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  • U.S.
    The Telegraph

    ‘I need to protect myself in case there is a civil war’: Why middle-class America is arming up

    Brad Vercosa has passed Jimmy’s Sport Shop in Mineola, Long Island countless times, but last Thursday he approached the counter, still in his slippers, to buy his first gun. The construction company owner is one of nearly five million Americans who have purchased their first firearm over the past 12 months, driving what analysts are calling the greatest gun-buying spree in the country’s history. The seeds were sown with the onset of the pandemic last spring, and grew in response to Black Lives Matter demonstrations and pro-Trump rallies over the summer. But for many of Jimmy Gong’s customers in Mineola – a suburban village 20 miles east of the skyscrapers of Manhattan – the storming of the Capitol by pro-Trump demonstrators on January 6 was the inflection point. The following day is one of the busiest Gong, 46, can remember, even accounting for a 150 per cent rise in demand. And he expects business to keep booming. After Donald Trump’s impeachment on Wednesday, the FBI warned of possible armed protests and “domestic terrorism”, amid reports of armed far-Right groups planning to gather at all 50 state capitals and in Washington DC in the run-up to Joe Biden being sworn in as president.

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  • U.S.
    Associated Press

    House arrest plan for invader of Pelosi's office halted

    A federal judge in Washington on Friday night halted a plan to release and put on house arrest the Arkansas man photographed sitting at a desk in House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's office during last week's riot at the U.S. Capitol. Richard Barnett will instead be brought to Washington, D.C., immediately for proceedings in his case, Chief U.S. District Judge Beryl Howell ordered Friday night, staying a decision by another judge to confine Barnett to his home in Gravette, Arkansas, until his trial. Howell's ruling came hours after U.S. Magistrate Judge Erin Wiedemann in Arkansas set a $5,000 bond for Barnett and ordered that a GPS monitor track his location.

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  • Health
    Eat This, Not That!

