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  • Health
    Best Life

    These 2 Everyday Items Can Kill COVID in 2 Minutes, New Study Says

    It's safe to say that the arrival of the novel coronavirus has made us more aware of cleanliness and overall hygiene in our daily lives. In fact, it's made us so aware that we're continuously buying up the go-to cleaning products we rely on, making them hard to find even seven months into the pandemic. Fortunately, it turns out there are more everyday products around your house that can effectively kill the coronavirus. New research out of Penn State found that antiseptic mouthwash and baby shampoo can rid you of the virus in under two minutes. Read on to find out more, and to see if you should pay extra attention to virus killers, check out How Bad the COVID Outbreak Is in Your State.The new research from the Penn State College of Medicine, which was published in the Journal of Medical Virology, tested various household products to see if they could have any effect on "deactivating" the coronavirus, including a neti pot, peroxide sore-mouth cleansers, mouthwashes, and a 1% solution of baby shampoo. While the former two proved to be no match for COVID, the results showed that the baby shampoo solution—which is often used by head and neck doctors to rinse out sinuses—killed 99.9 percent of coronaviruses within two minutes of contact time, while mouthwash did the same in just 30 seconds.The researchers say that the discovery could be particularly helpful in slowing the spread of the virus while the public awaits the release of an effective vaccine. "People who test positive for COVID-19 and return home to quarantine may possibly transmit the virus to those they live with," Craig Meyers, PhD, a professor of microbiology and immunology and a researcher at Penn State Cancer Institute, said in a statement. "Even if the use of these solutions could reduce transmission by 50 percent, it would have a major impact."Read on to find out more about what else has been proven to kill coronavirus, and for more news from this week, check out The CDC Now Says You Should Wear Your Mask in These 7 Places. 1 SunlightIf you've ever experienced the pain of a bad sunburn, you know that the sun's rays pack more of a punch than just making things bright. A study published in the Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology in June concluded that "90 percent or more of SARS-CoV-2 virus will be inactivated after being exposed [to summer sun] for 11 to 34 minutes." And if you're concerned you could have the virus, check out If You Can't Smell These 2 Things, You May Have COVID. 2 Far-UVC lightJust because you don't have unlimited access to sunlight in all areas of your house doesn't mean you can't harness the power of light to sterilize your mask, phone, and more. Multiple studies have shown that far-UVC light can effectively inactivate the coronavirus in minutes."Far-UVC light has the potential to be a 'game changer,'" David Brenner, professor of radiation biophysics and director of the Center for Radiological Research, said in a statement. "It can be safely used in occupied public spaces, and it kills pathogens in the air before we can breathe them in." And for more on this COVID-killing innovation, Here's What to Know About UV-C Light. 3 Alcohol-based sanitizerThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states in their guidelines that you should be using hand rub (ABHR) with 60-95 percent alcohol to clean your hands whenever you don't have access to running water and soap. But not all hand sanitizers are made equal: Make sure you're not using one that's been deemed toxic or unsafe for containing methanol instead of ethanol (often labeled as ethyl alcohol) or isopropanol. And to discover signs that you may have been infected with the coronavirus, check out If Your Food Tastes Like These 2 Things, You May Have COVID. 4 Lysol Disinfectant SprayAccording to the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) list of products that can kill COVID-19, everyday Lysol Disinfectant Spray inactivates SARS-CoV-2 after two minutes of contact time, i.e. the number of minutes the product needs to sit on the surface being cleaned before you wipe it up. The classic Lysol Disinfectant Spray was added to the list in July when lab tests concluded that it was effective against the virus, as was Lysol Disinfectant Max Cover Mist. 5 Zep cleanersAccording to the EPA's list of COVID killers, three Zep disinfectants inactivate COVID on surfaces in just one minute: Zep Antibacterial Disinfectant&Cleaner with Lemon, Zep Spirit II Ready-To-Use Detergent Disinfectant, and Zep All-Purpose Bathroom Disinfectant. And for more regular updates on COVID and more, sign up for our daily newsletter. 6 Pine-SolThe Clorox Company announced in September that third-party laboratory testing had been approved by the EPA saying that Pine-Sol was shown to be effective against the novel coronavirus with "10-minute contact time on hard non-porous surfaces," according to a statement. If you're using it to combat COVID, let it sit for the full 10 minutes to make sure the Pine-Sol does its job. 7 BleachAs a powerful disinfectant, a diluted bleach solution can come through in a pinch as an effective way to clean non-porous surfaces. To combat the coronavirus, the CDC recommends a diluted bleach solution made up of ⅓ cup bleach per 1 gallon of water or 4 teaspoons bleach per 1 quart of water. Just make sure to toss it at the end of the day because it will lose its potency. Also, remember to wear protective gloves when working with bleach and, though it should go without saying, don't drink it.

