• Politics
    Reuters

    New Jersey congressman Van Drew, who ditched Democrats for Trump, battling to keep seat

    President Donald Trump said New Jersey congressman Jeff Van Drew had "guts" when he abandoned the Democratic Party to join the Republicans, while an opponent nicknamed him "Switcheroo Van Drew." Next week, Van Drew will learn what voters in his district think of the move. Recent polling indicates he is struggling in his Nov. 3 race for re-election in New Jersey's 2nd Congressional District against Democratic challenger Amy Kennedy, a former schoolteacher who married into the storied American political family.

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  • Politics
    HuffPost

    Fox News Cuts Off Lindsey Graham In The Middle Of His Latest Money Plea

    Fox News may have had enough of the South Carolina senator's desperate bids for cash.

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  • Politics
    Politico

    ‘I’m Absolutely Expecting Him to Do Something Weird’: How Trump Could End His Presidency

    Presidents typically reserve their most controversial decisions for their last weeks in office. Imagine what that could mean for Trump.

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  • U.S.
    Reuters

    A Chicago dad wanted revenge after his son was shot. An outreach worker talked him down

    On a warm evening last spring, Bo Deal got word that a teenager had been shot at a street corner in Chicago's Austin neighborhood. A 17-year-old named Javell Gates, he learned, had taken a bullet to the foot while buying a snow cone from a street vender. Deal recognized the teen's name - he was friends with his father, Jervelle Gates.

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  • Health
    Eat This, Not That!

    Doing This One Thing Can Drive Your Weight Loss, New Study Shows

    Losing weight takes commitment and discipline, money, knowledge, and, of course, no shortage of resolve to alter your habits for the better. Given how difficult it can be, you'd be wise to tip the odds of success in your favor along the way by adopting any of these expert-backed tips, tricks, and tactics. But according to new research recently presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress 2020, there's at least one more thing you should consider doing to increase your chances of shedding a few pounds and keeping it off: Asking your partner (or a friend) to join you."Our study shows that when spouses join the effort to change habits, patients have a better chance of becoming healthier—particularly when it comes to losing weight," writes Lotte Verweij, a registered nurse and Ph.D. student at the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences in the Netherlands. "Patients with partners who joined the weight loss program lost more weight compared to patients with a partner who did not join the program." (Related: 21 Best Healthy Cooking Hacks of All Time.)Though the study focused on those who are recovering from a heart attack, specifically, the principle no doubt applies to anyone who wishes to lose weight. To arrive at their findings, the researchers followed 411 study subjects who adopted healthy lifestyle changes compared to 413 subjects who didn't. The changes were focused on three main areas: "weight reduction, physical activity, and smoking cessation, depending on their needs and preferences."The weight-loss group held weekly group sessions with a coach from Weight Watchers for a full year. The physical activity group wore a Philips Direct Life accelerometer for the same period, and the group focused on kicking their smoking habit received "motivational interviewing by telephone" from professionals at Luchtsignaal, and were given cessation aids and varenicline therapy. At the end of their journey, the patients "with a participating partner" were "more than twice as likely (odds ratio 2.45) to improve in at least one of the three areas within a year.""Couples often have comparable lifestyles and changing habits is difficult when only one person is making the effort," said Verweij. "Practical issues come into play, such as grocery shopping, but also psychological challenges, where a supportive partner may help maintain motivation."The new findings bolster existing research that makes a connection between your spouse and your weight. Past studies have shown that when one-half of a married couple becomes obese, there's a 37 percent chance the other half will, too. The new study shows that the reverse could be true if you and your spouse try to do something about it—together.That being said, if you're looking to lose weight as a male/female couple, it's important to remember that you can't be following the exact same plans. "Men can eat more than women without gaining, and lose weight by cutting back less," Cynthia Sass, MPH, MA, RD, told WebMD.Experts agree that men and women should adopt different weight-loss models if they're trying to lose weight. For instance, female bodies may respond differently to exercise. "When men increase exercise, they lose weight because their bodies do not encourage them to eat more," Nancy Clark, MS, RD, also told WebMD. However, the same is typically not true for most women.So remember that dropping pounds is not one-size-fits-all, and the most important thing is that you have someone you care about there reciprocating your moral support. For more help to guide you on your weight-loss journey, don't miss these 200 Best Ever Weight Loss Tips!

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