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  • Health
    The Week

    Cancer drug is 27.5 times more effective at treating COVID-19 than remdesivir, study suggests

    Researchers reported Monday in the journal Science that a drug developed to fight multiple myeloma has proved 27.5 times more effective at treating COVID-19 than remdesivir in laboratory studies with infected human lung and kidney cells. The drug, Aplidin or Plitidepsin, was also effective at fighting COVID-19 in lab mice. Aplidin was developed in Spain from a tubular, plantlike marine animal called a sea squirt. It has gone through a Phase II trial against COVID-19 and is awaiting a Phase III trial. Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, started exploring Aplidin's use as a treatment for COVID-19 in March. Instead of looking through databases of existing drugs to find one that targeted the virus, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports, the UC San Francisco team sought out drugs that would protect key human proteins from being hijacked by the coronavirus. Experts not involved in the study said the research was promising but needed confirmation in human trials. Effective treatments will be crucial for keeping down the death toll as new, more contagious variants of the coronavirus emerge and spread. The approved COVID-19 vaccines appear slightly less effective against the new strains, and scientists have yet to show that vaccinated people stop transmitting the coronavirus. A second study, not yet published or peer-reviewed, suggests that Aplidin is equally effective against one of the new strains that had spread throughout Britain. "Work on treatments has been ongoing since the outbreak began and we have seen the benefits," Chris Beyrer, professor of public health at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, told the Journal Sentinel. "Survival is actually better than it was in March, April, May." More stories from theweek.comMitch McConnell is the GOATWho is the Cinderella in the GameStop fairy tale?The left's fake Senate majority

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  • U.S.
    Axios

    Silicon Valley backlash grows as vocal tech faction boycotts

    Silicon Valley may be a "state of mind," but it's also very much a real enclave in Northern California. Now, a growing faction of the tech industry is boycotting it. Why it matters: The Bay Area is facing for the first time the prospect of losing its crown as the top destination for tech workers and startups — which could have an economic impact on the region and force it to reckon with its local issues. Get smarter, faster with the news CEOs, entrepreneurs and top politicians read. Sign up for Axios Newsletters here.While the pandemic’s arrival sent tech workers to toil from home just as the Bay Area’s housing crisis and mounting quality of life problems bubbled over, some are taking the opportunity to move to cities that better suit their lifestyles. * As many as an estimated 89,000 households have left San Francisco. * "The majority of people I've spoken with ... are doing it not because of COVID-19 directly but because of the resulting degradation of public safety," says venture capitalist and former San Francisco mayor Mark Farrell. * City Hall’s tech relationship has also drastically changed. While then-mayor Ed Lee brokered a payroll tax break for Twitter and others in 2011 to keep their jobs in the city, today that move is deeply despised by officials who don’t believe the industry is paying its fair share. Recently a small-but-vocal group of investors, workers, and entrepreneurs like Keith Rabois and Joe Lonsdale have been loudly advertising their exits from the Bay Area and other high-priced cities like New York, and encouraging others to follow suit. * Miami and Austin are being praised as the new tech hotspots. While it hasn't caused a bump in startup funding in those cities, according to Pitchbook data, investors from influential firms like Founders Fund and Andreessen Horowitz have set up shop there. * And those cities are not missing the opportunity. Miami Mayor Francis Suarez has been waving his city’s flag on Twitter to court potential residents. * Austin Mayor Steve Adler touted his city’s growth and passage of a $7 billion package for transformational transportation during a recent conversation with Suarez and San Francisco Mayor London Breed. Between the lines: Those who never wanted to live in San Francisco (or the greater Bay Area) are finally getting the permission not to. The debate is equally (and perhaps even more) a referendum on the state of California. * “If California decides to up their income tax a bit more, people are going to start flying like crazy,” says Drive Capital managing partner Mark Kvamme, a Silicon Valley native who set up shop in Ohio nearly a decade ago. * The tech industry also took the passage of AB5, a law that imposed stricter requirements for classifying workers as contractors, as yet another attack on business and tech companies like Uber and DoorDash. * Further, some have been unhappy with the state restrictions during the pandemic and its slow roll-out of COVID-19 vaccines. As of this week, California is lagging behind nearly all states in vaccinations. * Some prominent VCs are even taking part in an effort to recall Calif. Gov. Gavin Newson. * Nevertheless, Austin has already shown it's willing to push back on tech, as evidenced by its year-long showdown with Uber and Lyft over fingerprinting. Miami is also likely to get scrutiny over how it ensures that its diverse communities do not get trampled over. Yes, but: “What I take issue with is our leaders — people of means — abandoning our community when it needs us most," Twilio CEO Jeff Lawson recently tweeted. "Reaping the benefits of Silicon Valley’s talent, tech incubators, mentors, professional network and culture until they no longer need it.”The bottom line: The region’s grip on the industry will likely loosen as a myriad of other cities’ local ecosystems continue to grow into their own and provide more options for those who want to work in technology. Support safe, smart, sane journalism. Sign up for Axios Newsletters here.

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  • Entertainment
    Dr. Phil CBS

    ‘If He Makes My Daughter Cry – I’m Coming For Him,’ Says Mom About Daughter’s 62-Year-Old Boyfriend

    Bill, a 62-year-old wealthy real estate developer, and Bri, a 23-year-old former restaurant hostess, claim that, despite their different backgrounds and almost 40-year age difference, they have great communication and a “healthy relationship.” The couple, who have been together for four years and are currently featured on the Lifetime television series Marrying Millions, admit that not everyone in their extended families wants to see them together. “Bill and I put up with each other, but I’m just more outspoken, and he’s more fake,” says Bri’s mother, Sharon. “I’ve already given him fair warning. If he makes my daughter cry – I’m coming for him.” When Bill tells Sharon that he would never want to hurt Bri and says he’s “satisfied” with their relationship, how does Bri respond? Watch more from Tuesday’s Dr. Phil here. Dr. Phil airs Monday-Friday. Check here for your local listing. The new season of Marrying Millions premieres Wednesday, January 27, 2021. WATCH: ‘I Don’t Want Her To Get Hurt,’ Says Woman About Her Ex-Husband’s New Girlfriend TELL DR. PHIL YOUR STORY: Have an outrageous story that will shock Dr. Phil?

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