginning on Saturday, and get ready to slow down as inner growth-governing Mercury stations retrograde in independent Aquarius. Check in with your spirit, and decide if you need to spend more time in mindfulness as you navigate this transit. Consider what you can do now to reconnect with your hidden self as the messenger planet moves in reverse. LeoJuly 23 to August 22Be careful with how you present yourself to others, Leo. It's crucial to preserve and protect your professional relationships on Tuesday, when the ruling Sun in your 7th house of partnerships, contracts, and business forms a square against passionate Uranus. Keep a cool head if tensions rise, as it's easier for everyone to become more excitable as these heavenly bodies clash. Do your best to see both sides of an argument, and stay flexible. On Thursday, as career-ruling Venus creates a conjunction with domestic-ruling Pluto. If you’re working from home, this transit gives you a chance to revamp your setup and even make the backdrop of your Zoom calls look a little more creative. Get serious about your finances starting on Saturday, as money-minded Mercury stations retrograde in assertive Aquarius. Use this transit to exercise your ability to say "no" and save towards something special. See how you can do more with less as the messenger planet moves in reverse. VirgoAugust 23 to September 22How do you handle unexpected challenges, Virgo? Your patience may be put to the test on Tuesday, when the ego-ruling Sun in your 6th house of health, order, and service forms a square against schedule-savvy Uranus. Before you start your day, begin with a mindfulness practice that helps you to combat stressful situations. Today, you’ll likely encounter people who may not have the same outlook, and you’ll want to be ready to defuse tense situations. Thursday's potential shines brighter, as the Sun in your 6th house forms a conjunction with domestic-ruling Jupiter. It's time to make progress on your task list so that you can fit in more exciting projects. Get ready to reassess your goals starting on Saturday, as career-ruling Mercury stations retrograde in analytical Aquarius. The messenger planet moves in reverse, helping you to be more conservative with your energy. You can do anything, but you can't do everything. LibraSeptember 23 to October 22If you could do anything, what would you do, Libra? You've got the tools to bring your dreams to reality on Thursday, as ruling Venus creates a conjunction with money-minded Pluto. Get started on your financial planning as these planets work together. Career-ruling Moon waxes full in warmhearted Leo on Thursday as well, putting you in the limelight. Don't be afraid to take credit where it's due — but with the Moon creating a square with affection-ruling Mars and opposes communication-ruling Jupiter as well, make sure that you share the love and accept your praise with modesty. On Saturday, inner growth-ruling Mercury stations retrograde in independent Aquarius. This transit brings a magical energy that can supercharge a daily affirmation habit. Don’t have one? Get started: Write up a few affirmations that help you to empower yourself, and observe thankfulness.ScorpioOctober 23 to November 21Tap into your stoic side, Scorpio. On Tuesday, the status-minded Sun in your 4th house of family, instincts, and foundations forms a square against domestic-ruling Uranus. You’ll need to remove emotion from the equation to help manage feelings of confusion. You'll be feeling pretty powerful on Thursday, as passionate Venus creates a conjunction with ruling Pluto. If you've been working to convince someone to see things your way, you may be able to use your influence as these planets complement each other. Thinking about how to attack your long-term goals? You’ll have an opportunity to put the pieces together on Thursday, as the career-ruling Sun in your 4th house forms a conjunction with financial-minded Jupiter. Start spitballing ideas, and predict what will work best for you — with feedback from friends and family.SagittariusNovember 22 to December 21Set aside time to nurture your hidden self, Sagittarius. You may be surprised by the impact a simple change to your schedule can have. Start on Thursday, when routine-ruling Venus creates a conjunction with inner-growth ruling Pluto. Whether it's meditation or a daily tarot card pull, taking the time to reflect on your spiritual side can change your perspective. Voice these new learnings with your loved ones on Thursday, as the Sun in your 3rd house of communication, thought, and community forms a conjunction with ruling Jupiter. This transit's positive energy can help guide you towards creating a regular practice from your newfound habits. Have you tried doing less, Sagittarius? It's okay to slow down your output starting on Saturday, as career-ruling Mercury stations retrograde in analytical Aquarius. See how it feels to concentrate your attention on one task at a time as the messenger planet moves in reverse. Use this transit to get focused and dream up new ways of doing things that make sense with your schedule. CapricornDecember 22 to January 19If you could convince people to support your cause, how would you prepare? It's time to put plans into action on Thursday, as career-ruling Venus creates a conjunction with influential Pluto. Do your homework before you hit the virtual pavement, and schedule a time to discuss potential collaborations as these planets work together. You may feel called towards supporting a humanitarian cause on Thursday, as the Sun in your 2nd house of finances, values, and possessions forms a conjunction with inner growth-ruling Jupiter. Try not to oversell yourself, and stick to what you can commit to during this transit. Learn to reduce your output and take things slowly beginning on Saturday, as routine-ruling Mercury stations retrograde in easy-going Aquarius. See how taking a more relaxed approach to your schedule improves your outlook as the messenger planet moves in reverse.AquariusJanuary 20 to February 18Do you ever feel as though you're fighting against yourself, Aquarius? You could feel a little uncomfortable in your skin on Tuesday, as the love-ruling Sun in your 1st house of self, first impressions, and appearance forms a square against ruling Uranus. The key to finding reconciliation with your inner and outer selves is practicing self-love. Try to forgive yourself for any perceived imperfections and allow yourself to heal. Ground yourself at home on Thursday, and approach work with an optimistic attitude as domestic-minded Venus creates a conjunction with career-governing Pluto. You may find yourself inspired by exciting new thoughts, so make sure to write them down and collaborate with colleagues as you build new projects together. The same day, the routine-ruling Moon waxing full in proud Leo gives you a chance to pat yourself on the back for taking care of yourself. Treat yourself like royalty, and enjoy the fruits of your labor. PiscesFebruary 19 to March 20You're on top of the world, Pisces. On Thursday, your creative-ruling Moon waxes full in enthusiastic Leo, gifting you with a beatific energy. Make sure that you're giving credit where it's due as this full Moon opposes career-ruling Jupiter. It's also essential that your bills are paid as this Moon creates a square against money-ruling Mars. Have you been rethinking your concept of what success looks like? You could have an "ah ha!" moment on Thursday, as the routine-ruling Sun in your 12th house of inner growth, vulnerability, and conclusion forms a conjunction with status-minded Jupiter. Explore your options before you jump ship, and research new opportunities. Be extra kind to yourself starting Saturday, as affection-ruling Mercury stations retrograde in independent Aquarius. You may need more time to process your emotions as the messenger planet moves in reverse. Ask for support from trusted loved ones, and remember that you're not alone. Like what you see? How about some more R29 goodness, right here?Your Money Horoscope For 2021 Is HereWhy Some Astrologers Don’t Believe In Zodiac CuspsHow Black Women Can Win in 2021, Per Astrology

