• Duchess of Sussex 'is struggling to cope and not answering my calls' says father

    Thomas Markle has said his daughter Meghan is struggling to cope with the burdens of royalty, and refuses to take his calls. He said he is worried the Duchess of Sussex is hiding the pressure of her new life behind a “pained” smile as she adjusts to her “prim” duties as wife of the fifth-in-line to the Throne. But he revealed she has not been in touch since a phone call after the Royal Wedding while he was recovering from the heart operation which caused him to miss her big day. He told the Sun on Sunday: “My thing about my daughter right now is that I think she is terrified. “I see it in her eyes, I see it in her face and I see it in her smile. I’ve seen her smile for years. I know her smile. I don’t like the one I’m seeing now.” Thomas Markle, pictured here on Good Morning Britain in June, said his daughter had stopped taking his calls Credit: REUTERS/REUTERS He said that while her expression might be due to a “bad couple of days” it worried him, and led him to conclude she was under “too much pressure”. Adding that he could “die soon”, he said he wishes they would reconcile so he could tell her how proud he was - but she no longer answers her phone to him and staff at Kensington Palace will not return his texts. Mr Markle said: “I had a heart attack, doesn’t anybody care? I could actually die soon. Does she want this to be the last thing we’ve said to each other?” He said they pair had never gone so long without speaking, and that he wanted to clear the air and tell her how proud he is. Speaking from his seaside home in Rosarito in Mexico, the retired lighting director, 73, also offered an apology, saying: “If I had one message for her it would be that I’m sorry for anything that went wrong. I’d like to put our differences behind us and get together. I miss you very much.” Watch: Meet the Markles In early May Thomas Markle caused headlines around the world when it emerged he had colluded with a photographer to sell staged ‘paparazzi’ shots of his wedding preparations. After the scandal broke, Meghan is understood to have forgiven her father and his invitation to the Windsor ceremony was not withdrawn. But he developed chest pains on the day he was due to be driven to the airport and went instead to Sharp Chula Vista Medical Center, ten miles over the US border,  where surgeons installed stents to open his clogged arteries. Meghan's father watched the ceremony from his hospital bed Credit: Dominic Lipinski/PA After watching the Prince of Wales walk his daughter down the aisle on television from his California hospital bed, he texted Meghan to tell her she looked beautiful. They discussed the wedding and he wished the couple a happy honeymoon. “That was the last call,” he told the newspaper. "The phone number I had been calling Meghan on is no longer picking up, and I don’t have an address for her. "I can send something to the palace, but there is no guarantee it would get to her. “I sent a text to my palace contact saying I would like to reach my daughter and got no reply.” Markle, who was reported paid £7,500 for a tell-all June interview with Good Morning Britain, said he wanted a father-daughter relationship, adding: “I took care of my mother the last five years of her life. "My daughter said to me she would take care of me in my declining years. I’m not talking about money - I’m talking about taking care of me.” On Saturday the Duchess of Sussex drew admiring glances at Wimbledon when she watched the ladies; singles final from the Royal Box with her sister-in-law, the Duchess of Cambridge.

  • Report: Trump ‘Snubbed’ by Prince Charles and Prince William

    Prince William and Prince Charles both declined to meet with President Trump during his visit to the UK last week, according to The Sunday Times of London. Their apparent reluctance left Queen Elizabeth II as the lone member of the royal family to meet

  • Fitness experts agree that sit-ups are worthless - here are 9 moves they recommend instead

    From celebrity trainers working in the trendiest Manhattan gyms to the National Institute for Fitness and Sport in Indianapolis and US Army training exams, sit-ups are getting a bad reputation. Scientists have discovered that the moves, once a staple of basic workout routines, don't reduce waistline circumference or trim middle belly fat. Sit-ups are also not the best way to strengthen your core, and keep it flexible and strong for the long run. Earlier this week, the US Army announced that after decades of two-minute sit-up requirements, they're phasing out that portion of their fitness test by the end of 2020. Instead, the Army says it'll make room for some fitness tasks that are more useful

  • Thai cave boys mourn death of Navy Seal as British divers reveal authorities were out of their depth

