• Politics
    The Telegraph

    Behind the scenes of the Trump circus: what three years reporting from Washington taught me

    The first thing you notice about Donald Trump in the flesh is his size. He has a rugby player build: 6ft 3in and 17 stone. His sheer physicality is never quite captured on television. Neatly cut suits hide his bulk from the camera, but in person - especially side-on - it is unavoidable. The second thing is the hair, swept across and back and fixed in place. It is like a crashing wave frozen in motion. And then there is the skin complexion. A warm, yellow hue that draws your eyes after all the speculation about sunbed use. At least, that is the order I remember when seeing him first after moving to Washington DC as The Telegraph’s US Editor in October 2017. After years covering Westminster, I had been sent to try to unpack the Trump phenomenon to British readers, the nature of his appeal and how he was wielding power. For the next three years and four months my working life revolved almost entirely around the president - his moods, his decisions, his controversies, his tweets. There were rallies across America, where he was welcomed like a saviour. There were foreign trips to Hanoi, Singapore, Brussels, Helsinki and London, where he was treated with caution. Most of the time you simply felt swept along by an unrelenting current of news, much of it directed by Mr Trump himself, a master media manipulator.

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  • U.S.
    ABC News

    Capitol rioter who allegedly tweeted he wanted to 'assassinate' Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez faces 5 charges

    A man who allegedly made an online threat to "assassinate" Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., faces five charges in connection with the U.S. Capitol insurrection, authorities said. Garret Miller was arrested Wednesday in Texas. Newly released court documents chronicle a series of social media posts Miller allegedly made on Jan. 6 and in the days following the riot, including threats to the Democratic lawmaker, a regular target of conservatives, and a U.S. Capitol Police officer.

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  • Politics
    HuffPost

    Rep. Madison Cawthorn, Totally Shredded On CNN, Admits He Has Nothing On Vote 'Fraud'

    “I think I would say the election was not fraudulent," he finally confessed after getting schooled by Pamela Brown.

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  • U.S.
    Axios

    Biden wants to cancel $10k per person of student loan debt. But it won't address the root issue

    Data: New York Fed Consumer Credit Panel/Equifax; Chart: Axios VisualsThere’s a growing consensus among Americans who want President Biden to cancel student debt — but addressing the ballooning debt burden is much more complicated than it seems.Why it matters: Student debt is stopping millions of Americans from buying homes, buying cars and starting families. And the crisis is rapidly getting worse.Support safe, smart, sane journalism. Sign up for Axios Newsletters here.By the numbers: Student debt — which stands at $1.55 trillion — is the biggest category of debt Americans owe, aside from mortgages. * Most borrowers are white, but Black college graduates owe an average of $25,000 more than their white counterparts. * According to a new Harris Poll survey, 64% of Americans support canceling some student debt, and 55% support canceling all of it.What's happening: Biden has proposed immediately cancelling $10,000 of federal student loan debt for every borrower. The move would cost around $370 billion. * That would eliminate debt for the 15 million borrowers that owe $10,000 or less — a broad-based approach that would help all 42 million borrowers.Yes, but: Here's what that alone wouldn't do: * It wouldn't make much of a difference for the nearly 30 million borrowers who owe more than $10,000. Many of them went to graduate school and owe hundreds of thousands. * It wouldn't stimulate the economy. Student debt stops many from investing or buying property, which is a drag on the economy, but canceling a small amount of debt wouldn't change that, experts say. * It wouldn’t target the most vulnerable borrowers. Canceling the same amount of debt for all doesn’t account for the fact that many Americans with student debt are also among the most well-educated and high-earning individuals. * It wouldn't help future borrowers. “The problem with forgiving student debt is that every day we’re making new loans in this broken system,” says Adam Looney, an economist at the University of Utah. “You’ve not solved the problem.”Insurmountable student debt is a recent phenomenon, Looney says. It's been growing at six times the rate of the U.S. economy, and it's only getting worse. * There are no limits on how much students can borrow and few restrictions on how they spend the money. * And, on top of that, the cost of college and graduate school is skyrocketing. As a result, young people are borrowing sums of money they can’t possibly repay and many are using that money to pursue degrees at online or for-profit colleges with higher than average dropout rates.What we're watching: Among the American public, canceling debt isn't a fringe or far-left idea any more. * In the Harris Poll survey, 78% support putting restrictions on the price of a university education. And 59% support no tuition at public universities.Be smart: sign up FREE for the most influential newsletter in America.

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  • Lifestyle
    In The Know

    Disney World fans are divided over the park’s ‘disgusting’ new food item: ‘Does not sound appetizing’

    Disney World fans, many of whom are very willing to voice their opinions on the park’s latest foods, had plenty to say.

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