• Politics
    Axios

    Schumer privately says he wants to freeze last-minute stimulus changes in order to pass bill

    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer is privately saying he can pass President Biden's $1.9 trillion coronavirus package but wants to avoid any last-minute changes jeopardizing its trajectory, three sources familiar with the talks tell Axios.Why it matters: While the president hoped to enlist Republican support for the measure, Schumer has worked to ensure he has a solid 50 votes to muscle it through if necessary. A parliamentary ruling Thursday improved his chances.Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic insights with Axios Markets. Subscribe for freeWhat we're hearing: Schumer met with a group of moderate Democratic senators Thursday morning. They pushed for some changes in the bill — including moving pots of money around, more funding for broadband and rural hospitals and extending unemployment benefits beyond August.“They have some ideas and we are going to check them out,” Schumer told Axios afterward.Asked if some of the lawmakers suggested lowering the bill's overall price tag, Schumer said: “I am not going into any details.”The leader is wary of rocking the boat right now, the sources said, and expects the measure will remain relatively unchanged in its final version."Schumer [has] been privately meeting with members to get their input on the legislation to make sure it was included in the drafting," a person familiar with the meetings said.The latest: The Senate parliamentarian announced Thursday night that Democrats could not include a $15 minimum wage provision within the measure under the reconciliation process.The ruling was significant because Sens. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) said they were opposed to including the wage hike in the package, potentially costing the Democrats critical votes.The bottom line: Democrats have largely been in lockstep that a nearly $2 trillion package is required to meet the urgency of the COVID-19 crisis.Last month, a group of 10 moderate Republican senators offered an approximately $600 billion counterproposal, but it was summarily rejected by the White House.The White House has been publicly optimistic it will add some Republican support but has privately been preparing to pass the package regardless.That strategy requires the entire Democratic Senate caucus to support it, leaving no room for error.More from Axios: Sign up to get the latest market trends with Axios Markets. Subscribe for free

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  • U.S.
    The State

    Teen in hospital for sledding injury dies after dad died visiting her, Ohio mom says

    “Her daddy got to heaven just before she did.”

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  • World
    TechCrunch

    Has a startup finally found one of food science's holy grails with its healthy sugar substitute?

    Sharing the stage with other innovation-minded budding entrepreneurs, the Cambridge scientists boasted of a technology that could produce a sweetener that would mimic not just the taste of sugar, but the caramelization and stickiness that makes sugar the go-to additive for the bulk of roughly 74% of packaged foods that are made with some form of sweetener. Their company, Cambridge Glycoscience  could claim a huge slice of a market worth at least a $100 billion market, they said. Now, the company has a new name, Supplant, and $24 million in venture capital financing to start commercializing its low-cost sugar substitute made from the waste materials of other plants. By the first century AD Greek and Roman scholars were referencing its medicinal properties and, after the Crusades, sugar consumption traveled across Europe through the Middle Ages.

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  • Business
    Yahoo Life Shopping

    Amazon just dropped its incredible weekend deals—here's everything worth buying

    This weekend is jam-packed with deals—score big on Apple, Samsung, Sony, Cuisinart, Shark and more.

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  • U.S.
    TODAY

    9-year-old girl cries to virtual class that she's 'starving,' local food bank steps in

    After the third-grader's classroom incident, a social worker connected the family to a local food bank.

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