    The 12 boys rescued from a Thai cave were moved to tears as they paid tribute to the former Navy Seal who died ahead of their dramatic rescue. The "Wild Boars" football team, who are recovering in hospital following 18 days spent inside the Tham Luang cave, wrote messages of thanks on a picture of Saman Kunan after they were told of the diver’s death for the first time since they emerged from their ordeal. Images of the children in their hospital gowns with their heads bowed low were released on Sunday as British divers involved in the international rescue mission claimed the Thai Navy were “out of their depth” before their crucial intervention. Doctors at the Chiang Rai Prachanukroh Hospital where the boys, aged 11 to 16, are being treated said on Sunday that they were in good health and are expected to be discharged on Thursday. The health ministry said the overall condition for the players and coach was "normal", though many are still on a course of antibiotics after spending nine days in the damp and dark trapped underground. Images of the children in their hospital gowns with their heads bowed low were released on Sunday  Credit:  AFP But experts have urged caution amid the global intrigue surrounding the boys' stories, saying they would all need to be monitored closely for signs of psychological distress that could take months to manifest and could be triggered by probing media interviews. Medics said the boys were only considered mentally strong enough on Saturday to hear the news of Mr Kunan. When told how Mr Kunan died while installing oxygen tanks along the twisting passageways of the cave many of the boys cried before penning tributes on a drawing of the diver. "All cried and expressed their condolences by writing messages on a drawing of Lieutenant Commander Saman and observed one minute of silence for him," Jedsada Chokdamrongsuk, permanent secretary at the health ministry, said in the statement on Sunday. "They also thanked him and promised to be good boys." Attention had shifted away from the boys’ recovery in recent days to the team of British divers who discovered the missing football team and then helped lead an international rescue effort. The divers were hailed heroes on their return to Britain, with more details emerging of the mission to extract the boys through murky waters and through narrow underwater passageways. Reflecting on the mission, Jason Mallinson, 50, a father-of-one from Huddersfield, said the death of Mr Kunan was the wake up call to the Thai Navy that illuminated how crucial the British crew’s expertise would be. Chris Jewell, a British diver who travelled to Thailand to help, gave credit to the “brave” children who “showed no signs of panic” Credit:  HENRY NICHOLLS/REUTERS “They realised they were way out of their depth and they had been lucky to get those guys into that last chamber with the boys and we were the only people who could remedy the situation,” he told the Mail on Sunday. Mr Mallinson described how he was called to action by an emergency text message from the British Cave Rescue Council while at work in Scunthorpe and flew out to Thailand to help immediately. Chris Jewell, another British diver who travelled to Thailand with Mr Mallinson to help, gave credit to the “brave” children who “showed no signs of panic” as he gently pushed them under the surface of the water in the cave system and guided them through the dark to safety. He also described how he become lost in the dark underwater for four minutes while carrying a child to safety before finally finding the guideline and surfacing to complete the rescue.  The boys were expected to watch a recording of the World Cup final on Monday morning after doctors ruled out allowing them to stay up late to view the match live on Sunday night. "Given that the final will be broadcast quite late our time, and we want the boys to rest and not to be looking at screens too much, we will probably record the final and show it to them later," said the official the Chiang Rai Prachanukroh Hospital. The world football governing body FIFA had invited the boys and their coach to attend the final in Moscow but they can not go for medical reasons. Last week, Manchester United invited the "Wild Boars" to watch a match at their Old Trafford ground. About 4,000 volunteers were on Sunday taking part in a clean-up of the area around the Tham Luang cave. A park area around the mouth got trampled by the hundreds of rescuers, and media workers, who flocked to help with the mission and to report on it.

  • Northern California woman’s multiple arrests exemplify Proposition 47, 57 issues

    For at least the third time since July 2017, 69-year-old Nancy Lee Burks of Eureka was arrested on the morning of July 6 at her Maple Lane residence on suspicion of narcotics activity and less than three and a half hours later she was released from Humboldt County jail, according to courthouse records and three Humboldt County Sheriffs’ Office news releases on each arrest. Sgt. Jesse Taylor of the Humboldt County Drug Task Force - a team consisting of local law enforcement agency personnel who are overseen, but not run by, the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office - said Burks is by no means the most egregious offender, biggest trafficker nor the only repeat offender the task force deals with, but she does locally exemplify some issues with some state laws.

  • FDA recalls heart meds used to treat high blood pressure over cancer concerns

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a voluntary recall of several medications that contain the active ingredient valsartan, which is used to treat high blood pressure and heart failure. “This recall is due to an impurity, N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), which was found in the recalled products, the FDA said in a statement Saturday. “However, not all products containing valsartan are being recalled.” Officials say NDMA is classified as a probable human carcinogen -a substance that could cause cancer. They said those findings are based on results from recent laboratory tests. The administration said the carcinogen’s presence is “thought to be related to changes in the way the active

  • We visited a cult-favorite Texas taco chain that's trying to take over America. Here's why Chipotle should be terrified.

    We believe tacos are our future. For too long, the burrito has ruled supreme over the world of Tex-Mex, at least since Chipotle's tentacles spread across the United States with the promise of a mainstream Mission-style burrito. But now, the burrito's reign is coming to an end- if Torchy's Tacos has anything to say about it. The taco chain started in a trailer in Austin, Texas, in 2006. Since then, it has grown a cult following in Texas and expanded to more than 50 locations. To topple Big Burrito, however, it's going to take more than some Texan pride. Torchy's needs to back its heady expansion goals with food that lives up to its enviable reputation.