• Entertainment
    The Guardian

    'Impossible to comprehend': Stephen King on horrors of Trump and coronavirus

    Years after his pandemic novel, bestselling author tells CNN he is mystified that US was not better preparedIt has been four decades since Stephen King wrote The Stand, his acclaimed novel about a deadly influenza pandemic wiping out most of human civilization.So the bestselling contemporary horror novelist has difficulty understanding why authorities did not see the coronavirus crisis coming, or take the necessary precautionary steps.“Just in the last three or four weeks people are saying to me, ‘We are living in a Stephen King world,’ and boy, all I can say is I wish we weren’t,” King, who has sold an estimated 350m books worldwide, told CNN.“This has been waiting in the wings for a long, long time. I wrote The Stand about a pandemic that wipes out most of the human race, and thank God this one isn’t that bad, but I wrote that in 1979 and ever since then this has just been waiting to happen.“The fact that nobody really seemed prepared still mystifies me.”King has been outspoken in his criticism of Donald Trump’s reaction to the crisis. On Sunday he added Ron DeSantis, the Republican Florida governor, to his list of leaders he believes have underperformed. DeSantis has been under fire for not enacting a statewide shelter-in-place order and for allowing beaches to remain open, placing hordes of spring breakers at risk of infection.“It’s almost impossible to comprehend,” King said. “I remember back in the 70s when Republicans laughed at Jimmy Carter as being indecisive and wishy-washy.“The president we have now, and Ron DeSantis here in Florida, these are supposed to be go-to-it guys, the guy you want in charge when something really goes wrong because they don’t waffle, they don’t wishy-washy.”King, who has homes in Maine and Florida, continued: “You had Trump at first saying, ‘This isn’t really very serious, don’t worry, everything’s going to be OK,’ then when the stock market starts to die, when the reality of the thing hits home, he’s talking about, ‘Well, take it easy. This thing is going to be like a miracle, everything’s going to be OK by Easter and we’ll have the churches full.’“And then a couple of days later he talks about a quarantine. [New York governor] Andrew Cuomo didn’t know about it, nobody really seemed to know, it just came out of his head.”DeSantis, a fervent supporter of the president, is following suit, King believes: “I’m not sure he’s ahead of the curve, I think he’s somewhere behind it. This whole situation is a little bit like the barn door has been locked but the horse was stolen, I’m going to say, 10 days ago.”The author did have some good news for fans. Publication of his next book, If It Bleeds, has been brought forward two weeks to 28 April, to entertain self-isolating readers sooner.King noted that the new publication date would be the same as his fellow bestselling author John Grisham’s new novel, Camino Winds.“I want to talk to the publisher about maybe doing a two-for-one,” he said. “Wouldn’t that be cool, a double feature?”

  • Celebrity
    Yahoo Lifestyle

    Elizabeth Hurley shares sexy photo while in 'lockdown' with family: 'Finally washed my hair, put on some makeup'

    The 54-year-old told fans she's quarantining in the countryside with family members and friends, some of whom are high-risk.

  • World
    Yahoo News UK

    Coronavirus: Police left in 'absolute shock' after finding 25 adults and children at karaoke party despite lockdown

    Derbyshire Police said its officers were left shocked after finding the gathering of 25 adults in children in Normanton, Derby, on Saturday night.

  • Celebrity
    INSIDER

    A New York nurse shared a chilling photo of coronavirus victims to show 'the ghastly reality of what' medical workers deal with on frontlines

    The harrowing image shows the bodies of deceased COVID-19 patients being stored in a refrigerated truck outside the ambulance bay.

  • U.S.
    USA TODAY

    Coronavirus lockdown happened while my new boyfriend was visiting; now he can't leave

    Now that the coronavirus has locked down Madrid, my new boyfriend and I are stuck together in a borrowed apartment in a city neither of us calls home.

  • Entertainment
    Scary Mommy

    Actors Are Feuding Over Who Should Get To Play ‘Tiger King’ Joe Exotic

    Hollywood actors, including Edward Norton and Dax Shepard, are social media feuding over who should get to play “Tiger King” Joe Exotic In the midst of the world’s most devastating health pandemic, Americans have found a new entertainment obsession thanks to Netflix. Tiger King: Murder, Mayhem, and Madness, which is currently the number one program []

  • Business
    Bloomberg

    JPMorgan Says the Market Rout Is Probably Past Its Worst Now

    (Bloomberg) -- Strategists at JPMorgan Chase & Co. have concluded that most risk assets -- a universe that typically includes stocks and credit -- have seen their low points for the recession that’s gripped economies around the world.Conditions that JPMorgan had set for market stabilization and revival have largely been met, with recession-like pricing, a reversal in investor positioning and extraordinary fiscal stimulus, strategists led by John Normand wrote in a note Friday. Coronavirus infection rates remain a “wild card,” as they remain high even if they’re “slowing” in the U.S. and Europe.“Risky markets should remain volatile as long as infection rates create uncertainty about the depth and duration of the Covid recession, but enough has changed fundamentally and technically to justify adding risk selectively,” Normand wrote. “Most risky markets have probably made their lows for this recession, except perhaps oil and some EM currencies beset by debt-sustainability issues.”Most risk assets should trade higher in the second quarter of the year, Normand said. He recommends that investors average into oversold markets, particularly those where central banks are buying directly.“The optimal time to re-enter cheap markets is either one quarter before the growth slump fades, for those who have high confidence in their business-cycle forecasts; or when valuations reach two-sigma extremes, for those who are agnostic on fundamental catalysts,” Normand said. “Either top-down framework implies starting to re-enter markets now.”Not everyone sees the bottom as necessarily in.Goldman Sachs Group Inc.’s David Kostin reiterated in a note Friday that he expects the market to turn lower in coming weeks. He cited a checklist for a sustained rally similar to Normand’s -- of slowing viral spread, evidence that fiscal and monetary policy stimulus is working, and a bottoming in investor positioning and flows.Portfolio AdjustmentsNormand said his approach dovetails with the recommendations in the past week from bottom-up analysts at JPMorgan to add exposure in U.S. and European credit, peripheral European sovereigns, and U.S. and European inflation breakevens.On the stocks side, things are somewhat more nuanced. JPMorgan has been overweight equities all year in its multi-asset portfolio, though partially hedged with short positions in credit and long ones in the U.S. dollar.“Thus, future adjustments would be in terms of magnitude and funding source rather than in overall tilt,” Normand said. He added that “our global equity strategists believe that the risk-reward for equities remains skewed to the downside” because relief rallies will be faded.Normand cautions that not all apparently cheap markets should be bought, as there is still a risk-reward spectrum. Developed-market bonds should be used to fund allocations to cheap credit and equities, but bond sell-offs should also be used as opportunities to buy duration as insurance against the next shock. Credit generally has higher risk-adjusted returns than equities, so in volatility-adjusted terms may be superior in the market bottoming process over the coming weeks, he said.Emerging-market stocks and bonds warrant some exposure, Normand said. Even if their countries’ fundamentals might not improve relative to those of developed nations, there’s potential for a “significant and broad decline” in the U.S. dollar amid the U.S.’s twin fiscal and current-account deficits, which would benefit assets in developing countries.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.