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  • Business
    Thomson Reuters StreetEvents

    Edited Transcript of FCX.N earnings conference call or presentation 22-Oct-20 2:00pm GMT

    Q3 2020 Freeport-McMoRan Inc Earnings Call

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  • Politics
    Yahoo News Canada

    Throwing 'shade' at Trump: Former White House photographer Pete Souza says president doesn't have an 'ounce of empathy or compassion'

    In advance of the U.S. presidential election in November, a new film The Way I See It spotlights former White House chief photographer Pete Souza as he reflects on both the Barack Obama and Ronald Reagan presidencies, and how they differ from Donald Trump.At the core of the film directed by Dawn Porter, which was part of the 2020 Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), is how respect for the office of the president and empathy for the people of America is critically important for anyone in that role. The message comes across by looking back at some of the most impactful and interesting photographs taken throughout Souza’s career at the White House.“I want people to think about what kind of person, what kind of human being do we want in the office of the presidency,” Souza told Yahoo Canada. “Do we want somebody who’s confident, respectful, dignified, ethical, moral or do we want somebody who’s a liar, who bullies people, who thinks the presidency is about him.”“Those are the two choices between the current president and Joe Biden, because Joe Biden has those same leadership qualities and human qualities as Barack Obama and Donald Trump has none of them.”Throwing ‘shade’ at TrumpSouza, who has photographed arguably the most notable Democratic and Republican presidents in U.S. history (although he had significantly more access to Obama), never sought out being featured in a documentary. He got the attention of Laura Dern and her production company’s team, who ended up attending one of Souza’s book talks and eventually convincing him to participate.The legendary photographer mostly kept his political opinions to himself but when Trump became U.S. president, he had to speak up and call out the behaviour and rhetoric he disagreed with. Souza started getting attention on social media when he began making using his images of Obama to compare the two presidents on Instagram, eventually collecting them into a book call “Shade: A Tale of Two Presidents.”While the “shade” is addressed throughout the film, it also shows that stark contrast between the photographs taken of Trump versus Obama. Authentic, emotional and humanizing moments that were able to be captured by Souza seemingly do not exist of President Trump.“I don’t know that they exist,” Souza said. “The one time we saw him supposedly consoling families was after those two mass shootings in Ohio and Texas, and they virtually showed all the video footage behind the scenes, that was all about him wanting to be treated like a rock star, he didn’t really console anybody.”“He just doesn’t have an ounce of empathy or compassion inside of him, that’s not who he is, everything’s about himself, it’s not about other people. I don’t know that those images exist because that’s not the kind of human being he is.”The importance of the still image for historyIf anyone was at all doubting the power of a still image, The Way I See It showcases the undeniable way Souza’s images, of both joyous and upsetting moments, can instantly impact your emotions.Some of the many notable images of Obama include the former U.S. president and officials in the situation room during the Bin Laden raid, five-year-old Jacob Philadelphia touching Obama’s hair in the Oval Office, and several touching images of Obama with his daughters and wife, Michelle. Souza released another book titled “Obama: An Intimate Portrait,” a visual biography of the Obama presidency.“[The still image] can evoke emotion in a more visceral way than video,” Souza explains “Everybody brings their own background and prejudices when looking at a still image, but at the same time it is a universal language and I think people can relate to an image and know that it's authentic, as soon as they see it.”Not only are these images beautiful but they also shape history, capturing moments in time for future generations to see, be informed and learn from.Moving forward, if Biden becomes the next U.S. president after the November election, Souza does plan to call Biden and “remind him that the job of the official White House photographer is to document the presidency for history.”“In order to do that, he needs to give his photographer the kind of access that I had with President Obama,” Souza said. “The Biden administration can make a determination on whether those images are made public or not, but for history, he's got to make sure that his photographer has access, and I have no doubt that Biden will understand that.”

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