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  • World
    Associated Press

    Mexican leader says Biden offers $4B for Central America

    President Joe Biden's first calls to foreign leaders went to Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador at a strained moment for the U.S. relationship with its North American neighbors. Mexico's president said Saturday that Biden told him the U.S. would send $4 billion to help development in Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala — nations whose hardships have spawned tides of migration through Mexico toward the United States.

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  • Politics
    The Telegraph

    Mary Trump: 'I want people to understand who Uncle Donald really is'

    When Donald Trump was a bratty seven-year-old, his older brother Freddy dumped a bowl of mashed potato on his head during a particularly fractious dinner. The story became a family legend, retold at many a Trump gathering – not so much to tease the man who to many had gone on to become an even bigger brat in adulthood, as to remember and honour Freddy Trump, who died of a heart attack brought on by alcoholism at 42. The night of April 4th 2017 was no different, writes Freddy’s daughter Mary in her bestselling book, Too Much And Never Enough: How My Family Created The World’s Most Dangerous Man. Except that this family supper was the first to take place at the White House, and that boy was now President of the United States. Nevertheless when Mary’s aunt Maryanne brought up the story again, Donald was as furious as ever, listening “with his arms tightly crossed and a scowl on his face.” Even though he had made the highest office in the land, it still “upset him, as if he were that seven-year-old boy,” she says. “It was extraordinary to see what happened to him when that story was told. He clearly still felt the sting.” Ask Mary Trump what her uncle will have felt on Biden’s inauguration day, and the 55-year-old psychologist and author is in no doubt. “As though America was dumping a great pile of mashed potato on his head,” she tells me this on a Zoom call from her New York apartment. As “the only Trump who is willing to tell the world about the kind of man he is” Wednesday, she says, was “a day for me to break out the champagne.” It’s hard to believe they share the same DNA. Engaging and eloquent, Mary Trump is a fantastic interview and an accomplished writer, with an ability to see humour in the darkest of hours. Yet all levity disappears when she tells me how “the damage Donald has done to this country is incalculable. We’re just waiting to find out how much is irreparable.” And having described the horror she felt at sharing a name with the man responsible for that damage in the book, Mary Trump has come to a decision: “I am prepared to change my name if need be”, so worried she is about the connotations it may have in the future.

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  • Lifestyle
    KCRA - Sacramento Videos

    Patient dies in Placer County after receiving COVID-19 vaccine

    A person who received a COVID-19 vaccine died hours after receiving the dose, according to the Placer County Sheriff’s Office. Deputies say the person tested positive in late December and received the vaccine Thursday. The county’s public health department did not administer the vaccine. Officials said several agencies are investigating the cause of death. "There are multiple local, state, and federal agencies actively investigating this case; any reports surrounding the cause of death are premature, pending the outcome of the investigation," the sheriff's office said.

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