    First Signs You Have COVID, According to Doctors

    You're hot, you feel a cough brewing, your eye feels wonky—and, oh no, is this COVID-19? Is this the first sign you have coronavirus? "The bottom line is that only COVID test—or an antibody test—can confirm you have or had a case, but since even those aren't 100%, read on for other clues," says Dr. Leo Nissola. Here are 13 early signs that you might have COVID-19, informed by the CDC and the most recent studies; if you experience them, contact a medical professional to get tested. And to ensure your health and the health of others, don't miss these Sure Signs You've Already Had Coronavirus. 1 You Have Flu-Like Symptoms "For most people, the coronavirus will be like any other flu or cold. Many people catch these illnesses during their lives and experience only mild symptoms," says Dr. Carrie Lam. For a certain amount of people: "There are no special signs or symptoms of coronavirus. In fact, that is one of the reasons why it spread so quickly," says Dr. Kaushal M. Kulkarni, a board-certified ophthalmologist. 2 You Have a Loss of Senses "Thirty percent of patients have loss of smell (anosmia) and loss of taste (ageusia) as their first signs of a COVID-19 infection," says Dr. Jonathan Kaplan. "Because of the relationship between smell and taste, taste can also be significantly affected. It can take weeks to recover," says Dr. Inna Husain. Since this loss of sense is so unusual, there's a good chance it's COVID-related if it happens to you. 3 You Have a Fever "Coronavirus often begins with a fever of 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit within 2-14 days of exposure to an infected person," says Dr. LaFarra Young, a pediatric pathologist and health coach. One study found this is usually the first sign you have coronavirus, following by, in order, cough, muscle pain, nausea or vomiting and diarrhea.RELATED: 7 Tips You Must Follow to Avoid COVID, Say Doctors 4 You Have a Dry Cough One of the most common symptoms is a dry cough, which can be described as one without mucus or phlegm. "If you notice a slight cough or fever this would be reason enough to begin self-isolation allowing a couple of days to see if symptoms manifest," says Dr. Giuseppe Aragona, a family medicine doctor. "It has been reported that the respiratory symptoms will worsen after a week, though in some cases the incubation period can be as little as two days.""The cough to look out for is a new, continuous cough," reports the BBC. "This means coughing a lot for more than an hour, or having three or more coughing episodes in 24 hours. If you usually have a cough, it may be worse than usual." 5 You Have a Sore Throat or Headache Nearly 14% of cases studied in China had symptoms of headache and a sore throat, reports WHO. The virus "travels to the back of your nasal passages and to the mucous membranes in the back of your throat," reports Johns Hopkins. "That's the place where symptoms—such as a sore throat and dry cough—often start."RELATED: Dr. Fauci Just Said When We'd Be Back to "Normal" 6 You Have Chills or Body Aches CNN news anchor Chris Cuomo says he was shivering so much due to COVID-19 that he "chipped a tooth." "They call them the rigors," he said, adding that he felt like he was being beaten by "a piñata."Researchers at New York University also discovered aching muscles (known as myalgia) are among the factors that could signal respiratory distress caused by the coronavirus. 7 You Are Fatigued "Some older or immunosuppressed individuals may not present with a fever, instead presenting with other common symptoms such as sore throat, dry cough, or fatigue," says Dr. LaFarra Young, a pathologist at King's Daughters Medical Center. "Fatigue is a daily lack of energy; unusual or excessive whole-body tiredness not relieved by sleep," reports WebMD. "Fatigue can prevent a person from functioning normally and affects a person's quality of life." 8 You Experience Shortness of Breath Can't get enough air in your lungs? "Extreme shortness of breath and respiratory issues are what is causing the increase in patients in the ICU. Increasing your immune system using Vitamin D can help decrease the likeliness of the spread of bacterial and viral infections," says Dr. Geoffrey Mount Varner.If you are struggling for air and can't breathe, seek immediate medical attention. 9 You Have Pain in Your Chest "Persistent pain or pressure in the chest" is one of the CDC's "emergency warning signs"—seek medical help immediately if you feel it. This could be a symptom of the coronavirus or a heart issue, and tests can help determine the right course of action.RELATED: Simple Ways to Avoid a Heart Attack, According to Doctors 10 You Have Pink Eye "Conjunctivitis, or more commonly known as pink eye, can present as a symptom of coronavirus," says Dr. Kevin Lee. "People should be cognizant of possible aerosol transmission with the conjunctiva and through ocular secretions, like tears." 11 You Have Diarrhea or Vomiting Diarrhea, vomiting, and stomach pain may be more common as a symptom of COVID-19 than anticipated, according to The American Journal of Gastroenterology. Half the patients that were diagnosed complained of those issues in the study. Some patients may not even have respiratory symptoms, and just digestive ones.RELATED: The New COVID Symptom Every Woman Needs to Know 12 You Have a Bluish Face or Lips This is considered one of the CDC's "emergency warning signs" and they advise you "get medical attention immediately" if you see them. Cyanosis is the name for poor oxygen circulation in the blood that causes bluish discoloration of the skin. 13 You Feel Confused Doctors have observed neurological symptoms, including confusion, stroke and seizures, in a subset of COVID-19 patients. If you are considered high risk, you may show rarer and more severe symptoms. The CDC considers "new confusion or inability to arouse" as an emergency warning sign. Do seek medical attention immediately if it sets in.If you or someone you know is experiencing any of these symptoms, call your medical care provider before showing up. And to get through this pandemic at your healthiest, don't miss these 35 Places You're Most Likely to Catch Coronavirus.

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  • Politics
    The Week

    Trump reportedly began 'choreographing' premature victory speech weeks before election

    President Trump is known for going off script, but his premature presidential election victory declaration in the early hours of the morning on Nov. 4 wasn't a completely spur-of-the-moment decision, Axios' Jonathan Swan reports.In the first installment of a reported series on Trump's final two months in office, Swan writes that Trump began "choreographing election night in earnest" during the second week of October following a "toxic" debate with President-elect Joe Biden on Sept. 29 and a bout with COVID-19 that led to his hospitalization. At that point, Trump's internal poll numbers had reportedly taken a tumble, Swan notes.With that in mind, he reportedly called his first White House chief of staff, a stunned Reince Priebus, and "acted out his script, including walking up to a podium and prematurely declaring victory on election night if it looked like he was ahead." Indeed, in the lead up to Election Day, Trump reportedly kept his focus on the so-called "red mirage," the early vote counts that would show many swing states leaning red because mail-in ballots had yet to be counted. Trump, Swan reports, intended to "weaponize it for his vast base of followers," who would go to bed thinking he had secured a second-term, likely planting the seeds of a stolen election. Read more at Axios. > As I've been writing, the plan was to steal the election all along. Fantastic reporting here. https://t.co/k8C73o8vH7> > -- Jonah Goldberg (@JonahDispatch) January 16, 2021More stories from theweek.com 5 more scathing cartoons about Trump's 2nd impeachment Trump's vaccine delay is getting suspicious Biden's inaugural address expected to push unity, optimism

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