• Fake Florida doctor who ‘enhanced’ buttocks with cement, caulking gets 10 years for manslaughter

    From a Florida prison in November 2011, Shatarka Nuby penned a letter to the state’s health department about her cosmetically enhanced buttocks. Her rear end had hardened and turned black, she wrote. Side effects from the years-old injections left the mother of three feeling sick. And she claimed her surgeon - Oneal Ron Morris - was the same faux cosmetic doctor that police had arrested and accused of pumping a near-lethal formula of cement, mineral oil, bathroom caulking and Fix-a-Flat tire sealant into other women’s bodies. Her patients called her “Duchess.” Officials began investigating and interviewed Nuby. But four months later, she was dead. The official cause of death was respiratory failure

  • Red Bull heir enjoys jet-set life 4 years after hit-and-run

    The Ferrari driver who allegedly slammed into a motorcycle cop, dragged him along the road and then sped away from the mangled body took just hours to find, as investigators followed a trail of brake fluid into the gated estate of one of Thailand's richest families. When Vorayuth, 31, has been called in to face authorities, he hasn't shown up, claiming through his attorney that he's sick or out of the country on business. Within weeks of the accident, The Associated Press has found, Vorayuth was back to enjoying his family's jet-set life, largely associated with the Red Bull brand, an energy drink company co-founded by his grandfather.

  • Reheating Rice Can Give You Food Poisoning If You Don't Do This

    Although reheating takeout when you're too busy to cook is one of life's great pleasures, leftover rice can actually be scarily bad for you, the NHS say. Because if you didn't already know, you can get a pretty grim case of food poisoning from eating reheated rice; it's not the reheating that causes the problem, but instead the way the rice has been stored after being cooked the first time. So uncooked rice often contains spores (cells capable of reproducing quickly) of Bacillus cereus - a bacteria strand that can cause food poisoning - that can survive when rice is cooked. And if the rice is left standing at room temperature after it's been boiled, the spores can grow into bacteria, which will

  • The Best Seafood Dives in Connecticut

    Small but mighty, the Connecticut shoreline has always been the home of a string of memorable and authentic seafood joints. You'll see the Nutmeg State in a whole new light when you check out its finest fresh and fried fare.

  • Hoda Kotb Posts Photo of Daughter Haley Joy Meeting Kathie Lee Gifford

    Hoda Kotb Posts Photo of Daughter Haley Joy Meeting Kathie Lee Gifford

  • NASA just captured a photo of Jupiter that you won’t believe is real

    NASA has managed to capture some pretty stunning photos of all the cool stuff they've spotted over the years, and rarely does it fail to amaze. There's images of planet surfaces, the rings of Saturn, and even black holes flying through space totally unchecked . Rarely, however, does a photo look so unreal that at first glance you'd be likely to mistake it for a work of Earthling art. A new photo captured by NASA's Juno spacecraft falls into that category, and oh what a sight it is. The image, originally taken by Juno's "JunoCam" camera, was taken in early February and shows Jupiter's ever-swirling mass of storm clouds from an altitude of roughly 9,000 miles. The storms which continually rock the planet take on a milky appearance when captured up close, and a citizen scientist named Roman Tkachenko took the liberty of enhancing the photo's colors to bring out even more of the defining lines and edges. The Juno craft, packed with all kinds of fancy monitoring equipment, made its fifth flyby of the planet on Monday, which is also the fourth "science orbit," which is the name they give the flybys when all the instruments on board are up and running. The craft's next flyby won't happen until late May 2017, so it's a rare and exciting event when one of these close passes goes by without a hitch. The craft's data is currently being sent to Earth where researchers will continue to mine it for precious information about our solar system's most intimidating planet.